Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a StyleDocument to display my content in a JTextPane. I searched for a while and saw that I can write with the HTMLEditorKit the document I get from the textpane to a file. But when I want to read this file with the HTMLEditorKit it doesn't parse in the right document. I get two different results:

  1. I get the plain html code in my textpane
  2. I get no content in my textpane

Saving:

Document doc = textpane.getStyledDocument();
HTMLEditorKit kit = new HTMLEditorKit();
kit.write(new FileOutputStream("path"), doc, 0, doc.getLength());

Loading (2 versions):

HTMLEditorKit kit = new HTMLEditorKit();
Document doc = null;
Document doc2 = kit.createDefaultDocument();

kit.read(new FileInputStream("path"), doc, 0);
kit.read(new FileInputStream("path"), doc2, 0);

textpane.setDocument(doc);
textpane.setDocument(doc2);
share|improve this question
1  
If you want to render arbitrary HTML in a Java app, it's probably a better idea to use a "real" HTML engine like WebKit. JavaFX includes a binding for it in WebView: docs.oracle.com/javafx/2/webview/jfxpub-webview.htm –  millimoose Mar 14 '13 at 19:39
    
Here's the story,.. I initially insert some formatted text (like bold for headlines etc.) - now the user can add some more text, then I want to save this text WITH the format.. I don't want to display a html-file or something like that –  Christian 'fuzi' Orgler Mar 15 '13 at 9:43
    
did you check the saved file after it is written to it. open with a browser and see if it shows up correctly. also you might want to use inputstreamreader for encoding. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/i18n/text/stream.html –  btevfik Mar 19 '13 at 8:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you initialize your JTextPane add the following line: textpane.setContentType("text/html");

Change Saving to look like this:

Document document = textpane.getStyledDocument();
EditorKit kit = textpane.getEditorKit();
kit.write(new FileOutputStream(new File("path")), doc, 0, doc.getLength());

Change Loading to look like this:

EditorKit kit = pane2.getEditorKit();
Document doc = kit.createDefaultDocument();
kit.read(new FileInputStream(new File("path")), doc, 0);
textpane.setDocument(doc);

Using this setup in my test environment I was able to set the text in a JTextPane to some html, get the html from the pane, write it to a file and subsequently read it back from that same file. I didn't see any reason to use a HTMLEditorKit as you are not doing anything html specific however you can change that as you see fit.

share|improve this answer

You need to set the content type of the JTextPane to "text/html" JEditorPane API. This should display the html correctly then.

share|improve this answer

I guess that you don't want to change the code written to save. So let it to be as it is.
You need to change the LOADING code as follows:

HTMLEditorKit kit = new HTMLEditorKit();
StyledDocument doc2 = (StyledDocument)kit.createDefaultDocument();
kit.read(new FileInputStream(file), doc2, 0);
pane = new JTextPane();
pane.setEditorKit(kit);//set EditorKit of JTextPane as kit.
pane.setDocument(doc2);

For example consider the code Demo given below:

import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.text.*;
import javax.swing.text.html.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.io.*;

public class HTMLKit extends JFrame implements ActionListener{
     public static final String text = "As told by Wikipedia\n"
    +"Java is a general-purpose, concurrent, class-based, object-oriented computer programming language."
    + "It is specifically designed to have as few implementation "
    + "dependencies as possible. It is intended to let application developers write once, run anywhere (WORA), "
    + "meaning that code that runs on one platform does not need to be recompiled to run on another. "
    + "Java applications are typically compiled to bytecode (class file) that can run on any Java virtual "
    + "machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. Java is, as of 2012, one of the most popular programming "
    + "languages in use, particularly for client-server web applications, with a reported 10 million users.";
    JTextPane pane ;
    DefaultStyledDocument doc ;
    StyleContext sc;
    JButton save;
    JButton load;
    JScrollPane jsp;
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        try 
        {
            UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsLookAndFeel");
            SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable()
            {
                public void run()
                {
                    HTMLKit se = new HTMLKit();
                    se.createAndShowGUI();
                }
            });
        } catch (Exception evt) {}
    }
    public void createAndShowGUI()
    {
        setTitle("TextPane");
        sc = new StyleContext();
        doc = new DefaultStyledDocument(sc);
        pane = new JTextPane(doc);
        save = new JButton("Save");
        load = new JButton("Load");
        JPanel panel = new JPanel();
        panel.add(save);panel.add(load);
        save.addActionListener(this);load.addActionListener(this);
        final Style heading2Style = sc.addStyle("Heading2", null);
        heading2Style.addAttribute(StyleConstants.Foreground, Color.red);
        heading2Style.addAttribute(StyleConstants.FontSize, new Integer(16));
        heading2Style.addAttribute(StyleConstants.FontFamily, "serif");
        heading2Style.addAttribute(StyleConstants.Bold, new Boolean(true));
        try 
        {
            doc.insertString(0, text, null);
            doc.setParagraphAttributes(0, 1, heading2Style, false);
        } catch (Exception e) 
        {
            System.out.println("Exception when constructing document: " + e);
            System.exit(1);
        }
        jsp = new JScrollPane(pane);
        getContentPane().add(jsp);
        getContentPane().add(panel,BorderLayout.SOUTH);
        setSize(400, 300);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        setVisible(true);
    }
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt)
    {
        if (evt.getSource() == save)
        {
            save();
        }
        else if (evt.getSource() == load)
        {
            load();
        }
    }
    private void save()
    {
        JFileChooser chooser = new JFileChooser(".");
        chooser.setDialogTitle("Save");
        int returnVal = chooser.showSaveDialog(this);
        if(returnVal == JFileChooser.APPROVE_OPTION) 
        {
            File file = chooser.getSelectedFile();
            if (file != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    Document doc = pane.getStyledDocument();
                    HTMLEditorKit kit = new HTMLEditorKit();
                    kit.write(new FileOutputStream(file), doc, 0, doc.getLength());
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Saved successfully!!","Success",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            else 
            {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Please enter a fileName","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
            }
        }
    }
    private void load()
    {
        JFileChooser chooser = new JFileChooser(".");
        chooser.setDialogTitle("Open");
        chooser.setFileSelectionMode(JFileChooser.FILES_ONLY);
        int returnVal = chooser.showOpenDialog(this);
        if(returnVal == JFileChooser.APPROVE_OPTION) 
        {
            File file = chooser.getSelectedFile();
            if (file!= null)
            {
                try
                {
                    HTMLEditorKit kit = new HTMLEditorKit();
                    StyledDocument doc2 = (StyledDocument)kit.createDefaultDocument();
                    kit.read(new FileInputStream(file), doc2, 0);
                    JTextPane pane1 = new JTextPane();
                    pane1.setEditorKit(kit);
                    pane1.setDocument(doc2);
                    repaint();
                    jsp.setViewportView(pane1);
                    repaint();
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Loaded successfully!!","Success",JOptionPane.INFORMATION_MESSAGE);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    ex.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            else 
            {
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(this,"Please enter a fileName","Error",JOptionPane.ERROR_MESSAGE);
            }
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

You can display your html in a JEditorPane like this:

    private void AboutGame()
    {
        JEditorPane Log = CreateEditorPane("AboutGame.html");

        JScrollPane LogScrollPanel = new JScrollPane(Log);
        LogScrollPanel.setVerticalScrollBarPolicy
                            (JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS);
        LogScrollPanel.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(800, 400));
        LogScrollPanel.setMinimumSize(new Dimension(10, 10));

        Object Message = LogScrollPanel;

        JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, 
                                          Message, "About Game", 1);
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.