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I am new to C#, literally on page 50, and i am curious as to how to write these variables in one line of code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace consoleHelloWorld
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            int mon = DateTime.Today.Month;
            int da = DateTime.Today.Day;
            int yer = DateTime.Today.Year;
            var time = DateTime.Now;

            Console.Write(mon);
            Console.Write("." + da);
            Console.WriteLine("." + yer);
        }
    }
}

I am coming from JavaScript where to do this it would look like this:

document.write(mon+'.'+da+'.'+yer);

Any help here is appreciated.

share|improve this question

Look into composite formatting:

Console.WriteLine("{0}.{1}.{2}", mon, da, yer);

You could also write (although it's not really recommended):

Console.WriteLine(mon + "." + da + "." + yer);
share|improve this answer
    
why is the second way not recommended? – Ga ber-ber Mar 14 '13 at 19:39
    
OK great! Thanks I haven't gotten to composite formatting. but I was not closing the ToString with () thus the issue. I am still on types right now but this is valuable insight moving forward... – Erik Grosskurth Mar 14 '13 at 19:43
    
@AStidham: Not recommended because it's longer, more difficult to see what's going on, more difficult to modify, and less amenable to internationalization. – Jim Mischel Mar 14 '13 at 19:45
    
@JimMischel The ToString() calls are not needed in the second example. – Servy Mar 14 '13 at 19:46
    
@Servy: Good catch. I didn't realize that the compiler would do that. Shows you how often I do string concatenation, doesn't it? – Jim Mischel Mar 14 '13 at 20:00

You can do your whole program in one line! Yes, that is right, one line!

Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy.MM.dd"));

You may notice that I did not use the same date format as you. That is because you should use the International Date Format as described in this W3C document. Every time you don't use it, somewhere a cute little animal dies.

share|improve this answer
    
He's printing MM.dd.yyyy, but the idea is still correct. – Servy Mar 14 '13 at 19:47
2  
Thanks for that, didn't notice. Will amend this response to chastise him for his poor choice of date format. – Malcolm O'Hare Mar 14 '13 at 19:49
2  
Not just a single line, but a single function call :) Console.WriteLine("{0:yyyy.MM.dd}", DateTime.Now); – Stephen Kennedy Jun 17 '13 at 15:27
    
@StephenKennedy Nice. – Malcolm O'Hare Jun 18 '13 at 15:11

You can do pretty much the same as in JavaScript. Try this:

Console.WriteLine(mon + "." + da + "." + yer);

Or you can use WriteLine as if it were a string.Format statement by doing:

Console.WriteLine("{0}.{1}.{2}", mon, da, yer);

which is equivalent to:

string.Format("{0}.{1}.{2}", mon, da, yer);

The number of parameters can be infinite, just make sure you correctly index those numbers (starting at 0).

share|improve this answer

If you want to use something similar to the JavaScript, you just need to convert to strings first:

Console.WriteLine(mon.ToString() + "." + da.ToString() + "." + yer.ToString());

But a (much) better way would be to use the format option:

Console.WriteLine("{0}.{1}.{2}", mon, da, yer);
share|improve this answer
    
OK great! Thanks I haven't gotten to composite formatting. but I was not closing the ToString with () thus the issue. I am still on types right now but this is valuable insight moving forward... – Erik Grosskurth Mar 14 '13 at 19:43

You should try this one:

Console.WriteLine("{0}.{1}.{2}", mon, da, yet);

See http://www.dotnetperls.com/console-writeline for more details.

share|improve this answer

Give this a go:

string format = "{0} / {1} / {2} {3}";
string date = string.Format(format,mon.ToString(),da.ToString(),yer.ToString();
Console.WriteLine(date);

In fact, there's probably a way to format it automatically without even doing it yourself.

Check out http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8kb3ddd4.aspx

share|improve this answer

Simple as:

DateTime.Now.ToString("MM.dd.yyyy");

link to MSDN on ALL formatting options for DateTime.ToString() method

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8kb3ddd4.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
This didn't work: – Erik Grosskurth Mar 14 '13 at 19:47
    
This did though: DateTime thisDate1 = DateTime.Now; Console.WriteLine("Today is " + thisDate1.ToString("MMMM dd, yyyy") + "."); – Erik Grosskurth Mar 14 '13 at 19:48

You could theoretically do the entire thing as simply:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq; 
using System.Text;

namespace consoleHelloWorld {
class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
       Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("MM.dd.yyyy"));
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's great but I wanted to break up the date and get the numbers individually first then reassemble them but you are absolutely right – Erik Grosskurth Mar 14 '13 at 20:13
 DateTime dateTime = dateTime.Today.ToString("MM.dd.yyyy");

 Console.Write(dateTime);
share|improve this answer

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