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Having the working code below in C# 3.0, how can I convert it to C# 4.0 having substituted the line

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(LongGetOrAdd(dict, 1));

by

Task task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(//?

?

The complete code of working C# 3.0 console application:

using System.Collections.Concurrent;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
class Program
{
  static void Main()
  {
    var dict = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, string>();
    ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(LongGetOrAdd(dict, 1));

//???????
//Task task1 = Task.Factory.StartNew((Action)(LongGetOrAdd(dict, 1));

    Console.WriteLine("Press enter to continue:");
    foreach (var a in dict)
    Console.WriteLine("dict.Key = {0}  dict.Value = {1}  ", a.Key, a.Value);


    Console.ReadLine();
  }
  private static WaitCallback LongGetOrAdd(ConcurrentDictionary<int, string> dict, int index)
  {
    return o => dict.GetOrAdd
    (index, 
     i =>
       {
         Console.WriteLine("From method LongGetOrAdd()!");
         Thread.SpinWait(1000);
         return i.ToString();
       }
    );
  }
}

producing output:

Press enter to continue:
From method LongGetOrAdd()!

dict.Key = 1  dict.Value = 1
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do.

    var c = LongGetOrAdd(dict, 1);

    var t = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => c.Invoke(null));

    Task.WaitAll(task);
    Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this answer
1  
Look at the code. LongGetOrAdd creates a delegate it doesn't do the work. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 15:10
    
actually it shouldnt since its delegate. I edited .. so edited version should work but.. –  adt Mar 14 '13 at 15:15
    
@Servy didnt realized it. Now should work. I think. –  adt Mar 14 '13 at 15:16
    
@Servy, the method outputs the value "======!" to Console and fills the dictionary with key==1 and value=="======!". The intention was not to change functionality but just to change thread's launching and method call by Task.Factory.StartNew() equivalently –  Fulproof Mar 14 '13 at 17:28
1  
@Fulproof If you want to comment on my answer you should really comment on my answer rather than commenting on someone else's answer or editing a reply into the question. Next, my code doesn't change any functionality at all, it maintains the same functionality as your code, unlike this answer which actually changes the functionality by adding Task.WaitAll. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 17:30

You just need to change the type of delegate that LongGetOrAdd returns and call the other method.

You'll also need to remove the parameter from the lambda, since you're not actually passing in any information.

All of this is clearly indicated by the compiler/intellisense when simply looking at the signature of Task.Factory.StartNew.

private static Action LongGetOrAdd(ConcurrentDictionary<int, string> dict, int index)
{
    return () => dict.GetOrAdd
    (index,
     i =>
     {
         Console.WriteLine("======!");
         Thread.SpinWait(1000);
         return i.ToString();
     }
    );
}
private static void Main()
{
    var dict = new ConcurrentDictionary<int, string>();
    Task.Factory.StartNew(LongGetOrAdd(dict, 1));

    Console.WriteLine();
    Console.WriteLine("press any key to exit . . .");
    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this answer
    
it is indicated by Intellisense after it was correctly written once otherwise Intellisense gives a signature + 15 its overloads –  Fulproof Mar 14 '13 at 15:26
2  
@Fulproof If you were to simply change nothing other than the method name you would see a syntax error indicating the improper delegate type; you would simply need to change the delegate to the matching one. As for the overloads, simply start with the ones with the least parameters and move up as needed. In this case, you want one of the two one-parameter overloads. If you're particularly confused or curious, there's always Google with literally millions of examples. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 15:31
    
Servy, thanks but the intention was not changing method or any functionality in any way. The question did not ask this –  Fulproof Mar 14 '13 at 17:30
    
@Fulproof This answer does not change any functionality in any way; it results in identical functionality but through using the TPL classes rather than the System.Threading classes, which is exactly what you asked for. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 17:30
    
@Fulproof What did it change exactly? –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 17:33

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