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I'm trying to test my controller's action chain in isolation. Specifically, I want to ensure my desired behavior is applied to all my controller's actions. For example, test that all my actions require authentication:

context "when not authenticated" do

  # single case
  describe "GET index" do
    it "responds with 401" do
      get :index
      response.code.should be(401)
    end
  end

  # all of them...
  described_class.action_methods.each do |action|
    ['get', 'put', 'post', 'delete', 'patch'].each do |verb|
      describe "#{verb.upcase} #{action}" do
        it "responds with 401" do
          send verb, action
          response.code.should == "401"
        end
      end
    end   
  end

end

I expected this to work but it doesn't. I get some ActionController::RoutingErrors. This is because some of my routes require params and in some cases I'm not supplying them (like when I call post :create). I get that. But what I don't understand is: why should it matter!?

For these tests routing is a separate concern. I care about my action chains, not my requests (that's what I have routing specs and request specs for). I shouldn't need to concern myself with my route constraints at this level.

So my question: Is there a way to test just the action chain without simulating a request?

EDIT: some research

It looks like routes are being exercised in TestCase#process. Is this necessary?

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2 Answers 2

I'd argue that routing is not a separate concern for controller specs. One reason why is that values are added to the params hash based on what values are passed into the url, and the code in your controller may depend on those values.

Anyway, I'm assuming that you have some kind of authorization method defined in your ApplicationController. Testing each controller individually seems a little redundant. Here's how I'd do it:

require "spec_helper"

describe ApplicationController do
  describe "require_current_user" do
    ACTIONS_AND_VERBS = [
      [:index,   :get],
      [:show,    :get],
      [:new,     :get],
      [:create,  :post],
      [:edit,    :get],
      [:update,  :put],
      [:destroy, :delete],
    ]

    controller do      
      ACTIONS_AND_VERBS.each do |action, _|
        define_method(action) do
        end
      end
    end

    ACTIONS_AND_VERBS.each do |action, verb|
      describe "#{verb.to_s.upcase} '#{action}'" do
        it "should be successful" do
          send(verb, action, id: -1)
          response.code.should eq("401")
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

And in my ApplicationController I'd have something like...

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
  protect_from_forgery

  before_filter :require_current_user

  def require_current_user
    head :unauthorized
  end
end

EDIT: If I understand correctly, what we're really testing is that your require_current_user, or whatever equivalent authorization process you want to occur, is working as expected. In that case, we can test just one action, and trust that before_filter works properly.

require "spec_helper"

describe ApplicationController do
  describe "require_current_user" do
    controller do
      def index
      end
    end

    it 'should head unauthorized for unauthorized users' do
      get :index
      response.code.should eq("401")
    end
  end
end
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Re: params. Yes, but the values in the params hash don't need to come from a route. They could be from a form, for instance. If my controller depends on params, then I should set just set those params directly, not indirectly through some routing magic. –  thedeeno Mar 14 '13 at 17:25
    
Re: redundancy. I smell a problem with your approach. For one, the fact that your controllers share a common base is an implementation detail. Even though the target outcome of all our controllers is the same, how we get there might be different for each of them. Second, there's nothing stopping a subclass from overriding its super class, so testing the super class isn't enough. Finally, it's possible for the subclasses to define actions - which means the super class test needs to know about all of these. Leaky. I think the actual controller instance is our atomic unit here. –  thedeeno Mar 14 '13 at 17:28
    
Your approach is DRY though. I'm just (too?) paranoid when it comes to these authentication policies. –  thedeeno Mar 14 '13 at 17:50
1  
@thedeeno But what if your controller was using calls like request.path_parameters, request.query_parameters or request.request_parameters? If you still wanted to circumvent the router, you'd have to express which params came from where in another way. –  Kaleidoscope Mar 14 '13 at 18:13
    
@thedeeno And about the approach I suggested: I suppose I'm a little confused about some of your grievances. I'm not sure what you mean when you say, "how we get there might be different for each of them." I haven't run into a case yet where any of my controllers don't inherit directly or indirectly from ActionController::Base, so is it so bad to test an anonymous class inheriting from it? I do see your point about testing additional actions, but you really need to test only one anyway. The spec should be testing the functionality of your require_current_user equivalent, not the rails API. –  Kaleidoscope Mar 14 '13 at 18:21
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

One work around is to loosen the routing engine's constraints. This doesn't bypass routing, but it does make it easier to work with for testing.

Add something like the following to your specs:

before(:all) do
  Rails.application.routes.draw { match ':controller(/:action)' }
end
after(:all) do
  Rails.application.reload_routes!
end

While not strictly an answer to the question, it might be a good enough work around.

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