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I have the same command that I want to use for two controls on a dialog type window. As potentially interesting background, I'm using Josh Smith's ViewModel / RelayCommand ideas, since I am new to WPF and it's the first thing I've seen that I can actually understand from a big picture point of view.

So the command is a property of a ViewModel, and with the Button's built-in support, it is trivial and painless to bind to the command in the XAML:

<Button ... Command="{Binding Path=PickCommand}"  Content="_Ok"></Button>

Now in a ListView, the only way I have gotten to use the same command hooked up to trigger on a double click is by using an event handler:

<ListView ...
              ItemsSource="{Binding Path=AvailableProjects}" 
              SelectedItem="{Binding Path=SelectedProject, Mode=TwoWay}"
              MouseDoubleClick="OnProjectListingMouseDoubleClick"
              >

private void OnProjectListingMouseDoubleClick(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e) {
        var vm = (ProjectSelectionViewModel) DataContext;
        vm.Pick(); // execute the pick command
    }

Is there a way to do this by binding the way the button does it?

Cheers,
Berryl

<------- implementation - is there a better way? --->

Your SelctionBehavior class was spot on, but I was confused at your xaml code. By setting the "Style" on the listViewItem I was getting the children of the DataContext where the command I want to execute lives. So I attached the behavior to the ListView itself:

<ListView ...Style="{StaticResource _attachedPickCommand}" >

And put the style in a resource dictionary:

<Style x:Key="_attachedPickCommand" TargetType="ListView">
    <Setter Property="behaviors:SelectionBehavior.DoubleClickCommand" Value="{Binding Path=PickCommand}" />
</Style>

It works! But it 'feels' awkward setting the style property of the list view. Is this just because I am not comfortable with style as more than something visual in wpf or is there a better way to do this?

Cheers, and thanks!
Berryl

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes there is! You can use attached behaviors and bind the command to that behavior.

  public class SelectionBehavior {
public static readonly DependencyProperty CommandParameterProperty=
  DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("CommandParameter", typeof(object), typeof(SelectionBehavior));

public static readonly DependencyProperty DoubleClickCommandProperty=
  DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("DoubleClickCommand", typeof(ICommand), typeof(SelectionBehavior),
                                      new PropertyMetadata(OnDoubleClickAttached));

private static void OnDoubleClickAttached(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) {
  var fe=(FrameworkElement)d;

  if(e.NewValue!=null && e.OldValue==null) {
    fe.PreviewMouseDown+=fe_MouseDown;
  } else if(e.NewValue==null && e.OldValue!=null) {
    fe.PreviewMouseDown-=fe_MouseDown;
  }
}

private static void fe_MouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e) {
  if(e.ClickCount==2) {
    var dep=(FrameworkElement)sender;

    var command=GetDoubleClickCommand(dep);

    if(command!=null) {
      var param=GetCommandParameter(dep);
      command.Execute(param);
    }
  }
}

public static ICommand GetDoubleClickCommand(FrameworkElement element) {
  return (ICommand)element.GetValue(DoubleClickCommandProperty);
}

public static void SetDoubleClickCommand(FrameworkElement element, ICommand value) {
  element.SetValue(DoubleClickCommandProperty, value);
}

public static object GetCommandParameter(DependencyObject element) {
  return element.GetValue(CommandParameterProperty);
}

public static void SetCommandParameter(DependencyObject element, object value) {
  element.SetValue(CommandParameterProperty, value);
}

}

and in the xaml you would need to set a style for a ListViewItem which represents your data in the ListView. Example

        <ListView>
        <ListView.ItemContainerStyle>
            <Style TargetType="{x:Type ListViewItem}">
                <Setter Property="local:SelectionBehavior.DoubleClickCommand" Value="{Binding Path=DataContext.PickCommand}"/>
                <Setter Property="local:SelectionBehavior.CommandParameter" Value="{Binding Path=DataContext}"/>
            </Style>
        </ListView.ItemContainerStyle>
    </ListView>

Here is some more information about the Attached Behavior pattern

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Hi Pavel. I can't grok all of this right now, but is it reuseable? Looks like a fair bit of setup if not. Josh Smith again too - looks like this guy is a good one to stick with for a bit. Certainly got lots of material out there. Thks! –  Berryl Oct 9 '09 at 1:20
    
Berryl, yes it is certainly reusable. You can set this behavior on any FrameworkElement and attach a command to it. For example you can create an image element and attach the double click behavior to it. <Image Source="..." local:SelectionBehavior.DoubleClickCommand="{Binding Path=PickImageCommand}"/>. Now whenever the image is double clicked, the PickImageCommand will execute. Optionally you can also add a command parameter the same way. –  Pavel Oct 9 '09 at 13:37
    
Hi Pavel. Can you take a look at my implementation of your (working) idea and comment? Thanks! –  Berryl Oct 12 '09 at 1:37
    
It's at the bottom of my edited question above... –  Berryl Oct 12 '09 at 1:37
1  
Berryl, I'm glad to hear that it worked for you. You can set the attached command on the listview directly. <ListView behaviors:SelectionBehavior.DoubleClickCommand="{Binding Path=PickCommand}" .../> and it should work just fine. It helps putting it in a style if you have multiple ListView's that want to use the same properties but you don't have to. Hope that helped! –  Pavel Oct 12 '09 at 15:03

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