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Given a basic object like the following my inclination (based on working with AS3) is that $friend could be interpreted $this->friend but the PHP parser only sees $friend as an uninitialized variable localized to the holler function. Is there a way to access member variables without using $this->? My goal is to discover the leanest possible syntax.

class MyBuddy
{
   private $friend = true;

   public function holler()
   {
       if ( $friend ) // <- parser won't resolve $friend to a member variable
          return 'Heeeeey Buuuuuday!';
       else
          return null;
   }
}

Update: After considering the answers given it seems that the most concise and easy to understand approach is to pass the instance variable by reference to a function level variable at the top of a function. It's a decent solution for functions which reference verbose instance variables.

// Demonstrating a simple cache which abbreviates $this->thingCollection 
// to $things for the function body
public function getThing( $id, $qty )
{
   $things = &$this->thingCollection; // <-- pass by reference

   if ( empty($things) )
      $things = [];

   if ( empty($things[$id]) )
      $things[ $productId ] = [];

   if ( empty($things[ $id ][ $qty ]) )
      $things[ $id ][ $qty ] = get_thing_from_database( $id, $qty );

   return $things[ $id ][ $qty ];
}
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2  
What's wrong with $this? –  Jefffrey Mar 14 '13 at 18:53
    
Readable is usually better than lean in my experience. –  ficuscr Mar 14 '13 at 18:55
1  
Coming from a background where it was not required it feels like six extra characters that add zero meaning to my understanding of what's happening in a class, where isolation is implied. –  Mark Fox Mar 14 '13 at 19:05
    
Personally I think ActionScript is prettier than almost any other language outside possibly C#, so you are in for it - I think PHP is ugly too, but we have to live with it. –  ktamlyn Mar 14 '13 at 19:17
    
@MarkFox - You speak to why I work with php and lose my mind in strong-typed languages. Why do I have to indicate the type of the variable then again when I set the value of the variable? But I have an English degree with a minor in Rhetoric, which means things are supposed to be elegant. Try saying that in a CS class though and you'll get laughed out the room by a horde of frat boys and warlocks who can't imagine not putting string in front of their strings. –  Anthony Mar 14 '13 at 19:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue is that php doesn't consider them one in the same, thus allowing a specific method to have a local variable with that properties name. For instance:

class MyBuddy
{
   private $friend = true;

   public function holler($friend)
   {
       if ($this->friend == $friend ) // <- parser won't resolve $friend to a member variable
          return 'Heeeeey Buuuuuday!';
       else
          return null;
   }
}

define("HELL_NAW", false);
define("MMM_HMMM", true);

$hombre = new MyBuddy();
echo $hombre -> holler(HELL_NAW);

$l_jessie = new MyBuddy();
echo $l_jessie -> holler(MMM_HMMM);

So to get what you're after, you could go with:

 public function holler()
   {
       $friend = $this ->friend;
       if ($friend )
          return 'Heeeeey Buuuuuday!';
       else
          return null;
   }

But that might be called the opposite of lean. But it does also illustrate the point (and Alex's) that php isn't set up with your Responsibility Principle in mind and you'll end up doing more work to make things harder for the next guy to achieve a goal based on principle but will appear to be aesthetic to anyone else.

On the other hand, php does have the magic methods __get() and __set() which allow for referencing non-defined or inaccessible properties by defining how they are handled. With that, you wouldn't need to reference $this->friend since it doesn't exist. Just reference the argument for the method (which is handy but will again just make things a cluster-bate to look at).

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Your answer does illustrate a step towards a solution, so I'll +1, but I'm looking for something that happens a little more behind the scenes. Maybe something that could be defined as a trait so it could decorate any number of classes. –  Mark Fox Mar 14 '13 at 19:41
    
Well yeah, I'm not going to write a full app to make a point, homie. Trait is a good word, as your example seemed a bit flawed (as was mine) as the class name and the defined variable sort of side-step the scenario where either $this->friend or $friend is not true (I mean heck, he's obviously your buddy, look at his class). I'm assuming you're aware of the introduction of traits in 5.4 and it's not the same thing or doesn't fit what you're after? –  Anthony Mar 14 '13 at 19:49
    
Something else to consider might be to declare the variable as global in scope then use $GLOBAL['friend']. You get 4 more characters you don't want, but maybe GLOBAL is more semantically true (since you want it to be use across classes, ie globally), than $this. –  Anthony Mar 14 '13 at 19:50
    
No, I don't want a global… –  Mark Fox Apr 10 '13 at 21:07
    
So I've been using this pattern more, and I'd just add that's probably better to pass as a reference, like $friend = &$this->friend otherwise changes won't happen on the instance variable. –  Mark Fox Apr 10 '13 at 21:08

Do not invent clever workarounds that developers maintaining the code after you will have a hard time understanding. The way PHP does it is using $this, and you should embrace the conventions of language.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate your point of view but curiosity requires an investigation. Also, this answer is more like a comment, it doesn't attempt to address the technical feasibility of my inquiry. –  Mark Fox Mar 14 '13 at 19:11
    
Mark, I suggest you remove the word "clever" and "workaround" and you might get your answer. –  ktamlyn Mar 14 '13 at 19:15
    
Yeah, poor choice of words. –  Mark Fox Mar 14 '13 at 19:29
    
@MarkFox Next time go with "cunning" and "hack". –  Anthony Mar 14 '13 at 19:35
    
Hahah, "hack" actually got edited out of my initial draft. –  Mark Fox Mar 14 '13 at 19:44

I am sympathetic to your question because I almost posted it myself. This is a case in which what you want to do is more readable to you, but won't be to another PHP developer expecting standard use of $this-> when targeting class level objects.

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