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I have a variable as

string="ABC400p2q4".

how can I separate ABC400 and p2q4. I need to separate it in two variables in such a way that as a result I get

echo $var1
ABC400
echo $var2
p2q4

In place of ABC there can be any alphabetic characters; in place of 400 there can be any other digits; but p and q are fixed and in place of 2 and 4 as well there can be any digit.

share|improve this question
1  
What shell? There are at least a few dozen. – Joey Mar 14 '13 at 12:58
    
What about other values; what are the criteria for splitting? Is it the first 6 characters and last 4 characters (but what happens if the length isn't 10)? Is it ABC plus 3 digits vs trailing material? Is it 3 upper case letters, 3 digits, and the trailing material? Is it split before the first 'p'? For your stated task: var1=ABC400; var2=p2q4 does the job, no muss, no fuss. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 14 '13 at 13:00
1  
too little information. is there any pattern/rule of your string? – Kent Mar 14 '13 at 13:00
    
In place of ABC there can be any albhabet, in place of 400 there can be any other digits bt p and q are fixed and in place of 2 and 3 as well there can be any digit. – user1468315 Mar 14 '13 at 13:03
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No need to split based on a regexp pattern as they are fixed length substrings. In pure bash you would do:

$ string="ABC400p2q4"

$ var1=${string:0:6}

$ var2=${string:6}

$ echo $var1
ABC400

$ echo $var2
p2q4
share|improve this answer

Try doing this

using & process substitution (non fixed length) :

read var1 var2 < <(sed -r 's/^[a-zA-Z]+[0-9]+/& /' <<< 'ABC400p2q4')

or this using a here-string

read var1 var2 <<< $(sed -r 's/^[a-zA-Z]+[0-9]+/& /' <<< 'ABC400p2q4')

or with the short sed substitution version from Kent

's/([0-9])p/\1 p/'

Note

& in the sed command stands for the matching left part of the substitution s///

Output

$ echo $var1
ABC400
$ echo $var2
p2q4
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the space idea. from his description, I think this works too? sed -r 's/([0-9])p/\1 p/' – Kent Mar 14 '13 at 13:18
    
Like in Perl, there's more that one way to do it =) Added your solution too – Gilles Quenot Mar 14 '13 at 13:28

Using and special BASH_REMATCH array (non fixed length) :

$ string='ABC400p2q4'
$ [[ $string =~ ^([a-zA-Z]+[0-9]+)(.*) ]]
$ echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
ABC400
$ echo ${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
p2q4
share|improve this answer

The answer provided by sudo_O is perfect if your strings stay single length. But, if that isn't the case, bash does provide you with string regex matching builtins.

$ string="ABC400p2q4"

$ var1=$( expr match "$string" '\(.{6}\)' )

$ var2=$( expr match "$string" '.*\(.{4}\)' )

Replace the regex with whatever you actually need.

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