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I am doing a project using python where I have two arrays of data. Let's call them pc and pnc. I am required to plot a cumulative distribution of both of these on the same graph. For pc it is supposed to be a less than plot i.e. at (x,y), y points in pc must have value less than x. For pnc it is to be a more than plot i.e. at (x,y), y points in pnc must have value more than x.

I have tried using histogram function - pyplot.hist. Is there a better and easier way to do what i want? Also, it has to be plotted on a logarithmic scale on the x-axis.

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It'd help if you showed your attempts so far - sample input data, desired output etc... Otherwise this reads as a "show me the code" question –  Jon Clements Mar 14 '13 at 11:49
    
To extend Jon's comment, people are much happier to help you fix the code you have rather than to generate code from scratch. No matter how buggy and non-functional your code is, show it and explain what a) you expect it to do and b) what it is currently doing. –  tcaswell Mar 14 '13 at 13:14
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You were close. You should not use plt.hist as numpy.histogram, that gives you both the values and the bins, than you can plot the cumulative with ease:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# some fake data
data = np.random.randn(1000)
# evaluate the histogram
values, base = np.histogram(data, bins=40)
#evaluate the cumulative
cumulative = np.cumsum(values)
# plot the cumulative function
plt.plot(base[:-1], cumulative, c='blue')
#plot the survival function
plt.plot(base[:-1], len(data)-cumulative, c='green')

plt.show()

enter image description here

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FYI, you forgot to include the np before the cumsum as your np.histogram command implies is needed. –  ehsteve Dec 19 '13 at 18:27
    
@ehsteve fixed answer. –  Gabriel Feb 5 at 18:26
1  
@Gabriel thanks! –  ehsteve Feb 5 at 22:07
    
Using a histogram is both unnecessarily heavy and imprecise. –  EOL Mar 23 at 8:56
    
@EOL but necessary for large arrays else you'll run out of memory. –  aaren Mar 26 at 10:54
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Using histograms is really unnecessarily heavy and imprecise (the binning makes the data fuzzy): you can just sort all the x values: the index of each value is the number of values that are smaller:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

# Some fake data:
data = np.random.randn(1000)

sorted_data = np.sort(data)  # Or data.sort(), if data can be modified

# Cumulative distributions:
plt.step(sorted_data, np.arange(sorted_data.size))  # From 0 to the number of data points-1
plt.step(sorted_data[::-1], np.arange(sorted_data.size))  # From the number of data points-1 to 0

plt.show()

Furthermore, a more appropriate plot style is indeed plt.step() instead of plt.plot(), since the data is in discrete locations.

The result is:

enter image description here

You can see that it is more ragged than the output of EnricoGiampieri's answer: this is because it does not smooth the data and is the real histogram (instead of being an approximate version of it).

PS: As SebastianRaschka noted, the very last point should ideally show the total count (instead of the total count-1). This can be achieved with:

plt.step(np.concatenate([sorted_data, sorted_data[[-1]]]), np.arange(sorted_data.size+1))
plt.step(np.concatenate([sorted_data[::-1], sorted_data[[0]]]), np.arange(sorted_data.size+1))

There are so many points in data that the effect is not visible without a zoom, but the very last point at the total count does matter when the data contains only a few points.

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However for large arrays you want to go with the histogram approach as it doesn't require nearly as much memory. The plt.step method gives me a memory error with my 60 million element array. –  aaren Mar 26 at 10:52
    
Agreed. I'm not sure whether the problem lies with plt.step or with the fact that this exact method uses maybe 3 times the memory of the array, or both… –  EOL Mar 26 at 14:05
    
I agree: plt.step is probably the more appropriate approach for plotting "counts". One question: wouldn't you have to use plt.step(sorted_data, np.arange(1, data.size+1)) to get the correct counts? –  Sebastian Raschka Jul 2 at 20:53
1  
@SebastianRaschka: Good point. You are correct. A perfect solution would add this last point. This can be done by duplicating the last abscissa and adding the total count (5) at the last ordinate. I updated the answer, thanks! –  EOL Jul 4 at 3:19
1  
Thanks for the update. Your workaround looks definitely nicer than mine :) –  Sebastian Raschka Jul 4 at 6:08
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After conclusive discussion with @EOL, I wanted to post my solution (upper left) using a random Gaussian sample as a summary:

enter image description here

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from math import ceil, floor, sqrt

def pdf(x, mu=0, sigma=1):
    """
    Calculates the normal distribution's probability density 
    function (PDF).  

    """
    term1 = 1.0 / ( sqrt(2*np.pi) * sigma )
    term2 = np.exp( -0.5 * ( (x-mu)/sigma )**2 )
    return term1 * term2


# Drawing sample date poi
##################################################

# Random Gaussian data (mean=0, stdev=5)
data1 = np.random.normal(loc=0, scale=5.0, size=30)
data2 = np.random.normal(loc=2, scale=7.0, size=30)
data1.sort(), data2.sort()

min_val = floor(min(data1+data2))
max_val = ceil(max(data1+data2))

##################################################




fig = plt.gcf()
fig.set_size_inches(12,11)

# Cumulative distributions, stepwise:
plt.subplot(2,2,1)
plt.step(np.concatenate([data1, data1[[-1]]]), np.arange(data1.size+1), label='$\mu=0, \sigma=5$')
plt.step(np.concatenate([data2, data2[[-1]]]), np.arange(data2.size+1), label='$\mu=2, \sigma=7$') 

plt.title('30 samples from a random Gaussian distribution (cumulative)')
plt.ylabel('Count')
plt.xlabel('X-value')
plt.legend(loc='upper left')
plt.xlim([min_val, max_val])
plt.ylim([0, data1.size+1])
plt.grid()

# Cumulative distributions, smooth:
plt.subplot(2,2,2)

plt.plot(np.concatenate([data1, data1[[-1]]]), np.arange(data1.size+1), label='$\mu=0, \sigma=5$')
plt.plot(np.concatenate([data2, data2[[-1]]]), np.arange(data2.size+1), label='$\mu=2, \sigma=7$') 

plt.title('30 samples from a random Gaussian (cumulative)')
plt.ylabel('Count')
plt.xlabel('X-value')
plt.legend(loc='upper left')
plt.xlim([min_val, max_val])
plt.ylim([0, data1.size+1])
plt.grid()


# Probability densities of the sample points function
plt.subplot(2,2,3)

pdf1 = pdf(data1, mu=0, sigma=5)
pdf2 = pdf(data2, mu=2, sigma=7)
plt.plot(data1, pdf1, label='$\mu=0, \sigma=5$')
plt.plot(data2, pdf2, label='$\mu=2, \sigma=7$')

plt.title('30 samples from a random Gaussian')
plt.legend(loc='upper left')
plt.xlabel('X-value')
plt.ylabel('probability density')
plt.xlim([min_val, max_val])
plt.grid()


# Probability density function
plt.subplot(2,2,4)

x = np.arange(min_val, max_val, 0.05)

pdf1 = pdf(x, mu=0, sigma=5)
pdf2 = pdf(x, mu=2, sigma=7)
plt.plot(x, pdf1, label='$\mu=0, \sigma=5$')
plt.plot(x, pdf2, label='$\mu=2, \sigma=7$')

plt.title('PDFs of Gaussian distributions')
plt.legend(loc='upper left')
plt.xlabel('X-value')
plt.ylabel('probability density')
plt.xlim([min_val, max_val])
plt.grid()

plt.show()
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