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Today I was going through the quick sort algorithm from Algorithms in C by R.Sedgewick.

I understood a good chunk of how the algorithm works. The coding part just confused me a bit and I got a segmentation fault at the end. Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>
void quicksort(int[], int, int); // prototype

void quicksort(int a[], int l, int r) // What is the value of l. Why hasn't the author 
                                      // mentioned it. Is it the size of the array? 
{
    int i, j, v, t;
    if(r > l)
    {
        v = a[r];
        i = l - 1; // What is l here? Is it the size if yes look at first while statement
        j = r;

        for(;;)
        {

            /*The algorithm says: scan from right until an element < a[r] is found. Where 
              r is the last position in the array. But while checking in the second while
              loop elements > a[r] is searched */

            while (a[++i] < v); // How can you increment again after reaching end of arrray
                                // size if l is the size of the array
            while (a[--j] > v);
            if(i >= j) break;
            t = a[i]; a[i] = a[j]; a[j] = t;
        }
    }

    t = a[i]; a[i] = a[r]; a[r] = t;

    quicksort(a, l, i - 1);
    quicksort(a, i + 1, r);

    return;
}

int main()
{
    int i, a[10]; // assuming size is 10

    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        scanf("%d", &a[i]);
    }

    int l = 10; // I am passing size of the array
    int r = 9; // position of last element

    quicksort(a, l, r);
    return 0;
}

The error is like this. Suppose if I enter 10 elements and then press enter, this is what happens:

1 4 8 2 3 6 4 7 10 9
segmentation fault.

process returned 139(0x8b)

This is what debugger returned:

Breakpoint 1, quicksort (a=0xbffff808, l=0, r=0) at quick.c:11
11      if(r > 1)
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x080484fb in quicksort (a=0xbffff808, l=0, r=0) at quick.c:28
28      t = a[i]; a[i] = a[r]; a[r] = t;
(gdb) c
Continuing.

Program terminated with signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
The program no longer exists.
(gdb) c
The program is not being run.

The correct way to do the above program is this. There is nothing with the left and right pointer. The left pointer should point to 0th location and right pointer to n - 1 location, if array occupies n memory locations. I had done a silly mistake by not including the recursive function of quicksort inside the if condition. Hence all that headache. The correct program is:

/* Working quicksort
 * Robert sedgewick best
 */

#include <stdio.h>

void quicksort(int[], int, int); // prototype

void quicksort(int a[], int l, int r) 
{
    int i, j, v, t;
    if(r > l)
    {
        v = a[r];
        i = l - 1;
        j = r;

        for(;;)
       {
            while (a[++i] < v); 
            while (a[--j] > v);

            if(i >= j) break;
            t = a[i]; a[i] = a[j]; a[j] = t;

        } // End for here


    t = a[i]; a[i] = a[r]; a[r] = t;

    quicksort(a, l, i - 1);
    quicksort(a, i + 1, r);

    } /* End if here. That is include the recursive
         functions inside the if condition. Then it works 
         just fine. */

    return;
}

int main()
{
    int i, a[5]; // assuming size is 10

    for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        scanf("%d", &a[i]);
    }

    int l = 0; // I am passing size of the array
    int r = 4; // position of last element

    quicksort(a, l, r);

       int s;

    for(s = 0; s < 5; s++)
    {
        printf("%d ", a[s]);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
l and r stand for "left" and "right", respectively. –  abeln Mar 14 '13 at 15:38
    
Please paste the fault message. You really shouldn't make people on SO dig thru your code when the error is right there, it should help determine where in code it happened. I would add printouts if necessary too. –  75inchpianist Mar 14 '13 at 15:39
    
Does left mean 0 and r mean 9 if the number of elements in the array is 10? –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 15:39
    
@user2147954: yes, but there are other problems. For example, if r == 1, then t = a[i]... will break, because i's value is undefined. –  abeln Mar 14 '13 at 15:42
2  
I (and probably most other people in the C/C++ forums of SO) own Sedgewicks books, and this algorithm is NOT verbatim to his. Among several places where it differs, the problem abein pointed out above. You may want to check that again. –  WhozCraig Mar 14 '13 at 15:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Please run in a debugger such as gdb. This will show you the exact line your segfault is happening on. If you google "gdb cheatsheet" it will be easy enough to get started. Remember to compile with -g flag."

My session:

dan@dev1:~ $ gcc -g quick.c
dan@dev1:~ $ gdb a.out
...
(gdb) r
Starting program: /home/dan/a.out 
1 4 8 2 3 6 4 7 10 9

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000000000400572 in quicksort (a=0x7fffffffe530, l=10, r=9) at quick.c:21
21              while (a[++i] < v); // How can you increment again after reaching end of arrray
share|improve this answer
    
Breakpoint 1, quicksort (a=0xbffff808, l=0, r=9) at quick.c:11 11 if(r > 1) (gdb) –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 15:52
    
This is it right? –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 15:52
    
@user2147954 update to show what I did. A segfault you generally won't need to step through to find. –  djechlin Mar 14 '13 at 15:56
    
Yeah I did. I placed it in the edits before you asked. –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 15:57
    
What should i do? I am not able to find out the error? –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 16:05

l and r stand for "left" and "right", respectively.

The segmentation fault is happening because you're passing l = 10, so while (a[++i] < v); breaks.

[edit]

while (a[++i] < v);                                
while (a[--j] > v);

These two loops are also problematic: you need to test that i and j are not out of bounds.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok suppose if I pass 0 to l, that is: l = 0 or l = 1 I still get an segmentation fault error –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 15:43
    
So are you saying that sedgewick is wrong? –  user2147954 Mar 14 '13 at 15:53
3  
Sedgewick is not wrong, but this implementation is. –  abeln Mar 14 '13 at 15:54
int a[10];
int l = 10;
int r =  9; 

quicksort(a, l, r);

called quicksort(a, l, r)
//l=10,r=9
if(r > 1) // 9 > 1 is true
{
    i = l - 1;//i = 10 - 1 = 9
    for(;;)
    {
        while (a[++i] < v);//a[++i] is a[9+1] = a[10] is out of range!!
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah you are right. That is actually (r > l) that is the english alphabet l not the number 1. Thanks for pointing out though. I have posted the corrected answer also –  user2147954 Mar 15 '13 at 1:56

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