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I'm trying to plot an ellipse in matplotlib, but when I execute this code:

from matplotlib.pyplot import *
from matplotlib.patches import Ellipse

fig = Figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.add_artist(Ellipse(xy=(1, 1), width=2, height=2, facecolor='g', edgecolor='k', alpha=.1))
show()

nothing happens at all. I get no figure, much less an ellipse.

What gives?

Thanks very much in advance!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The figure must be spelled in lower case. You want to create a figure and display it. If you use the Uppercase spelling, you instantiate the Figure class.

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
from matplotlib.patches import Ellipse

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.add_artist(Ellipse(xy=(1, 1), width=2, height=2, facecolor='g', edgecolor='k', alpha=.1))
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
whaaaaat? Figure works just fine for every plot I've made so far; isn't it a class? What's the difference, then, between Figure and figure? – blz Mar 14 '13 at 11:54
    
and even with the lowercase spelling of figure, my problem persists, at least in the interactive shell. In an ipython-notebook, this seems to work. – blz Mar 14 '13 at 11:55
    
What version of mpl and python do you use? It works with mpl 1.2 and python 2.7 on my machine. What backend do you use? – David Zwicker Mar 14 '13 at 11:56
    
I edited my post above, but I'm using python 2.7 latest and (I believe) the development version of mpl. How would I check the mpl version? – blz Mar 14 '13 at 11:57
    
I added links to the documentation, which should be clear about the difference of figure and Figure. – David Zwicker Mar 14 '13 at 11:57

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