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I need some help in finding the general idea for an algorithm to solve the following problem. The problem has been given to me in an assignment. It looks like it should be solvable through a greedy method, but I can't figure out a simple solution. Here's the problem description:

You are given a sequence of N numbers a_1 ... a_n such that 0 = a_1 < a_2 < ... < a_n. You must eliminate at most M of these numbers such that the minimum difference a_i+1 - a_i between any two consecutive numbers is maximized.

You may not eliminate the first and last elements, a_0 and a_n. Also you must eliminate as few numbers as possible: if eliminating M - 1 you get the shortest distance to be D and eliminating M you still have the same minimum difference, you must not eliminate this last number.

I'm not asking for a complete solution to this problem. Only a few guidelines as to how the algorithm might look.

Edit: Some test samples. Keep in mind that there may be multiple valid solutions.

Remove at most 7 from:
0 3 7 10 15 18 26 31 38 44 53 60 61 73 76 80 81 88 93 100

Solution:
0 7 15 26 31 38 44 53 60 73 80 88 93 100
Remove at most 8 from:
0 3 7 10 15 26 38 44 53 61 76 80 88 93 100

Solution:
0 15 38 53 76 88 100
share|improve this question
    
On reflection, ElKamina's answer is not only right but very similar to mine! My earlier comment criticising it was wrong; I've now deleted it. – j_random_hacker Mar 18 '13 at 15:56
up vote 5 down vote accepted

[EDIT: I originally claimed that ElKamina's answer was wrong, but I've now convinced myself that not only is it correct, it's virtually the same as my (later) answer :-P Still a bit terse for my taste though!]

Here's an exact O(NM^2)-time, O(NM)-space dynamic programming algorithm that gets the right answer on all the OP's examples in milliseconds. The basic ideas are that:

  1. Whenever we impose the constraint that a particular number should not be deleted, it forms a "fence" between two subproblems in such a way that solving each subproblem optimally guarantees an optimal solution to the overall problem with that constraint in place, and
  2. Every optimal solution must begin with a non-deleted number, followed by some number of consecutive deleted numbers, followed by a non-deleted number, followed by an optimal solution to the remainder of the problem that begins at the second non-deleted number and uses an appropriately reduced M.

In the following, x[i] means the ith number in the list, with indexing starting from 0.

The recursion

Let f(i, j) be the optimal (largest minimum) interval size obtainable from the suffix of the number list starting at position 0 <= i < N by keeping this (i.e. the ith) number and deleting exactly j of the later (not necessarily consecutive) numbers. The following recursion shows how this can be computed:

f(i, j) = max(g(i, j, d)) over all 0 <= d <= min(j, N-i-2)
g(i, j, d) = min(x[i+d+1] - x[i], f(i+d+1, j-d))

The min(j, N-i-2) is there instead of just plain j to prevent deletions "past the end". The only base cases we need are:

f(N-1, 0) = infinity (this has the effect of making min(f(N-1), 0), z) = z)
f(N-1, j > 0) = 0 (this case only arises if M > N - 2)

How it works

In more detail, to calculate f(i, j), what we do is loop over all possible numbers (including zero) of consecutive deletions starting at position i+1, in each case calculating the minimum of (a) the interval formed by this block of deletions and (b) the optimal solution to the subproblem beginning on the first undeleted number to the right of this block. It's important to specify that the first number in a block (x[i]) is not deleted, so that the previous (parent) subproblem's interval is always "capped". This is a tricky part that took me a while to figure out.

Making it fast

If you code up the plain recursion above it will work, but it will take time exponential in M and N. By memoising f(), we guarantee that its body will be run at most N * M times (once per distinct parameter combination). Each time the function runs it performs O(M) work scanning through increasingly long blocks of deletions, for O(NM^2) time overall.

You cannot create a larger gap by using fewer deletions, so the overall largest minimum interval size can be found by looking through the M+1 results f(0, M), f(0, M-1), ..., f(0, 0) for the first number that is smaller than a previous number: that previous number is the answer, and the second argument to f() is the minimum number of deletions required. To find an optimal solution (i.e. a list of the particular numbers deleted), you can record decisions made in a separate predecessor array, so that p[i, j] gives the value of d (which can be turned into the previous values of i and j) that led to the the optimal solution for f(i, j). (Perhaps "predecessor" is confusing here: it refers to the subproblems that are solved before the current subproblem, although these subproblems appear "after" (to the right of) the suffix representing the current subproblem.) These links can then be followed to recover the delete/don't-delete decisions made.

Working C++ code

http://ideone.com/PKfhDv

Addendum: Early missteps

With a tricky problem like this, it can be helpful to look at wrong approaches and see exactly where they went wrong... :-/ I thought I'd solved the problem, but I hadn't noticed the requirement to return a solution that uses as few deletions as possible, and my initial attempts to fix this didn't work.

At first I tried defining f(i, j) to be the optimal (largest minimum) interval size obtainable from the suffix of the number list starting at position 0 <= i < N by keeping this (i.e. the ith) number and deleting anywhere from 0 up to j of the later (not necessarily consecutive) numbers. But this caused a subtle problem: it's not necessarily the case that you can assemble an optimal solution to this from optimal solutions to subproblems. I initially thought this could be fixed by changing the function to return an (interval size, minimum number of deletions needed to achieve that interval size) pair instead of just an interval size, and having it break ties between actions that share the maximum minimum interval size by always choosing the action that minimises the number of deletions. But this is not true in general, because the optimal solution to the subproblem (i.e. to some suffix of the number list) will spend deletions making the minimum interval size in that region as large as possible, even if these deletions turn out to be wasted because the prefix of the full solution will force the overall minimum to be lower anyway. Here's a counterexample using an f() that returns (interval size, minimum number of deletions needed to achieve that size) pairs:

Problem: M = 1, X = [10 15 50 55].

f(2, 0) = (5, 0) (leaving [50 55])
f(1, 1) = (40, 1) (delete 50 to leave [15 55]); *locally* this appears better
          than not deleting anything, which would leave [15 50 55] and yield
          a min-gap of 5, even though the latter would be a better choice for
          the overall problem)
f(0, 1) = max(min(5, f(1, 1)), min(40, f(2, 0))
        = max(min(5, 40), min(40, 5))
        = (5, 1) (leaving either [10 15 55] or [10 50 55])

I haven't shown the working for the second element of the pair returned by f(0, 1) because it's hard to express concisely, but obviously it will be 1 because both alternatives tried need 1 deletion.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow. Very well written, and excellent sample code. I would vote for yours to be the accepted answer, but can't delete mine now that its been accepted. – Scott Mermelstein Mar 18 '13 at 16:06
    
@ScottMermelstein: Thanks :) – j_random_hacker Mar 18 '13 at 16:20
    
nice. It might take me quite a while to understand, though. – גלעד ברקן Mar 18 '13 at 20:43

Use dynamic programming.

Clue X(i,j) contains minimum distance with first i elements and among them j selected (i.e. not deleted).

This will give you exact solution. Complexity = O(MN^2), because for each i value there are only M valid values of j, and each call to the function needs to do O(M) work.

Let elements be A1,A2,...,An

The formula for update is:

X(i+1,j+1) = Max( Min(A(i+1)-Ak, Xkj) for k<=i)

[Edited by j_random_hacker to add in info from the comments]

share|improve this answer
1  
I know OP was only looking for some direction, but could you please elaborate? I'd like to know more about this solution. – AndyG Mar 14 '13 at 23:03
    
@SauceMaster I have added the actual update to the answer. Let me know if you need more help. Essentially if you have solved the problem for all substrings 0:1, 0:2,...,0:i you can reuse that information to calculate the solution for 0:(i+1) – ElKamina Mar 15 '13 at 15:38
    
If I understand correctly, you are implicitly assuming that the partial solutions measured by X(i, j) never have the last (ith) element deleted. This means you can't ever generate solutions having multiple adjacent numbers deleted. It would help to know all the constraints you intend X(i, j) to reflect -- I assume that neither the first nor the last (ith) element is allowed to be deleted? Also by "selected" you mean "deleted", right? – j_random_hacker Mar 16 '13 at 11:18
    
@j_random_hacker Yes. Last element is always selected (that should not make the solution suboptimal though. I am using "selected", but you might easily make it deleted. – ElKamina Mar 18 '13 at 14:45
1  
@j_random_hacker Since you already have an answer which is a near duplicate I don't think my answer is useful anyways. I still think the answer is kind of complete (On SO I only provide directions, not exact answers most of the time). Anyways, I am glad I could convince you that my answer is valid. Have a good day! – ElKamina Mar 18 '13 at 17:23

I think I got the solution. It works on the two sample sets, at least. It doesn't necessarily return the same set as the answer, but the set it returns has the same minimum value. It's iterative and greedy, too, which is nice, and there are tons of ways to optimize it. Looks like it's MLog(N).

The thing that's important is to realize that the numbers don't matter - only the differences between them does. When you "remove a number", you're actually just combining two neighboring differences. My algorithm will focus on the differences then. It's a simple matter to go back to which items caused those differences and delete as you go.

Algorithm

  1. Create an ordered list / array of the differences between each number.
  2. Find the lowest difference x. If the count of x > the remaining M, stop. You're already at your best case.
  3. For each value of x starting at the leftmost, combine that difference with whichever neighbor is lower (and remove that x). If the neighbors have equal values, your decision is arbitrary. If just one neighbor has a value of x, combine with the other neighbor. (If you have no choice, e.g. [1, 1, ...], then combine with the matching X, but avoid it if you can.)
  4. Go back to step 2 until you run out of M.

Notes on algorithm

Step 3 has a point that I labelled as an arbitrary decision. It probably shouldn't be, but you're getting into edgey enough cases that it's a question of how much complexity you want to add. This arbitrariness is what allows there to be multiple different correct answers. If you see two neighbors that have the same value, at this point, I say arbitrarily choose one. Ideally, you should probably check the pair of neighbors that are 2 away, then 3, etc, and favor the lower one. I'm not sure what to do if you hit an edge while expanding. Ultimately, to do this part perfectly, you may need to recursively call this function and see which evaluates to better.

Walking through the sample data

Second one first:

Remove at most 8 from: 0 3 7 10 15 26 38 44 53 61 76 80 88 93 100

[3, 4, 3, 5, 11, 12, 6, 9, 8, 15, 4, 8, 5, 7] M = 8

Remove the 3's. Removals on edges can only add in one direction:

[7, 3, 5, 11, 12, 6, 9, 8, 15, 4, 8, 5, 7] M = 7

[7, 8, 11, 12, 6, 9, 8, 15, 4, 8, 5, 7] M = 6

Next, remove the 4: [7, 8, 11, 12, 6, 9, 8, 15, 12, 5, 7] M = 5

Next, remove the 5: [7, 8, 11, 12, 6, 9, 8, 15, 12, 12] M = 4

Next, remove the 6: [7, 8, 11, 12, 15, 8, 15, 12, 12] M = 3

Next, remove the 7: [15, 11, 12, 15, 8, 15, 12, 12] M = 2

Next, remove the 8: [15, 11, 12, 15, 23, 12, 12] M = 1 // note, arbitrary decision on direction of adding

Finally, remove the 11: [15, 23, 15, 23, 12, 12]

Note that in the answer, the lowest difference is 12.

First one last

Remove at most 7 from: 0 3 7 10 15 18 26 31 38 44 53 60 61 73 76 80 81 88 93 100

[3, 4, 3, 5, 3, 8, 5, 7, 6, 9, 7, 1, 12, 3, 4, 1, 7, 5, 7] M = 7

Remove the 1's:

[3, 4, 3, 5, 3, 8, 5, 7, 6, 9, 8, 12, 3, 4, 1, 7, 5, 7] M = 6

[3, 4, 3, 5, 3, 8, 5, 7, 6, 9, 8, 12, 3, 5, 7, 5, 7] M = 5

There are 4 3's left, so we can remove them:

[7, 3, 5, 3, 8, 5, 7, 6, 9, 8, 12, 3, 5, 7, 5, 7] M = 4

[7, 8, 3, 8, 5, 7, 6, 9, 8, 12, 3, 5, 7, 5, 7] M = 3

[7, 8, 11, 5, 7, 6, 9, 8, 12, 3, 5, 7, 5, 7] M = 2 // Note arbitrary adding to the right

[7, 8, 11, 5, 7, 6, 9, 8, 12, 8, 5, 7, 5, 7] M = 1

We would remove the 5's next, but are only allowed to remove 1, and have 3, so we stop here. Our lowest difference is 5, matching the solution.

Note: Edited from the idea of combining same X values to avoiding doing so, for the 1, 29, 30, 31, 59 case presented by SauceMaster.

share|improve this answer
    
nice answer, it helped me understand how my own algorithm was failing – גלעד ברקן Mar 16 '13 at 21:08
2  
Even when "arbitrary" choices don't arise, this algorithm can be wrong: e.g. it fails on the sequence 0 6 11 13 22 with M=2. As differences these are 6 5 2 9, so your algorithm would first combine 5 and 2 to produce 6 7 9, then combine 6 and 7 to produce 13 9. But it would be better to combine 2 and 9 first to get 6 5 11, then combine 6 and 5 to get 11 11. – j_random_hacker Mar 18 '13 at 14:37
    
Secondarily, the complexity cannot be O(Mlog N) -- there must be at least a factor of N in there because you have to read all N numbers! – j_random_hacker Mar 18 '13 at 14:38
    
Well, I can't disagree with the test case you provided, but am out of ideas as to what will make it better. Maybe @pulagroasa can post his algorithm, since he found one he's happy with. – Scott Mermelstein Mar 18 '13 at 14:47
    
It turns out that I was wrong to complain about ElKamina's DP algorithm -- it's (a) basically right and (b) basically the same as mine but with the "direction" reversed and counting non-deleted numbers instead of deleted. (It's just slower than originally advertised, and cryptic!) They'll both find the right answer every time. PS: If you write "@j_random_hacker" in a comment I'll be notified, otherwise not. – j_random_hacker Mar 18 '13 at 15:44

I was hoping not to use an all-combinations approach but after a number of tries, it seemed the only way to match my results to j_random_hacker's. (Some of the comments below relate to earlier versions of this answer.) I am impressed by how concisely j_random_hacker/ElKamina's algorithm is expressed in Haskell ('jrhMaxDiff'). His function, 'compareAllCombos', looks for differences in the results of our two methods:

*Main> compareAllCombos 7 4 4
Nothing


The algorithm:

1. Group the differences: [0, 6, 11, 13, 22] => [[6],[5],[2],[9]]

2. While enough removals remain to increase the minimum difference, extend the 
   minimum difference to join adjacent groups in all possible ways:

   [[6],[5],[2],[9]] => [[6],[5,2],[9]] and [[6],[5],[2,9]]...etc.

   Choose the highest minimum difference and lowest number of removals.


Haskell code:

import Data.List (minimumBy, maximumBy, groupBy, find)
import Data.Maybe (fromJust)

extendr ind xs = 
  let splitxs = splitAt ind xs
      (y:ys) = snd splitxs
      left = snd y
      right = snd (head ys)
  in fst splitxs ++ [(sum (left ++ right), left ++ right)] ++ tail ys

extendl ind xs = 
  let splitxs = splitAt ind xs
      (y:ys) = snd splitxs
      right = snd y
      left = snd (last $ fst splitxs)
  in init (fst splitxs) ++ [(sum (left ++ right), left ++ right)] ++ tail (snd splitxs)

extend' m xs =
  let results = map (\x -> (fst . minimumBy (\a b -> compare (fst a) (fst b)) $ x, x)) (solve xs)
      maxMinDiff = fst . maximumBy (\a b -> compare (fst a) (fst b)) $ results
      resultsFiltered = filter ((==maxMinDiff) . fst) results
  in minimumBy (\a b -> compare (sum (map (\x -> length (snd x) - 1) (snd a))) (sum (map (\x -> length (snd x) - 1) (snd b)))) resultsFiltered
   where 
     solve ys = 
       let removalCount = sum (map (\x -> length (snd x) - 1) ys)
           lowestElem = minimumBy (\a b -> compare (fst a) (fst b)) ys
           lowestSum = fst lowestElem
           lowestSumGrouped = 
             map (\x -> if (fst . head $ x) == 0 
                           then length x 
                           else if null (drop 1 x) 
                                   then 1 
                                   else if odd (length x)
                                           then div (length x + 1) 2
                                           else div (length x) 2)
             $ filter ((==lowestSum) . fst . head) (groupBy (\a b -> (fst a) == (fst b)) ys)
           nextIndices = map snd . filter ((==lowestSum) . fst . fst) $ zip ys [0..]
           lastInd = length ys - 1
       in if sum lowestSumGrouped > m - removalCount || null (drop 1 ys)
             then [ys]
             else do
               nextInd <- nextIndices          
               if nextInd == 0
                  then solve (extendl (nextInd + 1) ys)
                  else if nextInd == lastInd
                          then solve (extendr (nextInd - 1) ys)
                          else do 
                            a <- [extendl nextInd ys, extendr nextInd ys]
                            solve a

pureMaxDiff m xs = 
  let differences = map (:[]) $ tail $ zipWith (-) xs ([0] ++ init xs)
      differencesSummed = zip (map sum differences) differences
      result = extend' m differencesSummed
      lowestSum = fst result
      removalCount = sum (map (\x -> length (snd x) - 1) (snd result))
  in if null (filter ((/=0) . fst) differencesSummed)
        then (0,0)
        else (removalCount, lowestSum)

-- __j_random_hacker's stuff begins here

-- My algorithm from http://stackoverflow.com/a/15478409/47984.
-- Oddly it seems to be much faster when I *don't* try to use memoisation!
-- (I don't really understand how memoisation in Haskell works yet...)
jrhMaxDiff m xs = fst $ fromJust $ find (\(x, y) -> snd x > snd y) resultPairsDesc
  where
    inf = 1000000
    n = length xs
    f i j =
      if i == n - 1
         then if j == 0
                 then inf
                 else 0
         else maximum [g i j d | d <- [0 .. min j (n - i - 2)]]
    g i j d = min ((xs !! (i + d + 1)) - (xs !! i)) (f (i + d + 1) (j - d))
    resultsDesc = map (\i -> (i, f 0 i)) $ reverse [0 .. m]
    resultPairsDesc = zip resultsDesc (concat [(tail resultsDesc), [(-1, -1)]])

-- All following code is for looking for different results between my and groovy's algorithms.
-- Generate a list of all length-n lists containing numbers in the range 0 - d.
upto 0 _ = [[]]
upto n d = concat $ map (\x -> (map (\y -> (x : y)) (upto (n - 1) d))) [0 .. d]

-- Generate a list of all length-maxN or shorter lists containing numbers in the range 0 - maxD.
generateAllDiffCombos 1 maxD = [[x] | x <- [0 .. maxD]]
generateAllDiffCombos maxN maxD =
  (generateAllDiffCombos (maxN - 1) maxD) ++ (upto maxN maxD)

diffsToNums xs = scanl (+) 0 xs

generateAllCombos maxN maxD = map diffsToNums $ generateAllDiffCombos maxN maxD

-- generateAllCombos causes pureMaxDiff to produce an error with (1, [0, 0]) and (1, [0, 0, 0]) among others,
-- so filter these out to look for more "interesting" differences.
--generateMostCombos maxN maxD = filter (\x -> length x /= 2) $ generateAllCombos maxN maxD
generateMostCombos maxN maxD = filter (\x -> length x > 4) $ generateAllCombos maxN maxD

-- Try running both algorithms on every list of length up to maxN having gaps of
-- size up to maxD, allowing up to maxDel deletions (this is the M parameter).
compareAllCombos maxN maxD maxDel =
  find (\(x, maxDel, jrh, grv) -> jrh /= grv) $ map (\x -> (x, maxDel, jrhMaxDiff maxDel x, pureMaxDiff maxDel x)) $ generateMostCombos maxN maxD
--  show $ map (\x -> (x, jrhMaxDiff maxDel x, pureMaxDiff maxDel x)) $ generateMostCombos maxN maxD
share|improve this answer
    
Looks nice to me. But I've been proven wrong so often, I'm sure the counter-example experts will have some way of showing otherwise. – Scott Mermelstein Mar 22 '13 at 4:10
    
@ScottMermelstein thanks for looking, look forward to the counter-examples, have faith – גלעד ברקן Mar 22 '13 at 4:41
    
At long last I've had a crack at this -- I've translated my algo to Haskell and added some automated testing stuff: ideone.com/sTmqUO. First, your maxDiff seems to give "Exception: Prelude.head: empty list" on X=[0, 0] or X=[0, 0, 0] for M=1. Filtering the test data down a bit, I got compareAllCombos 5 2 2 to produce Just ([0,0,0,0,0],(0,0),(1,0)) -- i.e. your algo incorrectly reports that M=1, X=[0, 0, 0, 0, 0] requires 1 deletion. Hope the code is useful! – j_random_hacker Mar 29 '13 at 10:32
    
@j_random_hacker thanks so much for finding the bugs and letting me know. I was getting a correct zero deletions for M=1, X=[0, 0, 0, 0, 0], but it's not important...the bug was that the routine kept running even when there were only two numbers (one difference) left, as well as a fake calculation of total removals. I think I fixed those. Any counter-examples now? – גלעד ברקן Mar 29 '13 at 12:55
    
I'm afraid I can't spend more time on this, but you should be able to check for counterexamples yourself with my compareAllCombos function. It will take a long time if you increase any of the parameters too much though! – j_random_hacker Mar 29 '13 at 12:58

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