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I have a bidirectional relationship between two objects. I have a RESTful Web Service using Jersey 1.17 and Jackson 2.1.4. I am also using the @JsonIdentityInfo annotation (in a wrong way, apparently!) to stop the Json from getting into an infinite cycle. However, the generated Json is still an infinite loop between the two objects.

The first Object is:

@JsonIdentityInfo(generator = ObjectIdGenerators.IntSequenceGenerator.class, property = "@id")
public class Child {

    private long value;
    private Parent parent;

    public long getValue() {
        return this.value;
    }

    public void setValue(long value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public Parent getParent() {
        return this.parent;
    }

    public void setParent(Parent parent) {
        this.parent = parent;
    }

}

The second Object is:

@JsonIdentityInfo(generator = ObjectIdGenerators.IntSequenceGenerator.class, property = "@id")
public class Parent {

    private long value;
    private Set<Child> childs = new HashSet<Child>(0);

    public long getValue() {
        return this.value;
    }

    public void setValue(long value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public Set<Child> getChilds() {
        return this.childs;
    }

    public void setChilds(Set<Child> childs) {
        this.childs = childs;
    }

}

And here is the method which generates the Json.

@GET
@Path("/test")
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
public Child getChild() {

    Child child = new Child();
    Parent parent = new Parent();
    child.setValue(1L);
    parent.setValue(2L);
    child.setParent(parent);
    Set<Child> childs = new HashSet<Child>(0);
    childs.add(child);
    parent.setChilds(childs);
    return child;

}

EDIT:

The resulting Json looks like this:

{"value":1,"parent":{"value":2,"childs":[{"value":1,"parent":{"value":2,"childs":[...

And these 9 lines were repeated in the server's log file over and over...

at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.std.AsArraySerializerBase.serialize(AsArraySerializerBase.java:86)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanPropertyWriter.serializeAsField(BeanPropertyWriter.java:446)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.std.BeanSerializerBase.serializeFields(BeanSerializerBase.java:150)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanSerializer.serialize(BeanSerializer.java:112)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanPropertyWriter.serializeAsField(BeanPropertyWriter.java:446)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.std.BeanSerializerBase.serializeFields(BeanSerializerBase.java:150)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.BeanSerializer.serialize(BeanSerializer.java:112)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.std.CollectionSerializer.serializeContents(CollectionSerializer.java:72)
at org.codehaus.jackson.map.ser.std.CollectionSerializer.serializeContents(CollectionSerializer.java:23)

And the web.xml file looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<web-app xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
  xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee" xmlns:web="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_2_5.xsd"
  xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/web-app_2_5.xsd"
  id="WebApp_ID" version="2.5">
  <display-name>Jersey REST Service</display-name>
  <servlet>
    <servlet-name>Jersey REST Service</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>com.sun.jersey.spi.container.servlet.ServletContainer</servlet-class>
    <init-param>
      <param-name>com.sun.jersey.config.property.packages</param-name>
      <param-value>test</param-value>      
    </init-param>
    <init-param>
        <param-name>com.sun.jersey.api.json.POJOMappingFeature</param-name>
        <param-value>true</param-value>
    </init-param>
    <load-on-startup>1</load-on-startup>
  </servlet>
  <servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>Jersey REST Service</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/api/*</url-pattern>
  </servlet-mapping>
 </web-app> 
share|improve this question
    
Could you add (parts) of the resulting JSON, the thrown exception (if any) or somethink like that? –  nutlike Mar 14 '13 at 13:45
    
@nutlike I have added part of the resulting JSON and the thrown exception (which I believe is because of the existing loop)... –  bbkglb Mar 14 '13 at 15:12
    
I never used Jersey so my random guess would be that all Jackson annotations are ignored in your project. Could you verify (or disprove) that with a smaller example? From what i read so far your web.xml could be of interest in this case, maybe you should add this to your question, too. –  nutlike Mar 14 '13 at 15:37
1  
Well, it seems to be a problem with the version of Jackson I'm using, cause when I use the 1.9.2 version, the JsonManagedReference and JsonBackReference annotations work but the resulting JSON is "{"value":1}" which is not good because it's ignoring the Parent completely... –  bbkglb Mar 14 '13 at 15:52

2 Answers 2

You say you're using Jackson 2.1.4 but the stacktrace shows Jackson with packages starting with "org.codehaus.jackson" which is is the base package for Jackson 1.x. The base package for Jackson 2.x is "com.fasterxml.jackson". Jersey is therefore configured with Jackson 1.x (most likely 1.9.2, as is the default in Jersey 1.17). My guess is that you're annotating your code with Annotations imported from Jackson 2.x but the Jackson library used by Jersey is unaware of those and so fails to serialize.

Your code works well for me with Jackson 2.3.0.

share|improve this answer

For a two-way linkage between fields you should have a look at the @JsonManagedReference and @JsonBackReference annotations. I do not think that this behaviour can be reached with the @JsonIdentifyInfo at all.

public class Parent {

private long value;
@JsonManagedReference private Set<Child> childs = new HashSet<Child>(0);

public long getValue() {
    return this.value;
}

public void setValue(long value) {
    this.value = value;
}

public Set<Child> getChilds() {
    return this.childs;
}

public void setChilds(Set<Child> childs) {
    this.childs = childs;
}

}

public class Child {

private long value;
@JsonBackReference private Parent parent;

public long getValue() {
    return this.value;
}

public void setValue(long value) {
    this.value = value;
}

public Parent getParent() {
    return this.parent;
}

public void setParent(Parent parent) {
    this.parent = parent;
}

}

You can find more examples here.

share|improve this answer
5  
It should be possible with the @JsonIdentifyInfo annotation, according to this, it's the general solution since version 2.0... –  bbkglb Mar 14 '13 at 13:35
    
@user2102125: Thank you for the link, I did not know that. –  nutlike Mar 14 '13 at 13:43
    
hmmm, I can't get it to work with the JsonManagedReference and JsonBackReference annotations either, maybe there's something wrong with my project's configurations... –  bbkglb Mar 14 '13 at 15:09

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