Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to make a vector, then enter a while cycle, use that vector, then, resize the vector at the end of each cycle. So I decided to make my_vector.clear() at the end of the cycle and a my_vector.resize(newSize) at the beginning of it. Here's a sample code:

typedef struct my_type{
    int numNextDom;
    bool knockedDown;
} my_type;

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
    int i, testCase, totalDom, numLines, num_dom=0, num_next_dom=0, aux_map_int = 0, linesScanned = 0;
    bool firstTime=true;

    std::cin>>testCase;
    std::vector<my_type> my_vector;

    while(aux_map_int < testCase){

        std::cin>>totalSize>>numLines;

        my_vector.resize(totalSize);

        while (linesScanned < numLines) {
            std::cin>>num_dom>>num_next_dom;

            if(firstTime){
                my_vector[0].numNextDom = totalSize;
                my_vector[0].knockedDown = true;
                firstTime=false;
            }
            my_vector[num_dom].numNextDom = num_next_dom;
            my_vector[num_dom].knockedDown = false;

            linesScanned++;
        }

        std::cout << giveResult(my_vector) << std::endl;
        aux_map_int++;
        my_vector.clear();
    }

    return 0;
}

So you see, after I make my_vector.clean() the vector becomes os size 1, but then, when the loop is re-done, my_vector stays of size 1 and doesn't do the my_vector.resize(totalSize). Am I missing anything?

share|improve this question
    
How are you determining the size? –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 14 '13 at 18:09
    
" the vector becomes os size 1" <- how are you getting this size? The size() of the vector should be 0 after a clear; capacity() should not change. sizeof will report something totally different...is that what you're using? –  Crazy Eddie Mar 14 '13 at 18:09
    
@sftrabbit doesn't resize does that? @CrazyEddie yes, that's what I was using.. –  FriedRike Mar 14 '13 at 18:11
    
@FriedRike You're doing sizeof(my_vector)? –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 14 '13 at 18:18
    
@sftrabbit actually no, my mistake. I has a function to print my_vectorand it only printed one element. So I assumed it only had size of 1 –  FriedRike Mar 14 '13 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I ran your code and the vector is correctly resized.

I think your problem is that you are not resetting linesScanned after the first test, so if totalSize is smaller on the second iteration of the loop than it was on the first one, you will not enter the body of the second loop at all. Even if it is bigger the second time, you will not get the behaviour you expect.

You can fix this issue by adding linesScanned = 0; as the first statement of the outer loop, i.e. just after while(aux_map_int < testCase){

Also, I suggest you use for loops, as they are cleaner and would help you avoid such mistakes in the future.

Here is the program that I tested:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int totalSize = 0;

typedef struct my_type{
    int numNextDom;
    bool knockedDown;
} my_type;

int giveResult(std::vector<my_type>);

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
    int i, testCase, totalDom, numLines, num_dom=0, num_next_dom=0, aux_map_int = 0, linesScanned = 0;
    bool firstTime=true;

    std::cin>>testCase;
    std::vector<my_type> my_vector;

    while(aux_map_int < testCase){

        std::cin>>totalSize>>numLines;

        my_vector.resize(totalSize);
        std::cout << "my_vector.size(): " << my_vector.size() << std::endl;
        std::cout << "linesScanned: " << linesScanned << std::endl;
        std::cout << "numLines: " << numLines << std::endl;

        while (linesScanned < numLines) {
            std::cin>>num_dom>>num_next_dom;

            if(firstTime){
                my_vector[0].numNextDom = totalSize;
                my_vector[0].knockedDown = true;
                firstTime=false;
            }
            my_vector[num_dom].numNextDom = num_next_dom;
            my_vector[num_dom].knockedDown = false;

            linesScanned++;
        }

        std::cout << giveResult(my_vector) << std::endl;
        aux_map_int++;
        my_vector.clear();
    }

    return 0;
}

int giveResult(std::vector<my_type>) {
    return 0;
}

And this is the interaction session from my console:

2
2 2
my_vector.size(): 2
linesScanned: 0
numLines: 2
5 5
6 6
0
3 2
my_vector.size(): 3
linesScanned: 2
numLines: 2

Here you can see that linesScanned is not reset and is going to cause a problem.

Here is correct (with respect to this problem) version of your main function:

int main (int argc, char * const argv[]) {
    int i, testCase, totalDom, numLines, num_dom=0, num_next_dom=0, aux_map_int = 0, linesScanned = 0;
    bool firstTime=true;

    std::cin>>testCase;
    std::vector<my_type> my_vector;

    while(aux_map_int < testCase){
        linesScanned = 0;
        std::cin>>totalSize>>numLines;

        my_vector.resize(totalSize);

        while (linesScanned < numLines) {
            std::cin>>num_dom>>num_next_dom;

            if(firstTime){
                my_vector[0].numNextDom = totalSize;
                my_vector[0].knockedDown = true;
                firstTime=false;
            }
            my_vector[num_dom].numNextDom = num_next_dom;
            my_vector[num_dom].knockedDown = false;

            linesScanned++;
        }

        std::cout << giveResult(my_vector) << std::endl;
        aux_map_int++;
        my_vector.clear();
    }

    return 0;
}

I hope that clears it up.

-Stan

share|improve this answer
    
I almost killed myself when I saw your answer... Thank you so much! –  FriedRike Mar 14 '13 at 18:43
    
You're welcome :) –  stanm Mar 14 '13 at 18:47
    
I would appreciate it if you accept the answer. –  stanm Mar 15 '13 at 11:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.