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From my C# 4.0 code, I want to execute some queries on Sybase and MSSQL. The database being used (or to be used) will be decided/known at runtime only.

I am using AseCommand and SqlCommand for Sybase and SQL respectively.

I decided to create generic method like this:

private Department ExecuteCommand<T>(T databaseCommand) where T : class
{
            Department department = new Department ();

            dynamic command = databaseCommand;

            using (dynamic databaseReader = command.ExecuteReader())
            {
                if (databaseReader.HasRows)
                {

                    while (databaseReader.Read())
                    {
                         department.Employees.Add(this.CreateDepartmentInstance(databaseReader));
                    }
                }
            }

            command.Connection.Dispose();

            return department;
        }

Questions:

  1. Is there better option other than dynamic?
  2. What is usually the right way to know the type of the argument passed to the generic method?
  3. Of course, I can write two separate methods for Sybase and SQL. But why to do so when something like dynamic is at disposal?
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8  
Here's a handy rule of thumb: If you need to know the type of a generic argument, then generics is probably the wrong tool for the job. –  spender Mar 14 '13 at 12:06
1  
@spender - I would +100 that comment if I could! –  Jamiec Mar 14 '13 at 12:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You do not necessarily need dynamic here, all you require is a common interface (which in this instance they both have):

private Department ExecuteCommand<T>(T databaseCommand) where T : IDbCommand

However, in this instance since you are not doing anything particularly interesting with type T (as far as I can see), the following method signature would suffice:

private Department ExecuteCommand(IDbCommand databaseCommand)

In general, if there is no common interface, I'd recommend using the facade pattern and simply delegating method calls through to equivalents on the actual implementation.

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3  
...or, less confusingly ExecuteCommand(IDbCommand databaseCommand) –  spender Mar 14 '13 at 12:08
    
@rich.okelly : I completely missed IDbCommand. I did not notice both of them implement IDbCommand. –  CSharpLearner Mar 14 '13 at 12:13

It looks like AseCommand and SqlCommand both implement IDbCommand, so you just need to change the type constraint:

private Department ExecuteCommand<T>(T databaseCommand) where T : IDbCommand
{
    Department department = new Department();

    using (IDataReader databaseReader = databaseCommand.ExecuteReader())
    {
        if (databaseReader.HasRows)
        {

            while (databaseReader.Read())
            {
                department.Employees.Add(
                                 this.CreateDepartmentInstance(databaseReader));
            }
        }
    }

    command.Connection.Dispose();

    return department;
}

I Imagine you'd also need to change CreateDepartmentInstance to accept an IDataReader if it doesn't already.

Though as rich.okelly points out, it doesn't look like there's really a reason to use generics here in the first place.

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Answer to #2:

if (typeof(T) == typeof(object) ) {
    // Check for IEnumerable
}

Replace object with whatever type you would like to check for.

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In your case, using a common interface will do just fine.

In general, if you want to find out the type of an object you can always use the is and as-Operators.

private Department ExecuteCommand<T>(T databaseCommand) where T : class
{
            Department department = new Department ();

            var command = databaseCommand;

            using (var databaseReader = command.ExecuteReader())
            {
                if ((databaseReader as IDataReader).HasRows)
                {

                    while ((databaseReader as IDataReader).Read())
                    {
                          department.Employees.Add(this.CreateDepartmentInstance(databaseReader));
                    }
                }
            }

            command.Connection.Dispose();

            return department;
        }

Not verified in VS, but it should work.

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