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I have a line containing 3 numbers that I want to read from stdin with fmt.Scanln() but this code won't work:

X := make([]int, 3)
fmt.Scanln(X...)
fmt.Printf("%v\n", X)

I get this error message:

cannot use X (type []int) as type []interface {} in function argument

I don't get it.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For example,

package main

import "fmt"

func intScanln(n int) ([]int, error) {
    x := make([]int, n)
    y := make([]interface{}, len(x))
    for i := range x {
        y[i] = &x[i]
    }
    n, err := fmt.Scanln(y...)
    x = x[:n]
    return x, err
}

func main() {
    x, err := intScanln(3)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    fmt.Printf("%v\n", x)
}

Input:

1 2 3

Output:

[1 2 3]
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why doesn't this result in the output [3, 3, 3]? x would be intialized with 0 which all points to the same address when I tested in a main func. –  dskinner Mar 14 '13 at 18:06
    
I see, the address of &x[i] is unique but if iterating with for i, v := range x { ...}, the address of v is not unique. –  dskinner Mar 14 '13 at 18:19
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This error message occurs b/c there's no reasonable way to convert []int to []interface{}. Note, this is in reference to a slice. So the syntax your using is correct, but fmt.Scanln expects []interface{}. This has implications outside of pkg fmt.

The reason I've seen given for this is due to Go giving you control over memory layout so it currently has no reasonable way to do the slice conversion. This means you'll need to do the conversion manually before passing it to a function expecting the slice of a given type. For example:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    x := make([]int, 3)
    y := make([]interface{}, 3)
    y[0] = x[0]
    y[1] = x[1]
    y[2] = x[2]

    fmt.Println(y...)
}

Or something a little more general:

    x := make([]int, 3)
    y := make([]interface{}, len(x))
    for i, v := range x {
        y[i] = v
    }

    fmt.Println(y...)

Regarding your specific issue, see the following:

    x := make([]*int, 3)
    for i := range x {
        x[i] = new(int)
    }

    y := make([]interface{}, 3)

    for i, v := range x {
        y[i] = v
    }

    if _, err := fmt.Scanln(y...); err != nil {
        fmt.Println("Scanln err: ", err)
    }

    for _, v := range y {
        val := v.(*int)
        fmt.Println(*val)
    }
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Thanks, I don't get the error anymore but when I print, I get zeros, I guess because fmt.Scanln() expects references. I tried fmt.Scanln(&y...), to no avail. Any idea? –  Frolik Mar 14 '13 at 17:18
    
I updated with an example –  dskinner Mar 14 '13 at 18:02
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I think the the correct version should be

X := make([]int, 3)
fmt.Scanln(&X[0], &X[1], &X[2])
fmt.Printf("%v\n", X)
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Actually I have a bunch of lines to process and they're not all the same length, some have hundreds of numbers. –  Frolik Mar 14 '13 at 16:33
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