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public class Test2 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

         if(args.length < 2) {
             System.err.println("Error !!");
             System.exit(1);    
        }
          float distance = Float.parseFloat(args[0]);
          float time = Float.parseFloat(args[1]);

          System.out.print("Velocity = " );
          System.out.print(distance / time);
          System.out.print(" m/s ");
        }   
}

How can I make variables constant?
Constant distance = 10;
Constant time = 5;

Thank Everyone!

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closed as not a real question by radai, Luiggi Mendoza, Reimeus, Pragnani, Bhesh Gurung Mar 14 '13 at 14:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Add final to the variable declaration: final float distance = ... –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 14 '13 at 14:55
4  
Please explain what you're trying to achieve. As it stands, the question is rather cryptic. –  NPE Mar 14 '13 at 14:56
2  
@AliAlamiri: Well I certainly don't understand "How do I need to set constants?" - what do you understand by that question? –  Jon Skeet Mar 14 '13 at 14:58
3  
Wow that was a fast closure. 4 minutes? Give the guy a chance to explain! –  Boann Mar 14 '13 at 14:58
1  
@Boann - Agreed, it's actually a bit harsh. sorry op –  Coffee Mar 14 '13 at 15:00

4 Answers 4

final float distance = Float.parseFloat(args[0]);
final float time = Float.parseFloat(args[1]);
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YOu can try something liek this:-

public static final int x= 11;
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Just declare them.

  public class Test2 {
        public static final float distance = 10;
        public static final float time = 5;
        public static void main(String[] args) {

             if(args.length < 2) {
                 System.err.println("Error !!");
                 System.exit(1);    
            }
              float distance = Float.parseFloat(args[0]);
              float time = Float.parseFloat(args[1]);

              System.out.print("Velocity = " );
              System.out.print(distance / time);
              System.out.print(" m/s ");
            }   
    }
share|improve this answer
    
// No change source code . :) –  Kent Mar 14 '13 at 14:57
    
Look close at the beginning my friend: public static final float distance = 10; public static final float time = 5; –  Marcelo Tataje Mar 14 '13 at 14:59
    
yes, you changed the source codes. :D the weird requirement... :) –  Kent Mar 14 '13 at 15:00
    
oh, btw, I am not the downvoter...:) –  Kent Mar 14 '13 at 15:00

This is done using the final keyword

public static final int distance = 10

then you can just use the distance wherever you need 10 ( src )

also see: private final static attribute vs private final attribute

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1  
It's final not FINAL. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 14 '13 at 14:55
    
I try . thank.. –  aca Mar 14 '13 at 14:56
1  
You can't declare public nor static variables inside a method. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 14 '13 at 14:57

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