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please help me in identifying the difference between adding WrappedString into hashSet like that:

public class WrappedString {
private String s;
 public WrappedString(String s) { this.s = s; }
 public static void main(String[] args) {
 HashSet<Object> hs = new HashSet<Object>();
 WrappedString ws1 = new WrappedString("aardvark");
 WrappedString ws2 = new WrappedString("aardvark");
 hs.add(ws1); hs.add(ws2);
 System.out.println(hs.size()); // outputs 2

   }

}

and the follwing:

public class WrappedString {
private String s;
 public WrappedString(String s) { this.s = s; }
 public static void main(String[] args) {
 HashSet<Object> hs = new HashSet<Object>();
 String s1 = new String("aardvark");
 String s2 = new String("aardvark");
 hs.add(s1); hs.add(s2);
 System.out.println(hs.size()); // outputs 1
   }

}

i know that any object exists inside hashSet only once and the two instances of type WrappedString is considered to be different variables although they have the same value but why it treats the two instances of type String differently (one instance only is stored although they are two different objects)?

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What is WrappedString? –  default locale Mar 14 '13 at 12:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The main difference is that String implements equals whereas your WrappedString does not. So from a HashSet perspective, you can add as many new String("aardvark") as you want, they will all be considered the same (because new String("aardvark").equals(new String("aardvark")) is true) and only one will be added.

Whereas two different WrappedString instances will not be equal, even if the strings they contain are equal (because new WrappedString("aardvark").equals(new WrappedString("aardvark")) is false), so the set will not consider them as duplicates.

If you want a behaviour similar to String, you need to implement equals and hashcode in your WrappedString class.

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override equals and hashcode method in WrappedString class then it will behave the way you are expecting. WrappedString are different object even if those obejcts contains same string object. Add hashcode and equals like given below.

public class WrappedString {
    private String s;

    public WrappedString(String s) {
        this.s = s;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        HashSet<Object> hs = new HashSet<Object>();
        WrappedString ws1 = new WrappedString("aardvark");
        WrappedString ws2 = new WrappedString("aardvark");
        hs.add(ws1);
        hs.add(ws2);
        System.out.println(hs.size()); // outputs 2

    }
    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        WrappedString ws = (WrappedString)obj;
        return this.s.equals(ws.s);
    }
    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return this.s.hashCode();
    }

}

now size of the hashset will be 1.

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consider the 'equals' method. for strings: new String("aardvark").equals(new String("aardvark")) will return true, and the hash set will not add two equal instances. On your wrapper you didn't implemented the equals method, so addresses are compared and the two instances aren't equal- so they are both inserted to the set.

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