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I am developing a c# program which has an "IEnumerable users" that stores the ids of 4 million users. I need to loop through the Ienummerable and extract a batch 1000 ids each time to perform some operations in another method.

How do I extract 1000 ids at a time from start of the Ienumerable ...do some thing else then fetch the next batch of 1000 and so on ?

Is this possible?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Sounds like you need to use Skip and Take methods of your object. Example:

users.Skip(1000).Take(1000)

this would skip the first 1000 and take the next 1000. You'd just need to increase the amount skipped with each call

You could use an integer variable with the parameter for Skip and you can adjust how much is skipped. You can then call it in a method.

public IEnumerable<user> GetBatch(int pageNumber)
{
    return users.Skip(pageNumber * 1000).Take(1000);
}
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Thanks bill. I didn't quite get what the pagenumber * in (pageNumber * 1000) do I understoood users.Skip(1000).Take(1000) perfectly. An d I would just need to increment skip 1000...2000...3000 and so on –  user1526912 Mar 14 '13 at 17:32
    
The pageNumber parameter would be incremented each time you need to retrieve a new batch of users. So for example, when you want to get the 3001 to 4000 batch, you'd call the method: var usersBatch = GetBatch(3); –  Bill Pearmain Mar 15 '13 at 10:15

You can use morelinq Batch method (available from NuGet):

foreach(IEnumerable<User> batch in users.Batch(1000))
   // use batch

If simple usage of library is not an option, you can reuse implementation:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source, int size)
{
    T[] bucket = null;
    var count = 0;

    foreach (var item in source)
    {
       if (bucket == null)
           bucket = new T[size];

       bucket[count++] = item;

       if (count != size)                
          continue;

       yield return bucket.Select(x => x);

       bucket = null;
       count = 0;
    }

    // Return the last bucket with all remaining elements
    if (bucket != null && count > 0)            
        yield return bucket.Take(count);            
}

BTW for performance you can simply return bucket without calling Select(x => x). Select is optimized for arrays, but selector delegate still would be invoked on each item. So, in your case it's better to use

yield return bucket;
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1  
I was about to answer this. Don't reinvent the wheel, use MoreLinq's Batch method ;-) –  Meta-Knight Mar 14 '13 at 16:11
    
@Meta-Knight yep, I use theirs MaxBy, DistinctBy, Batch and other methods. It's better to invent new car, than to reinvent wheels :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 14 '13 at 16:13
1  
It's worth noting that the Select is there specifically to obscure the underlying array from the caller (not that they can do much with it at that point). Most people won't have a need for it, but for a library method it helps them avoid breaking changes if they change the implementation in the future. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 20:43
    
@Servy thanks, thats a good note –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 14 '13 at 20:55
    
such sexy science –  superlogical Jun 18 at 3:10

The easiest way to do this is probably just to use the GroupBy method in linq

var batches = myEnumerable
    .Select((x, i) => new { x, i })
    .GroupBy(p => (p.i / 1000), (p, i) => p.x);

But for a more sophisticated solution, see this blog post on how to create your won extension method to do this. Duplicated here for posterity:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, int batchSize)
{
    List<T> nextbatch = new List<T>(batchSize);
    foreach (T item in collection)
    {
        nextbatch.Add(item);
        if (nextbatch.Count == batchSize)
        {
            yield return nextbatch;
            nextbatch = new List<T>(); 
            // or nextbatch.Clear(); but see Sevy's comment below
        }
    }
    if (nextbatch.Count > 0)
        yield return nextbatch;
}
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1  
Wouldn't that create 4 millions of anonymous objects (not mine downvote)? Also internally it will create lookup for all those objects. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 14 '13 at 16:18
1  
@lazyberezovsky yes, I suppose it would (I did say it was the easiest way, not necessarily the best). I added an alternative solution as well. –  p.s.w.g Mar 14 '13 at 16:23
    
Yep, good edit. I recommend you also take a look on morelinq implementation with array as bucket. I think it will little faster –  Sergey Berezovskiy Mar 14 '13 at 16:26
    
Since the List<T> never is never resized in this example, isn't it the same thing? –  p.s.w.g Mar 14 '13 at 16:28
1  
@lazyberezovsky good point. I'll upvote for morelinq :) –  p.s.w.g Mar 14 '13 at 16:38

You can achieve that using Take and Skip Enumerable extension method. For more information on usage checkout linq 101

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Yes, but it might not be very efficient... –  Henk Holterman Mar 14 '13 at 16:10
    
I understand that take can be used but when I take 1000 records how do I take another 1000 from last point –  user1526912 Mar 14 '13 at 16:11
1  
@user1526912 - Skip(i*1000).Take(1000) with i = 0,1,2,... –  Henk Holterman Mar 14 '13 at 16:11
1  
@user1526912 If you are using .Net framework 4.0 or higher you can use PLINQ to take advantage of multicore processer to process it little faster –  Krishnaswamy Subramanian Mar 14 '13 at 16:18
    
This is great for LINQ-to-somequeryprovider in which Skip can be implemented efficiently. For LINQ-To-Objects this will both iterate the source sequence once for each batch, but spend a lot of time in Skip as it is not efficient for arbitrary sequences. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 20:41

try using this:

  public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TSource>> Batch<TSource>(
        this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
        int batchSize)
    {
        var batch = new List<TSource>();
        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            batch.Add(item);
            if (batch.Count == batchSize)
            {
                 yield return batch;
                 batch = new List<TSource>();
            }
        }

        if (batch.Any()) yield return batch;
    }

and to use above function:

foreach (var list in Users.Batch(1000))
{

}
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1  
You can get a minor efficiency bump by providing the batch size to the list constructor. –  Servy Mar 14 '13 at 20:42

You can use Take operator linq

Link : http://msdn.microsoft.com/fr-fr/library/vstudio/bb503062.aspx

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Something like this would work:

List<MyClass> batch = new List<MyClass>();
foreach (MyClass item in items)
{
    batch.Add(item);

    if (batch.Count == 1000)
    {
        // Perform operation on batch
        batch.Clear();
    }
}

// Process last batch
if (batch.Any())
{
    // Perform operation on batch
}

And you could generalize this into a generic method, like this:

static void PerformBatchedOperation<T>(IEnumerable<T> items, 
                                       Action<IEnumerable<T>> operation, 
                                       int batchSize)
{
    List<T> batch = new List<T>();
    foreach (T item in items)
    {
        batch.Add(item);

        if (batch.Count == batchSize)
        {
            operation(batch);
            batch.Clear();
        }
    }

    // Process last batch
    if (batch.Any())
    {
        operation(batch);
    }
}
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