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What's the most efficient (in time) way of checking if two relatively short (about 3-8 elements) lists are shifted copies of one another? And if so, determine and return the offset?

Here is the example code and output I'd like:

>>> def is_shifted_copy(list_one, list_two):
>>>     # TODO
>>>
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3])
0
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
1
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [2, 3, 1])
2
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [3, 2, 1])
None
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [1])
None
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 1, 2], [2, 1, 1])
1

Lists may have duplicate entries. If more than one offset is valid, return any offset.

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2  
if the lists are shorts, why caring about time efficiency! –  Amine Hajyoussef Mar 14 '13 at 16:48
1  
Yeah, if speed is that important, you should use an alternative data structure. –  Henry Gomersall Mar 14 '13 at 17:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Searching two copies of the first list allows us to avoid performing excessive concatenation:

def is_shifted_copy(l1, l2):
    l1l1 = l1 * 2
    n = len(l1)
    return next((i for i in range(n) if l1l1[i:i + n] == l2), None)
share|improve this answer
    
3 lines, no try statements, performance very close to the best of the other solutions. Thanks! –  devtk Mar 14 '13 at 20:10
    
note: it is O(n**2) time, O(n) space. If n is large; @thkang solution that is O(n) time, O(1) space might be preferable. Though for n ~ 3..8 it doesn't matter. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '13 at 21:20

here's a simple iterator version that does the job in 2n iterations (n being the length of list)

import itertools

def is_shifted_copy(list1, list2):

    if len(list1) != len(list2):
        return False

    iterator = iter(list2)

    for i, item in enumerate(itertools.chain(list1, list1)):
        try:
            if item == iterator.next():
                continue
            else:
                iterator = iter(list2)
        except StopIteration:
            return i - len(list2)

    else:
        return False


print is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3]) #0
print is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2]) #2
print is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [3, 2, 1]) #False
print is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [2, 3, 1]) #1
print is_shifted_copy([1, 1, 2], [2, 1, 1]) #2
print is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [1]) #False
print is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 1], [2, 1, 1]) #1
print is_shifted_copy([1, 1, 1], [1, 1, 1]) #0

and from your specification,

shouldn't is_shifted_copy([1, 1, 2], [2, 1, 1]) return 2?

share|improve this answer
    
I think the spec is consistent. But that's a detail. I don't really care if you return 1 or 2, as long as it's consistent. –  devtk Mar 14 '13 at 17:03

Here is a solution based on indexes and slicing:

>>> def is_shifted_copy(l1, l2):
    try:
        return [l1[-i:] + l1[:-i] for i in range(len(l1))].index(l2)
    except ValueError:
        return None

The result is as expected:

>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3])
0
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
1
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [2, 3, 1])
2
>>> is_shifted_copy([1, 2, 3], [2, 1, 3])
None
share|improve this answer

Below is a modified version of NPE's solution, which checks for all possible match positions. It compares favorably to thkang's (and ecatmur's) clever iterator solutions:

import itertools as IT

def is_shifted_copy_thkang(list1, list2):
    N = len(list1)
    if N != len(list2):
        return None
    elif N == 0:
        return 0
    next_item = iter(list2).next
    for i, item in enumerate(IT.chain(list1, list1)):
        try:
            if item == next_item():
                continue
            else:
                next_item = iter(list2).next
        except StopIteration:
            return -i % N
    else:
        return None

def is_shifted_copy_NPE(list1, list2):
    N = len(list1)
    if N != len(list2):
        return None
    elif N == 0:
        return 0

    pos = -1
    first = list1[0]
    while pos < N:
        try:
            pos = list2.index(first, pos+1)
        except ValueError:
            break
        if (list2 + list2)[pos:pos+N] == list1:
            return pos
    return None

def is_shifted_copy_ecatmur(l1, l2):
    l1l1 = l1 * 2
    n = len(l1)
    return next((-i % n for i in range(n) if l1l1[i:i + n] == l2), None)


tests = [
    # ([], [], 0),    
    ([1, 2, 3], [1, 2, 3], 0),
    ([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2], 1),
    ([1, 2, 3], [2, 3, 1], 2),
    ([1, 2, 3], [3, 2, 1], None),
    ([1, 2, 3], [1], None),
    ([1, 1, 2], [2, 1, 1], 1),
    ([1,2,3,1,3,2], [1,3,2,1,2,3], 3)
    ]

for list1, list2, answer in tests:
    print(list1, list2, answer)
    assert is_shifted_copy_thkang(list1, list2) == answer
    assert is_shifted_copy_NPE(list1, list2) == answer    
    assert is_shifted_copy_ecatmur(list1, list2) == answer        

In [378]: %timeit is_shifted_copy_thkang([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.5 us per loop

In [377]: %timeit is_shifted_copy_ecatmur([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.37 us per loop

In [379]: %timeit is_shifted_copy_NPE([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.13 us per loop

Note: I changed the return value in is_shifted_copy_thkang and is_shifted_copy_ecatmur so that all three versions would pass the tests in the original post.

I benchmarked the functions with and without the change and found it does not significantly affect the performance of the functions.

For example, with return i:

In [384]: %timeit is_shifted_copy_thkang([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.38 us per loop

With return -i % N:

In [378]: %timeit is_shifted_copy_thkang([1, 2, 3], [3, 1, 2])
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.5 us per loop
share|improve this answer
    
why i % n if i in range(n)? Mere i should be enough. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '13 at 18:20
    
@J.F.Sebastian: Thanks for spotting the error. I had intended it to be -i % n for i in range(n)... (so all versions would pass the same tests) but somehow got a typo. –  unutbu Mar 14 '13 at 18:29
    
you could use next_item = iter(list2).next in @thkang's version. Shouldn't it return 0 in the else clause (empty lists case)? –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '13 at 18:42
1  
@J.F.Sebastian: I changed thkang's to use next_item = iter(list2).next since that improves the speed a bit. I fixed the thkang and NPE versions to return 0 when fed two empty lists, but I don't see a beautiful way to change ecatmur's code which is so pithy I don't want to touch it. The timings stay about the same. –  unutbu Mar 14 '13 at 20:28

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