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I have to create a simple vending machine program, where if the user inputs 2 tokens they get 1 can. I'm having a bit of trouble with the code - if I input 1 token and enter 'Y' I get the message "Thanks enjoy your drink" when it should really come up with an error.

import java.util.Scanner;
/**
 * Vending Machine
 * 
 * @author - 
 * @version 1.0
 */

public class VendingMachine
{

int cans = 10;
int token = 20;

public void fillUp (int cans)
{
    if(cans <= 0)
    {
        cans = cans+=10;            
    }

}

public void tokenIn (int token)
{
    Scanner scan = new Scanner (System.in);
    System.out.println("Do you want something to drink? (Y/N)");

    boolean tokenIN = false;
    if(scan.next().equals("Y"))
    {
        tokenIN = true;
    }
    else
    {
        tokenIN = false;
    } 

    if(tokenIN = true && token >= 2 && cans >=1)
    {
        cans--;
        token-=2;
        System.out.println("Thanks, enjoy your drink!");    
    }
    else
    {
        System.out.println("Goodbye");
    }

}

public void getTokenCount (int token)
{
    System.out.println(token);
}

public void getCansCount (int cans)
{
    System.out.println(cans); 
}
}
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One problem that I see is on the following line:

if(tokenIN = true && token >= 2 && cans >=1)

You're using the assignment operator (=) where you should be using the equality operator (==). You really don't need an operator at all when your argument is boolean. if (tokenIN) will evaluate the same as if(tokenIN == true), so that line could be shortened to:

if(tokenIN && token >= 2 && cans >= 1)

Note: The original statement if(tokenIN = true && ... will always evaluate to true because of the assignment to true and the && operator's short-circuit logic.

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oh okay stupid mistake, thanks a lot! –  user1554786 Mar 14 '13 at 15:18
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The issue itself:

if(tokenIN = true && token >= 2 && cans >=1)

should be:

if(tokenIN == true && token >= 2 && cans >=1)

if you want to do an equals operator. And since tokenIN is already a boolean you can just do:

if(tokenIN && token >= 2 && cans >=1)

Some other suggestions for your code:

Replace: cans = cans+=10; with cans += 10;

It is better to always put the constants in front when doing operations such as equals to prevent exceptions. Replace scan.next().equals("Y") with "Y".equals(scan.next())

And you can just replace your if\else with:

tokenIN = "Y".equals(scan.next());

Since equals already evaluates to a boolean.

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