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The essence of my question is this:

What is the best approach for creating a new object in a c function and pass some reference to that new object to the caller?

My overall setting is a bit more complex and involves mixed c and c++ code, so I am including some background information:

I am creating a c++ library for a 3D engine. The library is intended to be used from host applications on different platforms.

For easy compatibility reasons I now intent to hide all c++ code behind an API in plain c. This works pretty well so far.

The only thing I am not sure about is, which is the best way for actually creating my engine instance through my c API.

My first approach was this:

// in myEngineAPI.h
void myEngineCreate(void * myEngine);
void myEngineRelease(void * myEngine);


// in myEngineAPI.cpp
#include "myEngineAPI.h"
#include "myPrivateCppEngine.h"

void myEngineCreate(void * myEngine) {
    myEngine = new Engine;               // <- this doesn't seem to work as expected
}
void myEngineRelease(void * myEngine) {
    delete ((Engine *)myEngine);
}


// in my host application
#include "myEngineAPI.h"

void * myEngine = NULL;
myEngineCreate(myEngine);    // <- problem: myEngine is still NULL after this line.

// ...draw some fancy stuff...

myEngineRelease(myEngine);

I would expect that myEngineCreate(void * myEngine) would assign the address of my newly created object to myEngine. But after the function returns, myEngine still points to NULL. Why?

Now my second approach was this:

// in myEngineAPI.h
void * myEngineCreate();
void myEngineRelease(void * myEngine);


// in myEngineAPI.cpp
#include "myEngineAPI.h"
#include "myPrivateCppEngine.h"

void * myEngineCreate() {
    return new Engine;               // <- ok, the function returns a valid pointer
}
void myEngineRelease(void * myEngine) {
    delete ((Engine *)myEngine);
}


// in my host application
#include "myEngineAPI.h"

void * myEngine = myEngineCreate();  // <- yay, I have a void pointer to my engine

// ...draw some fancy stuff...

myEngineRelease(myEngine);

This works. myEngineCreate() gives me an opaque pointer to my engine instance, which I can use in my subsequent drawing calls and which I can also hand to my release function that cleans up memory when I'm done with it. The problem with this approach is, that my profiler complains about a memory leak in myEngineCreate(). I understand that creating an object in one place and owning it in another is a delicate business, and I seem to do something wrong here - but what?

Thanks in advance for any advice or help.

share|improve this question
    
If you need to work with generics, use templates in C++, but avoid void* wherever possible! This is error-prone. –  bash.d Mar 14 '13 at 12:12
    
i'm assuming the host application is written in C and myengine in c++, hence the use of void*, as long as you don't forget to call myEngineRelease() the second approach should not be a problem, for the first approach see the answer by Joachim Pileborg below (but of course you still have to delete the object at some point) –  msam Mar 14 '13 at 12:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Lets take your myEngineCreate function:

void myEngineCreate(void * myEngine) {
    myEngine = new Engine;
}

This does not work because myEngine is a local variable within the scope of the myEngineCreate function. To pass a pointer "by reference" in C you have to pass it as a pointer to a pointer, and use the derefernece operator to assign to the pointer:

void myEngineCreate(void ** myEngine) {
    *myEngine = new Engine;
}

And you call it by using the address-of operator & of a pointer:

void * myEngine;
myEngineCreate(&myEngine);
share|improve this answer
1  
Although this answer nicely explains why the present code doesn't work, please note that this is not the optimal solution in C, as there is no type safety. –  Lundin Mar 14 '13 at 12:26
    
Right, the first approach works now. Thanks for pointing this out. I am nevertheless still getting memory leaks, I'll run some more tests... –  de. Mar 14 '13 at 12:42
    
Ok, I fixed my leak. It turned out to be unrelated. –  de. Mar 17 '13 at 22:14

What is the best approach for creating a new object in a c function and pass some reference to that new object to the caller?

In C, the best, object-orientated way is to create an object of incomple type, also known as opaque type (a void pointer is not an opaque type, it is just a raw address) .

Example:

// engine.h

typedef struct engine_t engine_t;

engine_t* engine_create (void);

// engine.c

struct engine_t
{
  /* all variables placed here will have true private encapsulation */
};


engine_t* engine_create (void)
{
  return new engine_t();
}

// main.c

int main()
{
  engine_t* my_engine = engine_create();
}

This is real object-orientation in C, the best OO you can achieve without C++ language support. The caller will not be able to access any members of the struct.

But after the function returns, myEngine still points to NULL. Why?

Because pointers themselves are passed by value in C and C++. You either have to pass the address of a pointer or return the pointer to the caller. Multiple questions and FAQ about this topic can easily be found on SO.

share|improve this answer
    
Your answer is the most detailed and gives a lot of interesting details. Nevertheless, I am so far sticking to the void* it seems the simplest solution and I really do not need more right now. Thanks for pointing out the difference between a void pointer and an opaque type. –  de. Mar 17 '13 at 22:13

I did something similar using opaque pointers:

typedef struct my_c_engine *myCEngine;

extern "C" myCEngine createEngine() {
    return reinterpret_cast<myCEngine>(new myRealEngineClass());
}

extern "C" void releaseEngine(myCEngine c) {
    if(c) {
        myRealEngineClass *x = reinterpret_cast<myRealEngineClass*>(c);
        delete x;
    }
}

I did this way because I wanted the C part to be completely isolated.

share|improve this answer
    
I prefer not to hide the pointer syntax behind a typedef, it is confusing to read. Also as a side note: you don't need to check c for NULL, no matter if you use new/delete or malloc()/free(). delete and free() both tolerate NULL as a parameter. –  Lundin Mar 14 '13 at 12:30
    
Thanks for adding extern "C" in your example. I had to add this to my code, too. –  de. Mar 17 '13 at 22:05

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