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Not getting clearity regarding the purpose of this method.Tried to get some idea using the following code :

String pattern = Pattern.quote("1252343% 8 567 hdfg gf^$545");
System.out.println("Pattern is : "+pattern);

Get an output :

Pattern is : \Q1252343% 8 567 hdfg gf^$545\E

What is \Q and \E here. Also The docs description says :

Returns a literal pattern String for the specified String.

This method produces a String that can be used to create a Pattern that would match the string s as if it were a literal pattern.

Metacharacters or escape sequences in the input sequence will be given no special meaning.

But its return type is string... So from string we are getting string only and not compiled Pattern Object. Then why this method required and what is its use from development scenario.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

\Q means "start of literal text" (ie regex "open quote")
\E means "end of literal text" (ie regex "close quote")

Calling the Pattern.quote() method means the text is turned into a regex literal. Referring to the javadoc:

Returns a literal pattern String for the specified String.

This method produces a String that can be used to create a Pattern that would match the string s as if it were a literal pattern.

Metacharacters or escape sequences in the input sequence will be given no special meaning.


I'm afraid this is another case of RTFM.

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7  
I actually think this is no RTFM -- the javadoc is hard to comprehend and mentioning that \Q and \E are regex open and close special characters adds value. –  sandris May 7 at 12:57

The Pattern.quote method quotes part of a regex pattern to make regex interpret it as string literals.

Say you have some user input in your search program, and you want to regex for it. But this input may have unsafe characters so you can use

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(Pattern.quote(userInput));

This method does not quote a Pattern but, as you point out, wraps a String in regex quotes.

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If you compile the String returned by Pattern.quote, you'll get a Pattern which matches the literal string that you quoted.

\Q and \E mark the beginning and end of the quoted part of the string.

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\Q and \E, among all others, are thoroughly documented on the java.util.regex.Pattern Javadoc page. They mean "begin Quote", "End quote" and demark a region where all the chars have the literal meaning. The way to use the return of Pattern.quote is to feed it to Pattern.compile, or any other method that accepts a pattern string, such as String.split.

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Regex collides frequently with normal strings. Say I want a regex to search for a certain string that is only known at runtime. How can we be sure that the string doesn't have regex meaning eg("...*")? We quote it.

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