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I have a need to look at the data in a data frame in a different way. Here is the problem..

I have a data frame as follows

Person  Item  BuyOrSell
1        a    B
1        b    S
1        a    S
2        d    B
3        a    S
3        e    S

One of the requirements I have is to see the data as follows. Show the sum of all transactions made by the Person on individual items broken by the transaction type (B or S)

Person    aB   aS   bB   bS   dB   dS   eB   eS
1          1    1    0    1    0    0   0     0
2          0    0    0    0    1    0   0     0
3          1    0    0    0    0    0   0     1

So i created a new column and appended the values of both the Item and BuyOrSell.

df$newcol<-paste(Item,"-",BuyOrSell,sep="")
table(Person,newcol) 

and was able to achieve the above results.

The last transformation requirement which was a tough nut to crack was as follows....

  aB   aS   bB   bS   dB   dS   eB   eS
aB 1    1    0    1    0   0     0   0
aS 1    2    0    1    0   0     0   1
bB 0    0    0    0    0   0     0   0
bS 1    1    0    0    0   0     0   0
dB 0    0    0    0    1   0     0   0
dS 0    0    0    0    0   0     0   0
eB 0    0    0    0    0   0     0   0
eS 0    1    0    0    0   0     0   1

where the above table had to be filled in with the number of people who made a particular transaction also made a transaction on another item.

I tried table(newcol,newcol) but it generated counts only for aB-aB,aS-aS,bB-bB,..... and 0s for all other combinations.

Any ideas on what package or command will let me crack this nut ?

share|improve this question
3  
I think you should accept the answer to your previous question first: stackoverflow.com/questions/15417698/data-transformations-in-r – Arun Mar 14 '13 at 20:55
    
just did. Thanks Arun ! – user2171177 Mar 14 '13 at 21:01
    
could you explain your criteria to get the final table a bit more detailed please? I'm having a hard time understanding "where the above table had to be... on another item" – Arun Mar 14 '13 at 22:16
    
Arun, the table shows the counts of all people who bought one particular item from the row also bought an item form the column. For example, if user A bought Item A and Item B, then a_Bb_B =1, if user B also bought the same combination of items, then a_Bb_B should be incremented by 1 and the result would be a_B*b_B=2 – user2171177 Mar 14 '13 at 22:26
    
and if the same user bought the same combination of items twice, i will still add it to the count. – user2171177 Mar 14 '13 at 22:40
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Isn't the final result just:

# Following Ricardo's solution for casting, but using `acast` instead
A <- acast(Person~Item+BuyOrSell,data=df,fun.aggregate=length,drop=FALSE)

# A' * A
> t(A) %*% A
#     a_B a_S b_B b_S d_B d_S e_B e_S
# a_B   1   1   0   1   0   0   0   0
# a_S   1   2   0   1   0   0   0   1
# b_B   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
# b_S   1   1   0   1   0   0   0   0
# d_B   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0
# d_S   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
# e_B   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
# e_S   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   1
share|improve this answer
    
Looks right to me. Quite elegant! – Blue Magister Mar 14 '13 at 23:59
    
this was a brilliant answer. wonderful..thanks. – user2171177 Mar 15 '13 at 1:31

I think there is a better way, but here's a method using the package reshape2.

require(reshape2)
#reshapes data so each item and buy/sell event interaction occurs once
df2 <- dcast(Person~Item+BuyOrSell,data=df,fun.aggregate=length,drop=FALSE)
df2
  # Person a_B a_S b_B b_S d_B d_S e_B e_S
# 1      1   1   1   0   1   0   0   0   0
# 2      2   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0
# 3      3   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   1

#reshapes data so every row is an interaction by person
df3 <- melt(df2,id.vars="Person")
head(df3)
     # Person variable value
# 1       1      a_B     1
# 2       2      a_B     0
# 3       3      a_B     0
# 4       1      a_S     1
# 5       2      a_S     0
# 6       3      a_S     1

#removes empty rows where no action occurred
#removes value column
df4 <- with(df3,
  data.frame(Person=rep.int(Person,value),variable=rep.int(variable,value))
#performs a self-merge: now each row is 
#every combination of two actions that one person has done
df5 <- merge(df4,df4,by="Person")
head(df5)
  # Person variable.x variable.y
# 1      1        a_B        a_B
# 2      1        a_B        a_S
# 3      1        a_B        b_S
# 4      1        a_S        a_B
# 5      1        a_S        a_S
# 6      1        a_S        b_S

#tabulates variable interactions
with(df5,table(variable.x,variable.y))
share|improve this answer
    
could you please explain your solution ? especially the df4 – user2171177 Mar 14 '13 at 21:30
    
I changed df4 originally because I thought you would count person 1 twice if they bought item A twice, but on re-reading the question I think you just want number of people. I've changed it back now. – Blue Magister Mar 14 '13 at 22:32
    
your initial solution was perfect. i would count person 1 twice. i have posted my answer below..i am stumped with what i am doing differently based on your solution. Please comment on my post below. – user2171177 Mar 14 '13 at 22:38

Blue Magister,your solution works perfectly and i analyzed each an every step that you performed.

The output of df4 was follows:

 Person variable
1      1      a_B
2      1      a_S
3      3      a_S
4      1      b_S
5      2      d_B
6      3      e_S

The output of with(df5,table(variable.x,variable.y)) was

variable.y
variable.x a_B a_S b_B b_S d_B d_S e_B e_S
       a_B   1   1   0   1   0   0   0   0
       a_S   1   2   0   1   0   0   0   1
       b_B   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
       b_S   1   1   0   1   0   0   0   0
       d_B   0   0   0   0   1   0   0   0
       d_S   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
       e_B   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0
       e_S   0   1   0   0   0   0   0   1

which is exactly what i want.

When i look at the output of d4 it was almost similar to the my newcol solution ( using paste )

> df
  Person newcol
1      1    a-B
2      1    b-S
3      1    a-S
4      2    d-B
5      3    a-S
6      3    e-S

The only difference here is the ordering of the rows when compared to your df4.

So, i ended up running this command

dfx <- merge(df,df,by="Person")
 with(dfx,table(newcol.x,newcol.y)) 

and it generated the following...

    newcol.y
newcol.x a-B a-S b-S d-B e-S
     a-B   1   1   1   0   0
     a-S   1   2   1   0   1
     b-S   1   1   1   0   0
     d-B   0   0   0   1   0
     e-S   0   1   0   0   1

The above output ignored few rows and columns. What am i doing different from you ?

share|improve this answer
    
You should move this text to a separate question instead of asking through an 'answer'. Link back to your previous questions as well so people understand what you're asking. – Blue Magister Mar 14 '13 at 22:49
1  
Essentially the difference stems from levels(df4$variable) and your levels(df$newcol). – Blue Magister Mar 14 '13 at 22:50
    
brilliant ! thanks. – user2171177 Mar 15 '13 at 1:29

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