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I've got a Linq To Sql query (or with brackets) here that works on my local SQL2008, in about 00:00:00s - 00:00:01s, but on the remote server, it takes around 00:02:10s. There's about 56k items in dbo.Movies, dbo.Boxarts, and 300k in dbo.OmdbEntries

{SELECT
//pull distinct t_meter out of the created object
Distinct2.t_Meter AS t_Meter
//match all movie data on the same movie_id
FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT
        Extent2.t_Meter AS t_Meter
        FROM    dbo.Movies AS Extent1
        INNER JOIN dbo.OmdbEntries AS Extent2 ON Extent1.movie_ID = Extent2.movie_ID
        INNER JOIN dbo.BoxArts AS Extent3 ON Extent1.movie_ID = Extent3.movie_ID
        //pull the genres matched on movie_ids
        INNER JOIN  (SELECT DISTINCT
                Extent4.movie_ID AS movie_ID
                FROM  dbo.MovieToGenres AS Extent4
                //all genres matched on movie ids
                INNER JOIN dbo.Genres AS Extent5 ON Extent4.genre_ID = Extent5.genre_ID ) AS Distinct1 ON Distinct1.movie_ID = Extent1.movie_ID
        WHERE 1 = 1
//sort the t_meters by ascending
)  AS Distinct2
ORDER BY Distinct2.t_Meter ASC}

The inner query first takes all the related items in the tables and then creates a new object, then from that object, find only the t_Meters that aren't null. Then from those t_Meters, select only the distinct items and then sort them, to return a list of 98 or so ints.

I don't know enough about SQL Databases yet or not to intuitively know whether or not that that's an extreme set of db calls to put into a single query, but since it only takes a second or less on my local server, I thought it was alright.


edit: Here's the LINQ code that I haven't really cleaned up at all: http://pastebin.com/JUkdjHDJ It's messy, but it gets the job done... The fix I found was calling ToArray after OrderBy, but before Distinct helped out immensely. So instead of

 var results = IQueryableWithDBDatasTMeter.Distinct().OrderBy().ToArray()

I did

var orderedResults = IQueryableWithDBDatasTMeter.OrderBy().ToArray()
var distinctOrderedResults = orderedResults.Distinct().ToArray()

I'm sure had I linked the Linq code (and cleaned it up) rather than the autogenerated SQL query, you would have been able to solve this easily, sorry about that.

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Could you check what querys are been executed on the server? ( in what querys this is translated ) –  Gabriel Monteiro Nepomuceno Mar 14 '13 at 19:58
    
@GabrielMonteiroNepomuceno I don't quite understand, but if you mean using the Activity Monitor, I'm not able to access it due to permissions. Do you mean show you the Linq To SQL that created this query? –  TankorSmash Mar 14 '13 at 20:14
    
If you are using Visual studio ultimate and you open The intelletrace and you will see there all the queries that are been insued agains you database. If you don't have visual studio ultimate the easy way for you to do that is to use a profiles on your local database to see what queries your application is making. I think the problem is with n+1 queries. –  Gabriel Monteiro Nepomuceno Mar 15 '13 at 10:50
    
Does the remote server have exactly the same schema, including index definitions? Can you check that the execution plans are the same (in Sql Server Management Studio) for your local machine and the remote server? You might also try to split the query into three single ones and see whether that helps (or at least then you know which part takes such a long time). –  Gorgsenegger Mar 15 '13 at 10:52
    
Might be helpful if you post the Linq Query, otherwise you should tag it SQL rather than Linq. Also why is the query performing joins to BoxArts and Genres which don't appear to be used. Is this simply to exclude records without related records? –  sgmoore Mar 15 '13 at 10:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here's the LINQ code that I haven't really cleaned up at all: http://pastebin.com/JUkdjHDJ It's messy, but it gets the job done... The fix I found was calling ToArray after OrderBy, but before Distinct helped out immensely. So instead of

 var results = IQueryableWithDBDatasTMeter.Distinct().OrderBy().ToArray()

I did

var orderedResults = IQueryableWithDBDatasTMeter.OrderBy().ToArray()
var distinctOrderedResults = orderedResults.Distinct().ToArray()

I guess it works because it's running the Distinct only against the Array in memory, rather than the entire DB's worth of entries? I'm not really sure though, since the old LINQ works flawlessly on my local server.

I'm sure had I linked the Linq code (and cleaned it up) rather than the autogenerated SQL query, you would have been able to solve this easily, sorry about that.

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