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I'm currently scraping the output of netstat -n -A inet on Linux and netstat -n -f inet on Mac OSX to get a collection of remote IP addresses and ports to which the machine is connected using the following (Python default) regex:

'(?:[0-9]+\.){3}[0-9]+[.:][0-9]+\s+((?:[0-9]+\.){3}[0-9]+)[.:]([0-9]+)'

This gives me the remote IP in group 1 and the remote port in group 2.

However, this doesn't seem portable or maintainable (and is limited to IPv4 addresses).

Is there a better alternative to getting a list of active remote IPs?

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2 Answers 2

Well, there is always SNMP... The full TCP connection table is at .1.3.6.1.2.1.6.19 (also known as .iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.tcp.tcpConnectionTable) and the full UDP table is at .1.3.6.1.2.1.7.7 (also known as .iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.udp.udpEndpointTable).

Here is an example of my local Linux box:

$ snmpbulkwalk -v2c -c xxxx -m ALL 83.137.17.100 .iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.tcp.tcpConnectionTable
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv4."83.137.17.100".44463.ipv4."91.189.89.90".80 = INTEGER: timeWait(11)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv4."83.137.17.100".44470.ipv4."91.189.89.90".80 = INTEGER: timeWait(11)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51612 = INTEGER: timeWait(11)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51622 = INTEGER: timeWait(11)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51623 = INTEGER: timeWait(11)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51624 = INTEGER: finWait2(7)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:f7:0a:da".59728 = INTEGER: timeWait(11)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionState.ipv6."20:01:40:38:00:00:00:16:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:16".22.ipv6."2a:00:86:40:00:01:00:00:54:f4:06:96:6c:48:aa:a9".49644 = INTEGER: established(5)
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv4."83.137.17.100".44463.ipv4."91.189.89.90".80 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv4."83.137.17.100".44470.ipv4."91.189.89.90".80 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51612 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51622 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51623 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:55:f2:7b".51624 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:89:11:64".80.ipv6."00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:ff:ff:53:f7:0a:da".59728 = Gauge32: 0
TCP-MIB::tcpConnectionProcess.ipv6."20:01:40:38:00:00:00:16:00:00:00:00:00:00:00:16".22.ipv6."2a:00:86:40:00:01:00:00:54:f4:06:96:6c:48:aa:a9".49644 = Gauge32: 0

The Net-SNMP tools make the output a little bit more readable. In numerical form the first output line would be:

1.3.6.1.2.1.6.19.1.7.1.4.83.137.17.100.44463.1.4.91.189.89.90.80 = INTEGER: 11

Or in fully expanded text:

.iso.org.dod.internet.mgmt.mib-2.tcp.tcpConnectionTable.tcpConnectionEntry.tcpConnectionState.ipv4."83.137.17.100".44463.ipv4."91.189.89.90".80

I'm not sure if this is any easier than what you are doing now, but it is a standardised way...

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Thanks for reminding me of SNMP. There does happen to be a Python interface PySNMP –  OregonTrail Mar 16 '13 at 19:59

If you're not scared of C and U*X internals you could reverse engineer netstat.

Take a look here http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/21503/source-code-of-netstat

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I've considered it, and I may do just that. –  OregonTrail Mar 16 '13 at 19:58

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