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new C#er here. I'm making a text based adventure through a console app. I made a map command where when you type "map" it shows you a map with an X indicating your current location. Int variables xCoordinate and yCoordinate are used to represent character location on the map and change by 1 whenever you type "go north" or "go south" etc. The map is 13x10, so there are 130 possible places for your character to be. I made 130 different if statements and it works just fine. My question is if there is a more efficient/easier way of doing this. Here is what my code looks like:

    public static void Map()

    {
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Cyan;
        Console.WriteLine("\n" + xCoordinate + ", " + yCoordinate);
        Console.WriteLine("\nTowns are represented by a \"T\". Current location is shown as an \"X\".\n");
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.DarkGray;
        if ((xCoordinate == -7) && (yCoordinate == -4))
        {
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ] 5\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ] 4\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ] 3\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ] 2\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ] 1\n");
            Console.Write("[T][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][T][ ] 0\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ]-1\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ]-2\n");
            Console.Write("[ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ][ ][T][ ][ ]-3\n");
            Console.Write("[X][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ][ ]-4\n");
            Console.Write("-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1  0  1  2  3  4  5\n\n");
        }
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
  }

Again, I have the map typed out 130 times in 130 different if statements, each time the X is somewhere else. I would think there would be a better way to do this, but I have no idea.

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closed as off topic by Ondrej Tucny, Daniel A. White, FAngel, ColinE, Jason Mar 14 '13 at 17:17

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8  
This question is a better fit for codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Ondrej Tucny Mar 14 '13 at 17:14
11  
+1 for the persistance of writing that 130 times before thinking "There must be a better way" :-| –  Jamiec Mar 14 '13 at 17:15
2  
Or DailyWTF perhaps? –  Jason Sperske Mar 14 '13 at 17:15
6  
Is it wrong that I want to see the entire 130 if loops? –  glosrob Mar 14 '13 at 17:16
8  
Something you'll learn as you continue to program is that any time you duplicate code even once, you're probably doing something wrong. This is often called the DRY Principle: Don't Repeat Yourself. Duplicating code 130 times is a pretty strong sign that there's an easier way. The next step in your programming education should be to learn about the difference between representation and display. What you want is a data structure that represents the state of the game, and then display logic that puts it on the screen. –  Eric Lippert Mar 14 '13 at 17:23
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2 Answers

You should read and learn about loops like for.

Something along lines

for(var xCoordinate  = -10; xCoordinate  <=10; xCoordinate ++)
{
   for(var yCoordinate = 5; yCoordinate >= 5; yCoordinate --)
   {
      if (xCoordinate  == ... && yCoordinate == ..)
      { 
         Console.Write("[X]");
      }
      else
      { 
         Console.Write("[ ]");
      }
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}
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    public static void Map()
    {
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Cyan;
        Console.WriteLine("\n" + xCoordinate + ", " + yCoordinate);
        Console.WriteLine("\nTowns are represented by a \"T\". Current location is shown as an \"X\".\n");
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.DarkGray;

        for (int y = 5; y >= -4; y--)
        {
            for (int x = -7; x <= 5; x++)
            {
                Console.Write(yCoordinate == y && xCoordinate == x ? "[X]" : "[ ]");
            }
            Console.WriteLine(" {0}", y);
        }
        Console.Write("-7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1  0  1  2  3  4  5\n\n");
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
What about the T's in the original? –  Jamiec Mar 14 '13 at 17:23
1  
gist.github.com/jasonsperske/5163529, because I obsessively can't help myself :P –  Jason Sperske Mar 14 '13 at 17:57
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