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In many C/C++ macros I'm seeing the code of the macro wrapped in what seems like a meaningless do while loop. Here are examples.

#define FOO(X) do { f(X); g(X); } while (0)
#define FOO(X) if (1) { f(X); g(X); } else

I can't see what the do while is doing. Why not just write this without it?

#define FOO(X) f(X); g(X)
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11 Answers 11

up vote 415 down vote accepted

The do ... while and if ... else are there to make it so that a semicolon after your macro always means the same thing. Let's say you had something like your second macro.

#define BAR(X) f(x); g(x)

Now if you were to use BAR(X); in an if ... else statement, where the bodies of the if statement were not wrapped in curly brackets, you'd get a bad surprise.

if (corge)
  BAR(corge);
else
  gralt();

The above code would expand into

if (corge)
  f(corge); g(corge);
else
  gralt();

which is syntactically incorrect, as the else is no longer associated with the if. It doesn't help to wrap things in curly braces within the macro, because a semicolon after the braces is syntactically incorrect.

if (corge)
  {f(corge); g(corge);};
else
  gralt();

There are two ways of fixing the problem. The first is to use a comma to sequence statements within the macro without robbing it of its ability to act like an expression.

#define BAR(X) f(X), g(X)

The above version of bar BAR expands the above code into what follows, which is syntactically correct.

if (corge)
  f(corge), g(corge);
else
  gralt();

This doesn't work if instead of f(X) you have a more complicated body of code that needs to go in its own block, say for example to declare local variables. In the most general case the solution is to use something like do ... while to cause the macro to be a single statement that takes a semicolon without confusion.

#define BAR(X) do { \
  int i = f(X); \
  if (i > 4) g(i); \
} while (0)

You don't have to use do ... while, you could cook up something with if ... else as well, although when if ... else expands inside of an if ... else it leads to a "dangling else", which could make an existing dangling else problem even harder to find, as in the following code.

if (corge)
  if (1) { f(corge); g(corge); } else;
else
  gralt();

The point is to use up the semicolon in contexts where a dangling semicolon is erroneous. Of course, it could (and probably should) be argued at this point that it would be better to declare BAR as an actual function, not a macro.

In summary, the do ... while is there to work around the shortcomings of the C preprocessor. When those C style guides tell you to lay off the C preprocessor, this is the kind of thing they're worried about.

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57  
It's as if he knew the question was going to be asked... ;) –  Michael Burr Sep 30 '08 at 17:57
25  
I know, I know! It's like I can read my own mind sometimes! –  jfm3 Sep 30 '08 at 18:05
14  
Why is it that when I did this exact same thing, I got downvoted? –  Imagist Oct 10 '09 at 8:33
12  
@Imagist: You shouldn't have been. This is encouraged. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 16 '12 at 21:59
5  
@DawidFerenczy: although both you and me-from-four-and-a-half-years-ago make a good point, we have to live in the real world. Unless we can guarantee that all the if statements, etc, in our code use braces, then wrapping macros like this is a simple way of avoiding problems. –  Steve Melnikoff Nov 20 '13 at 17:16

Macros are copy/pasted pieces of text the pre-processor will put in the genuine code; the macro's author hoping the replacement will produce valid code.

So there are three good "tips" to succeed in that

Help the macro behaves like genuine code

Normal code is usually ended by a semi-colon. Should the user view code not needing one...

doSomething(1) ;
DO_SOMETHING_ELSE(2)  // <== Hey? What's this?
doSomethingElseAgain(3) ;

It means the user expects the compiler to produce an error if the semi-colon is absent.

But the real real good reason is that at some time, the macro's author will perhaps need to replace the macro with a genuine function (perhaps inlined). So the macro should really behave like one.

So we should have a macro needing semi-colon.

Produce a valid code

As shown in jfm3's answer, sometimes, the macro contains more than one instruction. And if the macro is used inside a if statement, this will be problematic:

if(bIsOk)
   MY_MACRO(42) ;

This macro could be expanded as:

#define MY_MACRO(x) f(x) ; g(x)

if(bIsOk)
   f(42) ; g(42) ; // was MY_MACRO(42) ;

The g function will be executed no matter the value of the bIsOk bool value.

This means that you must have to add a scope to the macro:

#define MY_MACRO(x) { f(x) ; g(x) ; }

if(bIsOk)
   { f(42) ; g(42) ; } ; // was MY_MACRO(42) ;

Produce a valid code 2

What if the macro is something like:

#define MY_MACRO(x) int i = x + 1 ; f(i) ;

We could have another problem in the following code:

void doSomething()
{
    int i = 25 ;
    MY_MACRO(32) ;
}

Because it would expand as:

void doSomething()
{
    int i = 25 ;
    int i = 32 + 1 ; f(i) ; ; // was MY_MACRO(32) ;
}

This code won't compile, of course. So, again, the solution is using a scope:

#define MY_MACRO(x) { int i = x + 1 ; f(i) ; }

void doSomething()
{
    int i = 25 ;
    { int i = x + 1 ; f(i) ; } ; // was MY_MACRO(32) ;
}

The code behaves correctly again.

Combining semi-colon + scope effects?

There is one C/C++ idiom that produces this effect: The do ... while loop:

do
{
    // code
}
while(false) ;

The do while both can create a scope, thus encapsulating the macro's code and needs a semi-colon in the end, thus expanding into code needing one.

The bonus?

The C++ compiler will optimize away the do/while loop, as the fact its post-condition is false is known at compile time. This means that a macro like:

#define MY_MACRO(x)                                  \
do
{
    const int i = x + 1 ;
    f(i) ; g(i) ;
}
while(false)

void doSomething(bool bIsOk)
{
   int i = 25 ;

   if(bIsOk)
      MY_MACRO(42) ;

   // Etc.
}

while expand correctly as:

void doSomething(bool bIsOk)
{
   int i = 25 ;

   if(bIsOk)
      do
      {
         const int i = 42 + 1 ; // was MY_MACRO(42) ;
         f(i) ; g(i) ;
      }
      while(false) ;

   // Etc.
}

and then compiled and optimized away as:

void doSomething(bool bIsOk)
{
   int i = 25 ;

   if(bIsOk)
   {
      f(43) ; g(43) ;
   }

   // Etc.
}
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2  
Note that changing macros to inline function alters some standard predefined macros, e.g. the following code shows a change in FUNCTION and LINE: #include <stdio.h> #define Fmacro() printf("%s %d\n", FUNCTION, LINE) inline void Finline() { printf("%s %d\n", FUNCTION, LINE); } int main() { Fmacro(); Finline(); return 0; } (bold terms should be enclosed by double underscores — bad formatter!) –  Gnubie Aug 23 '12 at 10:52
1  
There are a number of minor but not completely inconsequential issues with this answer. For instance: void doSomething() { int i = 25 ; { int i = x + 1 ; f(i) ; } ; // was MY_MACRO(32) ; } is not the correct expansion; the x in the expansion should be 32. A more complex issue is what is the expansion of MY_MACRO(i+7). And another is the expansion of MY_MACRO(0x07 << 6). There's a lot that's good, but there are some undotted i's and uncrossed t's. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 26 '13 at 4:17

@jfm3 - You have a nice answer to the question. You might also want to add that the macro idiom also prevents the possibly more dangerous (because there's no error) unintended behavior with simple 'if' statements:

#define FOO(x)  f(x); g(x)

if (test) FOO( baz);

expands to:

if (test) f(baz); g(baz);

which is syntactically correct so there's no compiler error, but has the probably unintended consequence that g() will always be called.

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9  
"probably unintended"? I would have said "certainly unintended", or else the programmer needs to be taken out and shot (as opposed to roundly chastised with a whip). –  Lawrence Dol Apr 22 '10 at 2:45
3  
Or they might be given a raise, if they're working for a three-letter agency and surreptitiously inserting that code into a widely-used open source program... :-) –  R.. Apr 26 '12 at 3:09
    
And this comment just reminds me of the goto fail line in the recent SSL cert verification bug found in Apple OSes –  Gerard Sexton Mar 11 at 14:31

While it is expected that compilers optimize away the do { ... } while(false); loops, there is another solution which would not require that construct. The solution is to use the comma operator:

#define FOO(X) (f(X),g(X))

or even more exotically:

#define FOO(X) g((f(X),(X)))

While this will work well with separate instructions, it will not work with cases where variables are constructed and used as part of the #define :

#define FOO(X) (int s=5,f((X)+s),g((X)+s))

With this one would be forced to use the do/while construct.

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1  
g((f(X),(X))) is a very cute trick! –  jfm3 Jun 1 '11 at 4:20
    
thanks, since the comma operator does not guarantee execution order, this nesting is a way to enforce that. –  Marius Jun 5 '11 at 13:39
6  
@Marius: False; the comma operator is a sequence point and thereby does guarantee execution order. I suspect you confused it with the comma in function argument lists. –  R.. Apr 12 '12 at 5:02
1  
The second exotic suggestion made my day. –  Spidey Jun 20 '13 at 19:08

The above answers explain the meaning of these constructs, but there is a significant difference between the two that was not mentioned. In fact, there is a reason to prefer the do ... while to the if ... else construct.

The problem of the if ... else construct is that it does not force you to put the semicolon. Like in this code:

FOO(1)
printf("abc");

Although we left out the semicolon (by mistake), the code will expand to

if (1) { f(X); g(X); } else
printf("abc");

and will silently compile (although some compilers may issue a warning for unreachable code). But the printf statement will never be executed.

do ... while construct does not have such problem, since the only valid token after the while(0) is a semicolon.

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1  
@RichardHansen: Still not as good, because from the look at the macro invocation you don't know whether it expands to a statement or to an expression. If someone assumes the later, she may write FOO(1),x++; which will again give us a false positive. Just use do ... while and that's it. –  ybungalobill Aug 3 '12 at 17:35
1  
Documenting the macro to avoid the misunderstanding should suffice. I do agree that do ... while (0) is preferable, but it has one downside: A break or continue will control the do ... while (0) loop, not the loop containing the macro invocation. So the if trick still has value. –  Richard Hansen Aug 3 '12 at 21:10
1  
I don't see where you could put a break or a continue that would be seen as inside your macros do {...} while(0) pseudo-loop. Even in the macro parameter it would make a syntax error. –  tristopia Dec 21 '12 at 16:02
2  
Another reason to use do { ... } while(0) instead of if whatever construct, is the idiomatic nature of it. The do {...} while(0) construct is widespread, well known and used a lot by many programmers. Its rationale and documentation is readily known. Not so for the if construct. It takes therefore less effort to grok when doing code review. –  tristopia Dec 21 '12 at 16:05
1  
@tristopia: I've seen people write macros that take blocks of code as arguments (which I don't necessarily recommend). For example: #define CHECK(call, onerr) if (0 != (call)) { onerr } else (void)0. It could be used like CHECK(system("foo"), break;);, where the break; is intended to refer to the loop enclosing the CHECK() invocation. –  Richard Hansen Jul 18 '13 at 17:18

Noting more to write after the above answers, but I would suggest investigating the macro replacements by looking at the preprocessed output from your compiler. For gcc use

gcc -E file.c

Please note this would also dump all the #includes from your source, so removing the #includes (or using -nostdinc flag) would help keep the output short and the macro replacements could be seen easily.

Although not very specific about this topic, I would like to add to @John Nilsson's answer. Say you have the following macro

#define square(x) (x*x)

And you do square (2+2) in the code then it would expand to (2+2*2+2) which is not correct. So an extra parenthesis around the 'x' should be given. Like below

#define square(x) ((x)*(x))

This would get the correct replacement ((2+2)*(2+2))

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This is invaluable when playing with tricky macros! –  luser droog Aug 3 '11 at 5:27

I don't think it was mentioned so consider this

while(i<100)
  FOO(i++);

would be translated into

while(i<100)
  do { f(i++); g(i++); } while (0)

notice how i++ is evaluated twice by the macro. This can lead to some interesting errors.

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8  
This has nothing to do with the do ... while(0) construct. –  Trent Nov 18 '08 at 19:54
2  
True. But relevent to the topic of macros vs. functions and how to write a macro that behaves as a function... –  John Nilsson Nov 26 '08 at 19:21

For some reasons I can't comment on the first answer...

Some of you showed macros with local variables, but nobody mentioned that you can't just use any name in a macro! It will bite the user some day! Why? Because the input arguments are substituted into your macro template. And in your macro examples you've use the probably most commonly used variabled name i.

For example when the following macro

#define FOO(X) do { int i; for (i = 0; i < (X); ++i) do_something(i); } while (0)

is used in the following function

void some_func(void) {
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
        FOO(i);
}

the macro will not use the intended variable i, that is declared at the beginning of some_func, but the local variable, that is declared in the do ... while loop of the macro.

Thus, never use common variable names in a macro!

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The usual pattern is to add underscores in variable names in macros - for instance int __i;. –  Blaisorblade Dec 22 '11 at 1:03
4  
@Blaisorblade: Actually that's incorrect and illegal C; leading underscores are reserved for use by the implementation. The reason you've seen this "usual pattern" is from reading system headers ("the implementation") which must restrict themselves to this reserved namespace. For applications/libraries, you should choose your own obscure, unlikely-to-collide names without underscores, e.g. mylib_internal___i or similar. –  R.. Apr 12 '12 at 5:05
2  
@R.. You're right - I've actually read this in an ''application'', the Linux kernel, but it's an exception anyway since it uses no standard library (technically, a ''freestanding'' C implementation instead of a ''hosted'' one). –  Blaisorblade Apr 12 '12 at 16:23
    
@R.. this is not quite correct: leading underscores followed by a capital or second underscore are reserved for the implementation in all contexts. Leading underscores followed by something else are not reserved in local scope. –  Leushenko May 3 at 3:15
    
@Leushenko: Yes, but the distinction is sufficiently subtle that I find it best to tell people just not to use such names at all. The people who understand the subtlety presumably already know that I'm glossing over the details. :-) –  R.. May 3 at 3:16

I just compiled

#define M {int a = 45; int b = 23;}

int main(){
  M;
}

with gcc version 4.6.3. CPP expands the macro as expected, but the compiler doesn't seem to care about the trailing semicolon.

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Better than do {} while (0) and if (1) {} else, one can simply use ({}):

#define FOO(X) ({f(X); g(X);})

And this syntax is compatible with return values (do {} while (0) isn't), as in:

return FOO("X");
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This is a very nice feature when actually available, but it's not a part of standard C - it's a GNU extension. –  Leushenko May 3 at 3:16

I have found this trick very helpful is in situations, where we have to sequentially process a particular variable. And at each level of processing, if some error or invalid condition occurs, we have to avoid the sequential processing and do an exit. e.g.

#define CALL_AND_RETURN(x)  if ( x() == false) break;
do {
     CALL_AND_RETURN(process_first);
     CALL_AND_RETURN(process_second);
     CALL_AND_RETURN(process_third);
     //(simply add other calls here)
} while (0);
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