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I'm writing a Qt GUI program in conjuction with OpenCV to create a people tracking application. OpenCV has a lot of functions that take a matrix as input and output, for example a color conversion one:

cvtColor(inputArray src, outputArray dst, int code, int dstCn=0);

Mat is the default matrix class of OpenCV, and assuming I have a Mat object called frame, I would implement the function like this to change its properties:

cvtColor(frame, frame, CV_RGB2HSV,0);

Is there any downside on using the same variable as input and output on any function? or should I create a copy first?

or should I look in every function documentation?

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possible dup: stackoverflow.com/questions/13477694/… –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 14 '13 at 17:23
    
In the general case, you're almost certainly going to have to look at the documentation and, perhaps, even the source code of the function in question to determine if this sort of thing is safe or not. But in this specific case, no you cannot. –  Nik Bougalis Mar 14 '13 at 17:26
    
Thanks, that was just an example, in this one does not work, but I've implemented other functions with this method and they seem to work ok so I guess you're right. –  jtafurth Mar 14 '13 at 17:40
    
actually, I just found some part where I pass the same variable on the cvtColor function and it works flawlessly, so I guess its possible. The variable is a private member of the class. –  jtafurth Mar 14 '13 at 18:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think it's a personal choice. Here's some personal samples:

Take readonly input, a reference to the output and, after you process the input, push it to the output. Optional error result friendly.

bool function(const type& input, type& output){
    output = input;
    return true;
}

Take readonly input, assign it to output, change output and return it (C++11 move optimized).

type function(const type& input){
    type output = input;
    return output;
}
type output = function(input);

Here you force a new copy of the object as the argument and you can use it and return it (C++11 best when you don't want to alter your copy). See also: Want speed, pass by value..

type function(type input){
    // modify input
    return input;
}
type output = function(input);
  1. Input and output in the same argument. Use with caution. Can return error.

    bool function(type& put){ return true; }

It depends on your design. Don't need errors?... use a movable one. Need errors?... use one that leaves the return value accessible to you. Or, just follow existing practices but know how each can help or penalize your performance like:

// this makes a pointless copy for the input (use const ref here)
bool function(type input, type& output){
    output = input;
    return true;
}

(Right way is)

bool function(const type& input, type& output){
    output = input;
    return true;
}

PS: Personal opinion of a self taught C++ dev :)

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This is a personal choice. If you don't need the input image later then by all means do it. I already tried it actually, it works most of times but some other times it works poorly. it depends on the function you're using.

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