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I've got a generic class:

public class BaseFieldValue<T>
{
    public BaseFieldValue()
    {
        //...
    }

    public BaseFieldValue(string value)
    {
        //...
    }

    public BaseFieldValue(T value)
    {
        //...
    }
}

Fine. Except...

var myValue = new BaseFieldValue<string>("hello");

Oops. The undesired constructor is called. There's a number of ways to address the problem. What's the best solution?

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May be you can try this: var myValue = new BaseFieldValue<Object>("hello" as Object); –  Amit Oct 9 '09 at 8:18
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5 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would probably make one of the overloads into a factory method:

public static BaseFieldValue<T> Parse(string value){}
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What if BaseFieldValue is a Database connection class and the string is the connection string? –  Yuriy Faktorovich Oct 9 '09 at 2:02
1  
@Yuriy this would still be viable in that case. –  Rex M Oct 9 '09 at 2:07
    
@Rex, yes, but it would work unlike other Database connection classes, just trying to preserve patterns. –  Yuriy Faktorovich Oct 9 '09 at 2:09
    
I tested an implementation of this with our development team and they found it very intuitive. Cheers! –  Rex M Oct 19 '09 at 15:28
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You could do the following:

public class BaseFieldValue<T>
{
    public struct Special
    {
        internal string m_value;
        public Special(string value)
        {
            m_value = value;
        }
    }

    public BaseFieldValue()
    {
        //...
    }

    public BaseFieldValue(Special value)
    {
        //...
    }

    public BaseFieldValue(T value)
    {
        //...
    }
}

... or, you could add an extra ignored boolean parameter to your special constructor, just to disambiguate it.

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1  
+1 for your last option –  recursive Oct 9 '09 at 4:35
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Couldn't make Type Contraints do what I wanted, so my workaround is removing the ambiguous constructor while retaining the special case for string:

public class BaseFieldValue<T>
{
    public BaseFieldValue()
    {
        //...
    } 

    public BaseFieldValue(T value) 
    {
        //however many things you need to test for here
        if (typeof(T) == typeof(string))
        {
            SpecialBaseFieldValue(value.ToString());
        }
        else
        {
            //everything else
        }
        //...
    }

    private void SpecialBaseFieldValue(string value)
    {
        //...
    }

}
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But typeof(T) will never equal typeof(string) when you're using an instance of BaseFieldValue<int>, BaseFieldValue<DateTime>, BaseFieldValue<CustomType> etc. –  LukeH Oct 9 '09 at 11:47
    
My unit test for string and int worked fine. –  rick schott Oct 9 '09 at 12:39
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A nasty hack, but probably no worse than any of the alternatives:

public class BaseFieldValue<T>
{
    public BaseFieldValue()
    {
        // ...
    }

    public BaseFieldValue(StringWrapper value)
    {
        // ...
    }

    public BaseFieldValue(T value)
    {
        // ...
    }

    public class StringWrapper
    {
        private string _value;

        public static implicit operator string(StringWrapper sw)
        {
            return sw._value;
        }

        public static implicit operator StringWrapper(string s)
        {
            return new StringWrapper { _value = s };
        }
    }
}

And now it can be used as you need:

// call the generic constructor
var myValue = new BaseFieldValue<string>("hello");

// call the string constructor
var myValue = new BaseFieldValue<int>("hello");
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May be you can try thi:

var myValue = new BaseFieldValue<Object>("hello" as Object);
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@Amy that would seem to defeat the purpose of having a generic class. –  Rex M Oct 9 '09 at 14:22
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