Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

System Configuration: Win XP (i7 2.1 Ghz) External USB NIC. Communication : Master slave communication. Constrain - Communication Protocol UDP.

Socket Configuration: RecvFrom - Non blocking. Socket size changed to 1*1024*1024 using setsockopt.

My setup consist of a node communicating with the master over UDP, it send fragmented data in the Payload of the UDP frame. This fragmented data consist of 5 framents per Ethernet frame. The slave node sends 1270 bytes of fragmented data to the master. Slaves send 18 - 20 Frames in less than 2 Milliseconds.

The master receives this frames periodically without dropping them. However randomly the payload data from the UDP frame, containing 2 correct fragments and rest of the 3 fragemts are garbage value. I observed the trace on wireshark there in the smae fragment correct data can be observed, but some how the recvfrom API collects garbage data in these 3 fragements. It seems some how the actually information is replaced by this garbage value. and this behaviour drops when i reduce the numbeer of packets to 2 - 3 per 2 msec.

Trace from the console:

_recvBuf[2]: 0x5b  _recvBuf[256}: 0x5c  _recvBuf[510]: 0x5d  
_recvBuf[764}: 0x5e  _recvBuf[1018}: 0x5f

_recvBuf[2]: 0x60  _recvBuf[256}: 0x61  _recvBuf[510]: 0x64  
_recvBuf[764}: 0x0  _recvBuf[1018}: 0x0

Expected and as in the Wireshark trace:
_recvBuf[510]: 0x64  --> should be _recvBuf[510]: 0x62
_recvBuf[764}: 0x0  --> should be _recvBuf[510]: 0x63
_recvBuf[1018}: 0x0  --> should be _recvBuf[510]: 0x64

and garbage value offently repeats to 0xcd, for random packet number.

!!! Packet 200 - Error !!! Packet 20000 - Error !!! Packet 60000 - Error !!! Packet 2 - Error

i am not able to understand why is this behaviour.

code:

receive()
{
rc = select(_sock_fd+1, &read_fd, &write_fd, &excep_fd, &to);

    if (rc == 0 )  
    acess = 1; 

    else if (rc == SOCKET_ERROR) 
    {
        closesocket(_sock_fd);
        return -1;
    } 
    else 
    {
        if (!FD_ISSET(_sock_fd, &read_fd)) 
        {
            LogError("XCP: select() wrong socket descr");
            return -1;
        }
        else
        {

        rc = recvfrom(_sock_fd, (char *)_recvBuf, UDP_RECVBUFLEN, 0, (LPSOCKADDR)&_saddr, &cli_alen);

           printf("_recvBuf[3]: 0x%x  _recvBuf[2]: 0x%x  _recvBuf[256}: 0x%x  _recvBuf[510]: 0x%x  _recvBuf[764}: 0x%x  _recvBuf[1018}: 0x%x\n",_recvBuf[3],_recvBuf[2],_recvBuf[256],_recvBuf[510],_recvBuf[764],_recvBuf[1018]);
            _recvBuf[*(&rc)]='\0';

            if(rc == SOCKET_ERROR) 
            {
                closesocket(_sock_fd);
                return -1;
            }


                    _recvBufLen = rc;

            if (_recvBufLen > 0) 
            {
                int rc = 0;
                acess = 0;

                if (_rxNotification != NULL)
                    _rxNotification(_parent, _xhdl, _recvBuf, _recvBufLen);

                RxbufferLen=*(u16*)&_recvBufLen;

                /* Proto RX Queue Implementation Start */
                if(!(Fullqueue(Rxbufferqueue)))
                    Enqueue(Rxbufferqueue,_recvBuf);

                if(_recvBuf[4]==0xff)
                    acess = 1;
                else
                    acess = 0;

                return rc;
            }
            else 
                return 0;
        }
    }

Additional information about the functions:

void XcpTransportUdp::Enqueue (Queuetype &queue, unsigned char buf[MAX_BUFFER_SIZE_QUEUE],u16 _recvBufLen)  // Push Function for Queue
{
    Rxbufferqueue.BackPointer=(Rxbufferqueue.BackPointer+1)%MAX_BUFFER_IN_QUEUE;
    Rxbufferqueue.Recv_length[Rxbufferqueue.BackPointer]=_recvBufLen;
    memcpy(Rxbufferqueue.Buffer[Rxbufferqueue.BackPointer],buf,Rxbufferqueue.Recv_length[Rxbufferqueue.BackPointer]);
}
u16 XcpTransportUdp::Dequeue (Queuetype &queue, unsigned char Output_buffer[MAX_BUFFER_SIZE_QUEUE])  // Pop Function for Queue
{
    Rxbufferqueue.Frontpointer =(Rxbufferqueue.Frontpointer+1)%MAX_BUFFER_IN_QUEUE;
    BufLen=Rxbufferqueue.Recv_length[Rxbufferqueue.Frontpointer];
    memcpy(Output_buffer,Rxbufferqueue.Buffer[Rxbufferqueue.Frontpointer],Rxbufferqueue.Recv_length[Rxbufferqueue.Frontpointer]);
    return BufLen;
}

:::Edir1::: i found the error has to do with the memory initialization and not the with the sockets. the memcpy function in the enqueue function reports the error of the length being 0cCD. do any one know the solution for this issue..?

share|improve this question
3  
0xCD is often the sign that you are reading uninitialized memory. –  Cicada Mar 14 '13 at 12:10
    
Could you post a snippet of code that shows how you are reading from the UDP socket? –  Steve Valliere Mar 14 '13 at 12:11
    
I am not able to understand what you want. Do you want us to point out where the bug in your code is? –  PlasmaHH Mar 14 '13 at 12:33
    
As you can see the printf function is is immediately after the recvfrom function. for example i get around 800 ethernet frames correct and then 801 is error, and then next error comes at 20000 frame. i am not able to understand, why is the socket collecting garbage. till the 800 frames it collect correct value and then garbage and then untill 20000 correct value and then again garbage. More over this behaviour is random. the only consistensy is garbage value. as far as i see the code has nothing wrong in it –  Pipa's Mar 14 '13 at 12:51

1 Answer 1

I see one questionable thing right away:

You should check the return code for failure FIRST, especially before using the return code as an index into an array! I don't think that it is safe to set _recvBuf[SOCKET_ERROR] = '\0'; and yet, that is exactly what will happen on the line _recvBuf[*(&rc)] = '\0'; if there is an error. Also, what is the point of *(&rc) when you could just use rc?

Also, the code doesn't show the declaration of _recvBuf so we must assume that it is large enough to receive UDP_RECVBUFLEN characters (another symbol whose value we don't see in the sample code.) Did you really need to cast _recvBuf to (char *) in the recv() call? I ask because you appear to be treating it as if it is a character array elsewhere. I'm also not sure if you are verifying that you read as many bytes as you think you should before printing those bytes.

share|improve this answer
    
My Applogies, actually the project is big enough. neverthe less, _recvbuf is declared as unsigned char _recvBuf and _sendBuf = (u8 *)calloc(1,XCP_MAX_UDP_PACKET_SIZE); initialized XCP_MAX_UDP_PACKET_SIZE = 0x100000 (1048576) _recvBuf[*(&rc)] = '\0'; is crap please ignore. i dont think casting recbuf as char can collect garbage, because in the whole process flow i am not converting in into any other type. please correct me if i am wrong. –  Pipa's Mar 14 '13 at 14:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.