Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

(First of all "bind" in the question has nothing to do with std::bind)

I have watched the Expected<T> talk and I thought the presentation on the history of this technique was missing the core idea behind this thing in Haskell.

The core idea in Haskell is that you "never" acess the value of an Expected<T>. What you do instead is pass a lambda to the Expected<T> that will either be applied or not depending on the state of the Expected<T>.

I would have expected this "bind" combinator to be the main method that Expected<T> would be used, so I have to ask if this programming style has been rejected for some reason. I'll call that combinator then in the following:

template <class T> class Expected<T> {
    ....
    template <class V, class F> Expected<V> then(F fun_) {
       if (!valid()) {
           return Expected<V>::fromException(this(??)); // something like that
       }
       return fun_(get());
    }
}

The point of this combinator is to chain a list of functions where you don't need to check for errors, and where the first function that fails will short-circuit the evaluation.

auto res = Expected<Foo>::fromCode([]() { return callFun1(...); })
             .then([](Baz& val) { return callFun2(..,val,..); })
             .then([](Bar& val) { return callFun3(val,...); });

Or this syntax which is starting to resemble the >>= operator that is used in Haskell.

auto res = []() { return callFun1(...); }
           >> [](Baz& val) { return callFun2(..,val,..); }
           >> [](Bar& val) { return callFun3(val,...); };    

callFun1 returns a Expected<Baz>, callFun2 returns a Expected<Bar>, and callFun3 returns a Expected<Foo>.

As you can see, this code doesn't check for errors. Errors will stop execution, but they still have all the advantages of Expected<T>. This is the standard way to use the Either monad in Haskell.

As I said, surely someone must have looked at this.

Edit: I wrote wrong return types for callFun{1..3}. They return Expected<T>, not T for various values of T. This is sort of the whole point of the then or >> combinator.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Passing normal functions to function templates (say, your .then) in C++, as opposed to Haskell, is extremely frustrating. You have to provide an explicit type signature for them if they're overloaded or templates. This is ugly and doesn't lend itself to monadic computation chains.

Also, our current lambdas are monomorphic, you have to explicitly type out the parameter types, which makes this whole situation even worse.

There have been many (library) tries to make functional programming in C++ easier, but it always comes back down to those two points.

Last but not least, functional-style programming in C++ isn't the norm and there are many people to whom that concept is completely alien, while a "return code"-like concept is easy to understand.

(Note that your .then function template's V parameter has to be specified explicitly, but that is relatively easy fixable.)

share|improve this answer
    
Could you expand the answer with an example of the best-possible syntax that one can get in C++ for this? –  user239558 Mar 14 '13 at 16:08
    
@user: some_expected.then(static_cast<R(*)(Args...)>(&some_overloaded_function)), or with lambdas, which, as they're monomorphic, can be seen as a cast in disguise. :| –  Xeo Mar 14 '13 at 16:17
    
this is kind of a bit over my head, but both of you might wanna check out bartosz's lecture : youtube.com/watch?v=ph7qt0pkPkc disclaimer: like many many times when it comes to FP I had a feeling: either this isnt that special or Im missing something –  NoSenseEtAl Mar 14 '13 at 19:12
    
@NoSenseEtAl : You're missing something. ;-D –  ildjarn Mar 19 '13 at 20:23

Answering my own question to give some more information and document my experiment:

I mutilated Expected<T>. What I did was rename get() to thenReturn() to discourage its use through naming. I renamed the whole thing either<T>.

And then I added the then(...) function. I don't think the result is that bad (except for probably lots of bugs), but I must point out that then isn't monadic bind. The monadic bind is a variant of function composition, so you operate on two functions and return a function. then simply applies a function to an either, if possible.

What we get is

// Some template function we want to run.
// Notice that all our functions return either<T>, so it
// is "discouraged" to access the wrapped return value directly.
template <class T>
auto square(T num) -> either<T> 
{
    std::cout << "square\n";
    return num*num;
}

// Some fixed-type function we want to run.
either<double> square2(int num) 
{
    return num*num;
}

// Example of a style of programming.
int doit() 
{
    using std::cout;
    using std::string;
    auto fun1 = [] (int x)    -> either<int>    { cout << "fun1\n"; throw "Some error"; };
    auto fun2 = [] (int x)    -> either<string> { cout << "fun2\n"; return string("string"); };
    auto fun3 = [] (string x) -> either<int>    { cout << "fun3\n"; return 53; };
    int r = either<int>(1)
        .then([] (int x)    -> either<double> { return x + 1; })
        .then([] (double x) -> either<int>    { return x*x; })
        .then(fun2) // here we transform to string and back to int.
        .then(fun3)
        .then(square<int>)  // need explicit disambiguation
        .then(square2)
        .thenReturn();
    auto r2 = either<int>(1)
        .then(fun1)  // exception thrown here
        .then(fun2)  // we can apply other functions,
        .then(fun3); // but they will be ignored
    try {
        // when we access the value, it throws an exception.
        cout << "returned : " << r2.thenReturn();
    } catch (...) {
        cout << "ouch, exception\n";
    }
    return r;
}

Here is a full example:

#include <exception>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include <type_traits>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <utility>

template <class T> class either {
    union {
        T ham;
        std::exception_ptr spam;
    };
    bool got_ham;
    either() {}
    // we're all friends here
    template<typename> friend class either;
public:
    typedef T HamType;
    //either(const T& rhs) : ham(rhs), got_ham(true) {}
    either(T&& rhs) : ham(std::move(rhs)), got_ham(true) {}
    either(const either& rhs) : got_ham(rhs.got_ham) {
        if (got_ham) {
            new(&ham) T(rhs.ham);
        } else {
            new(&spam) std::exception_ptr(rhs.spam);
        }
    }
    either(either&& rhs) : got_ham(rhs.got_ham) {
        if (got_ham) {
            new(&ham) T(std::move(rhs.ham));
        } else {
            new(&spam) std::exception_ptr(std::move(rhs.spam));
        }
    }
    ~either() {
        if (got_ham) {
            ham.~T();
        } else {
            spam.~exception_ptr();
        }
    }
    template <class E>
    static either<T> fromException(const E& exception) {
        if (typeid(exception) != typeid(E)) {
            throw std::invalid_argument("slicing detected");
        }
        return fromException(std::make_exception_ptr(exception));
    }
    template <class V>
    static either<V> fromException(std::exception_ptr p) {
        either<V> result;
        result.got_ham = false;
        new(&result.spam) std::exception_ptr(std::move(p));
        return result;
    }
    template <class V>
    static either<V> fromException() {
        return fromException<V>(std::current_exception());
    }
    template <class E> bool hasException() const {
        try {
            if (!got_ham) std::rethrow_exception(spam);
        } catch (const E& object) {
            return true;
        } catch (...) {
        }
        return false;
    }
    template <class F>
    auto then(F fun) const -> either<decltype(fun(ham).needed_for_decltype())> {
        typedef decltype(fun(ham).needed_for_decltype()) ResT;
        if (!got_ham) {
            either<ResT> result;
            result.got_ham = false;
            result.spam = spam;
            return result;
        }
        try {
            return fun(ham);
        } catch (...) {  
            return fromException<ResT>();
        }
    }
    T& thenReturn() {
        if (!got_ham) std::rethrow_exception(spam);
        return ham;
    }
    const T& thenReturn() const {
        if (!got_ham) std::rethrow_exception(spam);
        return ham;
    }
    T needed_for_decltype();
};

template <class T>
auto square(T num) -> either<T> 
{
    std::cout << "square\n";
    return num*num;
}

either<double> square2(int num) 
{
    return num*num;
}

int doit() 
{
    using std::cout;
    using std::string;
    auto fun1 = [] (int x)    -> either<int>    { cout << "fun1\n"; throw "Some error"; };
    auto fun2 = [] (int x)    -> either<string> { cout << "fun2\n"; return string("string"); };
    auto fun3 = [] (string x) -> either<int>    { cout << "fun3\n"; return 53; };
    int r = either<int>(1)
        .then([] (int x)    -> either<double> { return x + 1; })
        .then([] (double x) -> either<int>    { return x*x; })
        .then(fun2) // here we transform to string and back to int.
        .then(fun3)
        .then(square<int>)  // need explicit disambiguation
        .then(square2)
        .thenReturn();
    auto r2 = either<int>(1)
        .then(fun1)  // exception thrown here
        .then(fun2)  // we can apply other functions,
        .then(fun3); // but they will be ignored
    try {
        // when we access the value, it throws an exception.
        cout << "returned : " << r2.thenReturn();
    } catch (...) {
        cout << "ouch, exception\n";
    }
    return r;
}


int main() {
    using std::cout;
    doit();
    cout << "end. ok";
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.