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So, you are given 10 numbers and your are supposed to choose 5 numbers out of those so that the sum is 100.

Now, I obviously tried to solve it using a program and got the obvious solution with five loops. But I just wanted to know is there any efficient way to do this?

Here is Mr. Obvious :

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int[] a = { 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, 38 };
            for (int f = 0; f < a.Length - 4; f++)
            {
                for (int s = f+1; s < a.Length - 3; s++)
                {
                    for (int t = s+1; t < a.Length - 2; t++)
                    {
                        for (int fr = t + 1; fr < a.Length - 1; fr++)
                        {
                            for (int ft = fr + 1; ft < a.Length; ft++)
                            {
                                int sum = a[f] + a[s] + a[t] + a[fr] + a[ft];
                                Console.WriteLine(sum);
                                if (sum == 100)
                                {
                                    Console.WriteLine("---------------------------------------");
                                    Console.WriteLine(a[f]);
                                    Console.WriteLine(a[s]);
                                    Console.WriteLine(a[t]);
                                    Console.WriteLine(a[fr]);
                                    Console.WriteLine(a[ft]);
                                    Console.WriteLine("---------------------------------------");
                                }
                            }

                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
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marked as duplicate by Hovercraft Full Of Eels, nemesv, Mike, Soner Gönül, Michael Perrenoud Mar 14 '13 at 13:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

18  
You forgot python tag.. –  Soner Gönül Mar 14 '13 at 13:26
4  
Seems like a job for dynamic programming. Maybe a variation of the Knapsack problem? –  Óscar López Mar 14 '13 at 13:26
2  
Possible dup? stackoverflow.com/questions/4632322/… and they cover almost all the languages in this one, although I did not see C++ –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 14 '13 at 13:27
6  
If you tag every language, you probably meant to just tag it with algorithm and make it language agnostic. –  Mike Mar 14 '13 at 13:29
3  
I don't see a reason for those snobbish comments, this is a generic CS problem, language agnostic. To OP: This is an NP-Complete problem and whatever way you solve it, you'll get exponential complexity. Unless you use some sort of approximation algorithm of course. –  user1773602 Mar 14 '13 at 13:29

2 Answers 2

You can use combinations. Check out this question: creating all possible k combinations of n items in C++

In this case you have n numbers, and k indices of numbers to choose from.

This should cut the number of iterations down.

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Here some optimization-ideas:

  • If all numbers are positive, you can skip inner loops, of the sum is already >= 100
  • you can reduce the calculations by calculating partial sums in each loop (values of outer loops do not change while running the inner loops).
  • calculate a.Length only once and store it because this value never changes

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] a = { 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, 38 };
        int lenA=a.Length;
        int alenMinus4=lenA-4,
        int alenMinus3=lenA-3,
        int alenMinus2=lenA-2,
        int alenMinus1=lenA-1,
    
        for (int f = 0; f < alenMinus4; f++)
        {   int sum1=a[f];
            if(sum1>100)
            { f=alenMinus4;
            }
            else
            {   for (int s = f+1; s < alenMinus3; s++)
                {   int sum2=sum1+ a[s];
                    if(sum2>100)
                    { s=alenMinus3;
                    }
                    else
                    {   for (int t = s+1; t < alenMinus2; t++)
                        {   int sum3=sum2+ a[t];
                            if(sum3>100)
                            { t=alenMinus2;
                            }
                            else
                            {   for (int fr = t + 1; fr < alenMinus1; fr++)
                                {   int sum4=sum3+ a[fr];
                                    if(sum4>100)
                                    { fr=alenMinus1;
                                    }
                                    else
                                    {  for (int ft = fr + 1; ft < lenA; ft++)
                                        {   int sum = sum4 + a[ft];
                                            Console.WriteLine(sum);
                                            if (sum == 100)
                                            {   Console.WriteLine("---------------------------------------");       
                                                Console.WriteLine(a[f]);
                                                Console.WriteLine(a[s]);
                                                Console.WriteLine(a[t]);
                                                Console.WriteLine(a[fr]);
                                                Console.WriteLine(a[ft]);
                                                Console.WriteLine("---------------------------------------");
        }   }   }   }   }   }   }   }   }   }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Hopefully the compiler can do your optimizations 2) and 3), and only 1) requires any new code. –  Marc Glisse Mar 14 '13 at 13:35
    
@Marc Glisse: The compilor might [I would not count on it] make the optimization 3) [If it is smart enough to detect that this never changes]. I bet the compilor will not detect that parts of the sum a[f] + a[s] + a[t] + a[fr] + a[ft] can be moved to the outer loops. And as you agreed on, the 1) optimization, which will increase the speed the most, will need human change of code. –  MrSmith42 Mar 14 '13 at 13:46

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