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I'm kinda puzzled here while creating a custom Progress DialogFragment. Everything works fine but since I don't want the user to "go back" until the DialogFragment is dismissed, I'm trying to capture the KeyEvent and "disable".

While this works great:

    @Override
public ProgressDialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

    final ProgressDialog dialog = new ProgressDialog(getActivity());
    dialog.setMessage(getString(R.string.loading_text));
    dialog.setIndeterminate(true);
    dialog.setCancelable(false);

    // Disable the back button
    OnKeyListener keyListener = new OnKeyListener() {

        @Override
        public boolean onKey(DialogInterface dialog, int keyCode,
                KeyEvent event) {
            if( keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK){  
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }
    };
    dialog.setOnKeyListener(keyListener);
    return dialog;
}

Using onCreateDialog does not let me inflate the Fragment correctly and thus, customize the look&feel of my Fragment. onCreateDialog, on the other hand, captures back key pressed event perfectly. When switching to onCreateView:

@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    //Inflate the XML view for the help dialog fragment
    View view = inflater.inflate(R.layout.progress_dialog_fragment, container);
    TextView text = (TextView)view.findViewById(R.id.loadingMessage);
    text.setText(Html.fromHtml(getString(R.string.loading_text)));

    // Disable the back button
    android.view.View.OnKeyListener keyListener = new android.view.View.OnKeyListener() {

        @Override
        public boolean onKey(View view, int keyCode, KeyEvent event) {
            if( keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK){  
                return true;
            }
                return false;
        }
    };
    view.setOnKeyListener(keyListener);

    // request a window without the title
    getDialog().getWindow().requestFeature(Window.FEATURE_NO_TITLE);
    //Transparent Dialog background
    getDialog().getWindow().setBackgroundDrawable(new ColorDrawable(0));
    return view;
}

The event is not getting captured. This leads me to another question...since I've seen using onCreateDialog and onCreateView in distinctively in many SO questions...what is the difference between the two really?

Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

onCreateDialog vs onCreateView:

Implementations should override this class and implement onCreateView(LayoutInflater, ViewGroup, Bundle) to supply the content of the dialog. Alternatively, they can override onCreateDialog(Bundle) to create an entirely custom dialog, such as an AlertDialog, with its own content.

Important when using onCreateDialog:

Override to build your own custom Dialog container. This is typically used to show an AlertDialog instead of a generic Dialog; when doing so, onCreateView(LayoutInflater, ViewGroup, Bundle) does not need to be implemented since the AlertDialog takes care of its own content.

Example Dialog (In this case an AlertDialog):

public static class MyAlertDialogFragment extends DialogFragment {

    public static MyAlertDialogFragment newInstance(int title) {
        MyAlertDialogFragment frag = new MyAlertDialogFragment();
        Bundle args = new Bundle();
        args.putInt("title", title);
        frag.setArguments(args);
        return frag;
    }

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        int title = getArguments().getInt("title");

        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity())
                .setIcon(R.drawable.alert_dialog_icon)
                .setTitle(title)
                .setCanceble(false)
                .setPositiveButton(R.string.alert_dialog_ok,
                    new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int whichButton) {
                            ((FragmentAlertDialog)getActivity()).doPositiveClick();
                        }
                    }
                )
                .setNegativeButton(R.string.alert_dialog_cancel,
                    new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                        public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int whichButton) {
                            ((FragmentAlertDialog)getActivity()).doNegativeClick();
                        }
                    }
                )
                .create();
    }
} 

The property setCanceble(boolean) states whether you can exit the Dialog with a back press. No need to catch the KEYCODE_BACK anywhere.

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Hello Martjin, and what about doing the same when a View is created instead of a Dialog. From your first paragraph I assume onCreateView is what I need, not onCreateDialog... –  AlejandroVK Mar 14 '13 at 15:16
    
Nevermind, I'm calling setCancellable from the Activity that shows the Dialog, thanks for pointing it out Martijin! Correct answer + upvote :) –  AlejandroVK Mar 14 '13 at 15:27
1  
This does not work. You have to call setCancelable(boolean) on the DialogFragment, not on the Dialog which is what you are doing now. –  Daniel Mar 24 at 18:03
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 DialogFragment newFragment = YourFragment.newInstance();
                newFragment.setCancelable(false);
                newFragment.show(fragmentTransaction, "dialog");

Add setCancelable(false) before you .Show() the fragment

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GREAT tip. And here's an important further point on that stackoverflow.com/a/16480564/294884 –  Joe Blow Jun 5 at 8:19
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