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I have a simple class that contains a pointer to one of it's own members:

struct X {
    int val;
    int* pVal;
    X(int v) : val(v), pVal(&val) {}
}

X x(1);

I have some code like this:

void foo() {
    doStuffWith(x);
    x = X(2); // completely discard the old value of X, and start again
    doStuffWith(x);
}

I'm worried that when x is reassigned, x.pVal will invalidly point to the member of the temporary X(2) if return value optimization does not occur.

I realize I could write a copy constructor to fix this. However, it seems wasteful to do the copy in the first place, rather than constructing the object in the right spot in memory to begin with.


Is it reasonable to use the placement new operator here? Or does this have unintented consequences for destructors?

void foo() {
    doStuffWith(x);
    new (&x) X(2); // completely discard the old value of X, and start again
    doStuffWith(x);
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the reasoning for storing a pointer to a member variable, along with the member variable? This would all be easier if you just provided an accessor to the member variable to get it as a pointer if necessary. – Chad Mar 14 '13 at 14:56
    
@Chad: the pointer is actually a view into an array, but that's not too important - I'd still like to know how to do an in place construction instead of a copy. – Eric Mar 14 '13 at 14:57
    
@Angew: My worry is that the lack of RVO would cause a problem. – Eric Mar 14 '13 at 14:58
1  
Write a copy constructor and copy assignment operator. – Chad Mar 14 '13 at 14:59
1  
Just write the correct assignment operator (and the move version if you can use C++11), and see what actually happens with optimization turned on. Do something tricksy only if the compiler doesn't do it for you. – Useless Mar 14 '13 at 15:01

The most obvious (and probably most effective) way to make this work is to provide copy assignment and copy construction operators to "do the right thing", something on this general order:

struct X {
    int val;
    int* pVal;

    X(int v) : val(v), pVal(&val) {}   
    X(X const &other) : val(other.val), pVal(&val) {} 

    // pVal was already set by ctor, so just ignore it:
    X &operator=(X const &other) { val = other.val; return *this; }

    // and allow assignment directly from an int:
    X &operator=(int n) { val = n; return *this; }
};

Then the rest of the code can just copy/assign X objects without jumping through hoops to prevent corruption.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is the way to go. – Alex Chamberlain Mar 14 '13 at 15:23
2  
Surprise - the assignment operator does less work that a placement new. :-) – Bo Persson Mar 14 '13 at 15:27
    
This is slightly complicated by the fact that val is actually an array – Eric Mar 14 '13 at 15:35
    
@Eric: Maybe, but not drastically. In any case, you should probably make it a vector instead of an array, so (for example) you'll be able to support move assignment/construction along with copying. Especially if it's large, moving can be a big win. – Jerry Coffin Mar 14 '13 at 15:37

No

It won't destruct the old value of x, but you're right the the default copy assignment operator won't do what you want either.

share|improve this answer
1  
. . . unless he destructs it first. – Ethereal Mar 14 '13 at 14:54
    
@Ethereal: So it would be fine if I added x.~X() before the placement new? Is there a more idiomatic way to write this? – Eric Mar 14 '13 at 14:56
    
@Eric Write a custom assignment operator. – Alex Chamberlain Mar 14 '13 at 14:58
    
@AlexChamberlain: I realize it has next to no effect on performance, but I'd prefer not to have to create one X only to have to copy all of it's members to a new location, when I could just completely overwrite the old one. – Eric Mar 14 '13 at 15:01
1  
You're assuming the compiler won't do this for you. Why? – Useless Mar 14 '13 at 15:06

For me it seems quite acceptable solution if X's destructor will be called before placement new. It's syntactically allowed even the destructor is not actually specified for the class.

struct X {
  int val;
  int* pVal;
  X(int v) : val(v), pVal(&val) {}
};

X x(1);

void foo() {
  doStuffWith(x);
  x.~X();
  new (&x) X(2); 
  doStuffWith(x);
}

In this form it is a correct way to reuse memory for any object (but only if the object's ctor can't throw! otherwise UB may happen on program shutdown, i.e. double call of the destructor).

Indeed, the equality of pointers passed and returned from placement new in it non-array form is guaranteed by the standard:

18.6.1.3 Placement forms

...

void* operator new(std::size_t size, void* ptr) noexcept;

Returns: ptr.

Remarks: Intentionally performs no other action.

(and the result of the conversion to void* and then back to the same pointer type is also guaranteed to be the same as the source pointer)

However, to avoid non-proper use of the class it would be more safe either define copy assignment and copy constructor or declare this class as noncopyable (with deleted ones)

And only the last (noncopyable) case may be regarded as a reason for using placement new.

Although I'm far from promoting placement new for general use, it express the intention to reuse object memory directly and doesn't rely on any optimization. Copy constructor and copy assignment are, of course, more safe, but don't express this intention excactly: no "copy" actually needed, the new object should be constructed in place of the old one.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 There are constructs in C++ to do this properly; why rely on the user instead? – Alex Chamberlain Mar 14 '13 at 15:24
1  
@Alex: other constructs such copy ctor/assignments burden the class with unnecessary things.The class shouldn't be responsible for reusing of object's memory. It may be noncopyable at all for some reasons. – user396672 Mar 14 '13 at 15:29

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