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I am a novice at Apache redirectives but have learned how to process clean urls that are generated by PHP on my site, which are working perfectly.

I have been researching this question and cannot seem to find a simple, straight answer.

My question is will a crawler/spider/bot use the link php shows on my site: example.com\Shoes\Running\Men or will they use the RewriteRule url: example.com\subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3 as the one that will end up showing in the search engines? (See my .htaccess below)

Also I have seen the PT|passthrough flag used like in the following example: Apache.org - Redirecting and Remapping with mod_rewrite

Is that something I should be using in my case?

Thanks so much for any clarification on this subject.

My .htaccess file:

RewriteEngine on

# do not do anything if already existing file, symbolic link or directory
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -l [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule .+ - [L]

# redirect clean url (/category) for processing
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)$ ./cat_lookup.php?c=$1 [L,B]
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/$ ./cat_lookup.php?c=$1 [L,B]

# redirect clean url (/category/subcategory) for processing
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/([^/]+)$ ./subcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2 [L,B]
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/([^/]+)/$ ./subcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2 [L,B]

# redirect clean url (/category/subcategory/subsubcategory) for processing
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/([^/]+)/([^/]+)$ ./subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3 [L,B]
RewriteRule ^([^/]+)/([^/]+)/([^/]+)/$ ./subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3 [L,B]
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My question is will a crawler/spider/bot use the link php shows on my site: example.com\Shoes\Running\Men or will they use the RewriteRule url: example.com\subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3 as the one that will end up showing in the search engines?

Since this rewriting happens internally on your server (unless you are using explicit redirects) – how you any spider even come to know these internal URLs …?

Spiders follow links they find on the web – and if only example.com/Shoes/Running/Men is linked in your pages, where would they find the other version?

Anyway, to make sure the “right” URLs get listed – add a link element with rel=canonical and give the URL you want to be used there. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canonical_link_element

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I will read up on rel=canonical wasn't aware of that. The only place the 'other' version (example.com\subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3) is found is in my .htaccess as shown above, but wasn't clear if spiders ever saw or knew the 'other' URL existed when using RewriteRule with no R flag. Thank you. –  Rodney Mar 16 '13 at 0:55

This depends on crawler implementation. For example, I can write a crawler which stores the original URL (not the one given by .htaccess using rewriting) then uncleaned URL's will be stored in my DB otherwise the clean URL will be stored. As far as I know, crawlers like google etc store the clean (rewritten) URL's. You can try using apache nutch to see what the default behavior of most crawlers is.

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So you're saying that in my above scenario the link that google would end up showing in the search results would be example.com\subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3 and not example.com\Shoes\Running\Men –  Rodney Mar 15 '13 at 16:43
1  
No mature crawlers like google will store the second one example.com\shoes\running\men. But there can be crawlers which can store the other link too. Depends on implementation. –  abhinav Mar 15 '13 at 19:57
    
Thanks for info. Wasn't sure if you looked at my .htaccess above, but example.com\shoes\running\men is actually the first link (on site) the rewritten one (example.com\subsubcat_lookup.php?c=$1&s=$2&ss=$3) is the second that does the actual processing. –  Rodney Mar 16 '13 at 0:58

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