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I have Table2 with a foreign key to Table1. I want to create a trigger that automatically update Table2 when Table1 is updated. Here is what's on my mind:

create trigger MyTrigger on Table1 instead of update as
if UPDATE(Table1_ID)
begin
    declare @OldID as int, @NewID as int;
    select @OldID=P_ID from deleted;
    select @NewID=P_ID from inserted;

    update Table2 set Table1_ID=@NewID where Table2.Table1_ID=@OldID;
    update Table1 set Table1_ID=@NewID where Table1_ID=@OldID;
end

It didn't work as I received an error from SQL Server indicating that there was a conflict with the foreign key constraint. So I modified it a bit:

create trigger MyTrigger on Table1 instead of update as
if UPDATE(Table1_ID)
begin
    declare @OldID as int, @NewID as int;
    select @OldID=P_ID from deleted;
    select @NewID=P_ID from inserted;

    update Table2 set Table1_ID=null where Table2.Table1_ID=@OldID;
    update Table1 set Table1_ID=@NewID where Table1_ID=@OldID;
    update Table2 set Table1_ID=@NewID where Table1_ID=null;
end

It works. But pre-existing null values from Table2 are obviously lost if the trigger runs. What is the correct way to do this? Note that I already know of the cascading option when creating table. I just want to do it using trigger. Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Your trigger (either one) is broken. inserted and deleted can contain multiple rows. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 14 '13 at 14:40
    
I know. To make that simple, I'm assuming that only a single row is updated. –  Livy Mar 14 '13 at 16:08
    
Thats not making things simple. That's making a broken trigger. What happens if/when you have another issue and someone suggests a solution that involves a multi-row update? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 15 '13 at 7:53
    
And there's no real clean way to do this - as you've indicated, there's a built in facility (cascades). If SQL Server offered deferred constraints (as some other database systems do), then option 1 would have been close to a correct way to implement it. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Mar 15 '13 at 14:39

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