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I have a class for numbers, FixedDecimal.

For it I have a test. I run the test with several values; 1, 1.9, 1.99, 1.999, 1.9999.

I'd like named constants for these.

What should I call them?

FixedDecimal _1_ = new FixedDecimal(1, 1);
FixedDecimal _1_9 = new FixedDecimal(19, 10);
FixedDecimal _1_99 = new FixedDecimal(199, 100);
FixedDecimal _1_999 = new FixedDecimal(1999, 1000);
FixedDecimal _1_9999 = new FixedDecimal(19999, 10000);

It looks slightly unintuitive. Is there another character than underscore (_) that I can use?

share|improve this question
11  
naming a constant after its value is senseless, it might as well be a literal. Name it after its usage. – Jodrell Mar 14 '13 at 11:55
    
...or don't name it at all and just use the numeric literal. – NPE Mar 14 '13 at 11:56
    
agreed with @Jodrell it's meaningless to name it like that... – cwhsu Mar 14 '13 at 11:56
2  
This reminds me of an april fools joke I did sometime: #define ONE 1, #define TWO 2, etc. Very useful for whenever the value of ONE has to be redefined to another value someday! ;-) – Jesper Mar 14 '13 at 11:57
1  
Why don't you just use an array of test values? – moooeeeep Mar 14 '13 at 11:59

If the name of your constant reflects a numeric representation of the constant, you're doing it wrong.

Good constants:

BOILING_C = 100
BOILING_F = 212
TUESDAY = 2

Bad constants:

_100 = 100
_212 = 212
//What would you put for Tuesday anyway?

You should probably just use the values directly.

share|improve this answer
    
may comment expanded, +1. – Jodrell Mar 14 '13 at 12:03
    
I realize I should have put more text in my example, but then you could've assumed I was not an idiot. :-) Voted -1. – Roger C S Wernersson Mar 14 '13 at 12:16
    
@RogerWernersson I didn't assume anything about you. I provided a good example in my answer that would help other users who might see this Q/A as well as help you. – Jeff Ferland Mar 14 '13 at 12:17
    
Fair enough. Removed down-vote. :-) – Roger C S Wernersson Mar 14 '13 at 12:18

Using concrete Unitname will help.

FixedDecimal _1 = new FixedDecimal(1, 1);
FixedDecimal _19deci = new FixedDecimal(19, 10);
FixedDecimal _199centi = new FixedDecimal(199, 100);
FixedDecimal _1999mili = new FixedDecimal(1999, 1000);
FixedDecimal _19999micro = new FixedDecimal(19999, 10000);

Regards

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1  
_19deci is better than _19000micro because they are not the same thing. The former has one decimal and the latter four. – Roger C S Wernersson Mar 14 '13 at 12:14
    
Trailing zeros are by convention only significant in decimal numbers, not integers... – Yakk Mar 14 '13 at 12:47
    
@Yakk, so in integer 1000 is 000 insignificant? lol. – Peter Rader Mar 14 '13 at 13:53
    
No, it has 1 digit of significance by the convention I learnt: I also was taught that using "number of digits" as "digits of significance" is sloppy, and you should instead carry around explicit error bounds. – Yakk Mar 14 '13 at 14:00

Although other answers as to practices about constant naming are absolutely correct, an answer for you question is: you can use $ instead of _ in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
$ is not a valid character for an identifier in standard C++. – Pete Becker Mar 14 '13 at 14:40
    
Well, it is in Java. – Cromax Mar 14 '13 at 14:49
    
The question is tagged for both C++ and Java. – Pete Becker Mar 14 '13 at 14:50
    
Although it's not necessarily clear if the intention is for AND whether OR. – Cromax Mar 14 '13 at 14:56
    
I'm confused. Which part of "$ is not a valid character for an identifier in standard C++" are you talking about? It's a simple statement, and correct. – Pete Becker Mar 14 '13 at 14:58

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