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Does anyone know of any security frameworks for .NET?

By security framework, I am referring to a framework consisting of a set of libraries and APIs containing code which can be used to improve the security of the application being developed overall.

So far, I have only identified Spring.NET. I have found other frameworks for .NET such as Castle MonoRail, however it is not exactly directed towards solving security issues.

EDIT:

To give you an example, a Java programmer can make use of the following security frameworks:

  1. Apache Shiro (Java)
  2. JAAS (Java)
  3. JGuard (Java)
  4. JSecurity (Java)
  5. PicketBox (Java)
  6. Spring Security (Java)
share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I don't know those frameworks but from a quick glance at Apache Shiro and Spring Security I get that you are looking for something that will do cryptography, session management, authentication and authorization. Unfortunately I don't know any frameworks that will do that for you except what's built into .NET by default.

Cryptography is provided by the System.Security.Cryptography namespace.

Authentication and authorization are provided by default by ASP.Net, as Windows, Forms or password authentication. See for example the ASP.NET authentication and authorization article on CodeProject.

Session management is also built into ASP.Net. For example, see ASP.NET State Management Overview on MSDN.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I have search a lot on the internet, however I can't seem to find any security frameworks built specifically for .NET. It seems that the .NET framework provides all these functions on its own. – Matthew Mar 14 '13 at 20:15

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