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I'm trying to make a generic observer pattern, modeled after a headFirst Design Patterns example. I get an error at the line marked with ??? below.

ERROR message says : The method registerObserver(Observer) in the type Subject is not applicable for the arguments (CurrentConditionsDisplay)

package be.intec.Meteo.Codemeteo;

import be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.DisplayElement;
import be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Observer;
import be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Subject;
//import javax.servlet.annotation.WebServlet;

//@supressWarning("unchecked")
public class CurrentConditionsDisplay implements Observer, DisplayElement {
    private float temperature;
    private float humidity;
    private Subject weatherData;

    public CurrentConditionsDisplay(Subject weatherData) {
        this.weatherData = weatherData;
             weatherData.registerObserver(this); // ??? Error: The method registerObserver(Observer) in the type Subject is not applicable for the arguments (CurrentConditionsDisplay)
    }

    public void update(float temperature, float humidity, float pressure) {
        this.temperature = temperature;
        this.humidity = humidity;
        display();
    }

    public void display() {
        System.out.println("Current conditions: " + temperature 
            + "F degrees and " + humidity + "% humidity");
    }
}

Interface 1

package be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces;

import java.util.Observer;
public interface Subject {
    public void registerObserver(Observer o);
    public void removeObserver(Observer o);
    public void notifyObservers();
}

Interface 2

package be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces;

public interface Observer {
    public void update(float temp, float humidity, float pressure);
}

Interface 3

package be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces;

public interface DisplayElement {
    public void display();
}

Weatherdata class

package be.intec.Meteo.Codemeteo;

import java.util.ArrayList;

import be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Observer;
import be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Subject;

public class WeatherData implements Subject {
    private ArrayList observers;
    private float temperature;
    private float humidity;
    private float pressure;

    public WeatherData() {
        observers = new ArrayList();
    }

    @Override
    public void registerObserver(java.util.Observer o) {
        observers.add(o);

    }

    @Override
    public void removeObserver(java.util.Observer o) {
        int i = observers.indexOf(o);
        if (i >= 0) {

            observers.remove(i);
        }

    }

    @Override
    public void notifyObservers() {
        for (int i = 0; i < observers.size(); i++) {
            Observer observer = (Observer) observers.get(i);
            observer.update(temperature, humidity, pressure);

        }
    }

    public void mesurementChanged() {
        notifyObservers();
    }

    public void setMeasurements(float temperature, float humidity,
            float pressure) {
        this.temperature = temperature;
        this.humidity = humidity;
        this.pressure = pressure;

    }

    // other weather data methos here
}

Tester class

package be.intec.Meteo.Codemeteo;

import java.util.*;

public class WeatherStation {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        WeatherData weatherData = new WeatherData();

        CurrentConditionsDisplay currentDisplay = new CurrentConditionsDisplay(
                weatherData);
        // StatisticsDisplay statisticsDisplay = new
        // StatisticsDisplay(weatherData);
        // ForecastDisplay forecastDisplay = new ForecastDisplay(weatherData);

        weatherData.setMeasurements(80, 65, 30.4f);
        weatherData.setMeasurements(82, 70, 29.2f);
        weatherData.setMeasurements(78, 90, 29.2f);
    }
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Tim Bender, Lipis, Andrew, p.s.w.g, Troy Alford Mar 14 '13 at 20:26

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your Subject interface is importing the wrong Observer class.

You have:

import java.util.Observer;
public interface Subject {

You need:

import be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Observer;
public interface Subject {
share|improve this answer
    
It is a very poor choice to name a class with the same name as a class from the JDK, for exactly this reason: your IDE will tend to automatically import the JDK class, as will the brains of any readers of your code. Pick a another name! –  Bohemian Mar 14 '13 at 19:35
    
Thank you. My mystake. I think i should get some rest now. Thank you again. –  Rahoul Mar 14 '13 at 19:38
    
@Bohemian I disagree and there are many cases where frameworks make use of the more common names (e.g. File). When there is a conflict, both Eclipse and Netbeans ask the developer to pick the right class to import. –  Tim Bender Mar 14 '13 at 19:40
    
Yes but so often the programmer picks the wrong one by mistake and you get exactly this problem - and lots of wasted time –  Bohemian Mar 14 '13 at 22:41

You are trying to call WeatherData.registerObserver(java.util.Observer) withthis as a parameter. But as an instance of be.intec.Meteo.Codemeteo.CurrentConditionsDisplay only implements the be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Observer and be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.DisplayElement interfaces, that causes the compile error.

A couple of observations:

  • Java packages should be all lowercase (makes it easier to distinguish as to what's a class and what's a package)
  • Usually it's easier if your class names don't share the name with other classes to avoid confusion such as this (be.intec.Meteo.Interfaces.Observer vs java.util.Observer
share|improve this answer
    
-1 because I think the second bullet point is terrible advice. You can't use pretty much any framework out there without having class naming conflicts. The real problem is just inexperience/carelessness while choosing imports. –  Tim Bender Mar 14 '13 at 19:37
    
I'm not saying never share any class names, but I wouldn't choose class names shared with JRE classes as it's may well lead to confusion and in my view reduces the maintainability. Especially as the java.util.Observer class is used in the code as well. –  beny23 Mar 14 '13 at 19:57

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