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Unless I am missing something or missunderstand the mechanism (very likely) Shouldn't the "1" duplicate not exist in this vector ?

chunks.erase( std::unique ( chunks.begin(), chunks.end(), 
                           []( std::string &s1, std::string &s2 ){ 
                              return ( s1.compare(s2) == 0 ? true : false );}), 
                           chunks.end() );

Before Executing the above:

1       l:1
1+      l:2
1+1     l:3
1+1=    l:4
+       l:1
+1      l:2
+1=     l:3
1       l:1
1=      l:2
=       l:1

After executing the above code:

1       l:1
1+      l:2
1+1     l:3
1+1=    l:4
+       l:1
+1      l:2
+1=     l:3
1       l:1
1=      l:2
=       l:1

I have tried without a predicate (assuming std::strings that are identical would be removed). For some reason the "ones" are identified as identical? I have looked at their length (assuming a whitespace was stuck as a prefix or postfix) but they have the same length.

Am I missing something ?

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You really shouldn't need to use this predicate as it is used by default. Can you please add more code as what are the exact strings and how you print the output? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 14 '13 at 15:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are (probably) misunderstanding something.

std::unique only removes contiguous duplicates, so if you wish to remove all duplicates a precondition to applying std::unique is to sort your range using the same predicate.

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std::unique assumes that non-unique elements are adjacent, as they would be if (for one example) chunks were sorted. This allows std::unique to have O(n) complexity.

If you want to maintain a specific order in your vector and remove duplicates, that's a problem with O(n2) complexity. You can use the logic provided here to do that.

// Create a new vector without the duplicates
std::vector<string> unique_chunks;
for (std::vector<string>::iterator x = chunks.begin(); x != chunks.end();) {
  if ( unique_chunks.find(*x) != unique_chunks.end() ) {
    unique_chunks.push_back( *x );
  }
}

// Make chunks hold this new vector (allowing the old vector to be destroyed)
std::swap( chunks, unique_chunks );

And no, you didn't need that predicate.

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It could be done O(n log n) too, if I understand correct(sort + unique + sort) –  RiaD Mar 14 '13 at 16:19
    
@RiaD: Unless your two sorts have different ordering criteria, (sort + unique + sort) is exactly equivalent to (sort + unique). –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 14 '13 at 16:22
    
@RiaD Perhaps? It would be more like (sort + unique + un-sort) though. I can't think of a good un-sort approach though. –  Drew Dormann Mar 14 '13 at 16:23
    
@BenjaminLindley, surely they are different –  RiaD Mar 14 '13 at 16:25
    
@RiaD: What's different? The ordering criteria? Then what is the ordering criteria for the second sort? –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 14 '13 at 16:26

The std::unique algorithm assumes that the input range is in order and removes duplicates by comparing two consecutive values. To be able to use the algorithm you will need to sort the input first.

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As mentioned in other answer, unique deletes contiguous blocks of duplicate, if you need remove duplicates and preserve order of rest elements(order of first occurrence, here) in O(N log N) time you may do the following:

template<typename T>
bool bySecond(const pair<T, int>& a, const pair<T, int>& b) {
    return a.second < b.second;
}

template<typename T>
bool firstEqual(const pair<T, int>& a, const pair<T, int>& b) {
    return a.first == b.first;
}

template<typename it>
it yourUnique(it begin, it end){
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits<it>::value_type value_t;
    vector<pair<value_t, int>> v;
    for(it c = begin; c != end; ++c){
        v.push_back(make_pair(*c, v.size())); // second is start index;
    }
    sort(v.begin(), v.end()); // sort by value then by index
    v.erase(unique(v.begin(), v.end(), firstEqual<value_t>), v.end());
    sort(v.begin(), v.end(), bySecond<value_t>); // restore order.
    it c = begin;

    for(const auto& x: v){
       *(c++) = x.first;
    }
    return it;
}

Possibility to have own predicate isn't implemented. It's possible but one disadvantage is that you will have to provide less-than function, not equality one, that's maybe impossible in some cases.

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+1 Okay, clever. But you need a predicate for unique which ignores second. Otherwise, it won't remove anything, because every pair is unique by its second value. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 14 '13 at 16:38
    
Nice. It's verbose, but for big vectors you win the big O test. Edit: I said "clever", but when multiple devs use that word, it starts to get a certain smell :) –  Drew Dormann Mar 14 '13 at 16:38
    
@BenjaminLindley, sure. I'll add it now –  RiaD Mar 14 '13 at 16:45
    
@BenjaminLindley, fixed –  RiaD Mar 14 '13 at 16:49
    
It has a few problems, may I suggest: pastebin.com/dFAB96Zb –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 14 '13 at 17:01

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