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I'd like to use this question as a way to debate an algorithm for synchronization over network of 2 or more microcontrollers.

I started thinking of the problem this afternoon, where I'd have 2 different microcontrollers exchange data then synchronize execution to start doing the work at the same time and finishing at approximately the same time. This is a way to guarantee that the code that you are running is correct and possibly there are no errors in the memory (the chance of having the exact same error on both microcontrollers is extremely low as you may imagine).

I thought about just sending a message with microcontroller 1's timestamp, then the second microcontroller would receive it and compare it with its own timestamp and then resend it to microcontroller1.

At that point they would both start exectuing the same code and they would synchronize at the end, where they would exchange each other'a results and then they'd come to the conclusion if there is something wrong, or everything's working alright.

I thought this would be a "decent" way to achieve synchronization of execution between both microcontrollers, but I can't get out of my head that there might be a better and smarter way of doing this.

This "might" work alright with 2 microcontrollers, but what about when I want to do it with more microcontrollers? What if I want to implement a 5 core system (5 arm9 cores for example) in the way I've explained before. I don't see this working for several microcontrollers. Not even if I wanted to implement a 5 core system in which all microcontrollers would do different work (I think synchronization must be the best possible in all cases .... I really don't know I've never needed more than one core, but I'll need to do it from now on)

EDIT:

I'd like to use this question as a way to understand algorithms for synchronization over network, or on the same board, of 2 or more microcontrollers.

I started thinking of the problem this afternoon, where I'd have 2 different microcontrollers exchange data then synchronize execution to start doing the work at the same time and finishing at approximately the same time. This is a way to guarantee that the code that you are running is correct and possibly there are no errors in the memory (the chance of having the exact same error on both microcontrollers is extremely low as you may imagine).

I thought about just sending a message with microcontroller 1's timestamp, then the second microcontroller would receive it and compare it with its own timestamp and then resend it to microcontroller1.

At that point they would both start exectuing the same code and they would synchronize at the end, where they would exchange each other'a results and then they'd come to the conclusion if there is something wrong, or everything's working alright.

I thought this would be a "decent" way to achieve synchronization of execution between both microcontrollers, but I can't get out of my head that there might be a better and smarter way of doing this.

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To the title: it's called a "wire", going from the one CLK pin to the other. –  user529758 Mar 14 '13 at 20:56
    
Not a great fit for this site (see stackoverflow.com/faq#dontask) Try chat or similar... –  Ross Mar 14 '13 at 21:05
    
@H2CO3 I really don't thing that's a good idea. Specially if you want to synchronize over a network. –  morcillo Mar 14 '13 at 21:17
    
@Ross I think it should be here because I'm talking about an algorithm to synchronize, for any given purpouse. I'm not really talking about hardware and how to connect them, I just gave a few examples of how to connect them so that people can relate better to what I'm trying to say. I wanted to talk algorithm, but if I'm mistaken I'll take it out of here. Just let me read the link you passed me –  morcillo Mar 14 '13 at 21:19
    
@Ross Yep .. you're right. Let me change the scope of my question. Because what I wrote is one thing, but what I want is another thing. Thank you for the heads up –  morcillo Mar 14 '13 at 21:21
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are certainly systems around where two or more processors are performing the same task and the results are compared. I know of autmatic train controls that have two systems that should produce the same result, and if one of the system DOESN'T produce the same result, the emergency brake is "pulled" and the train stops until the driver pushes the "I notice the computer isn't working right" button. The two systems have software written by two different sets of developers, who are not sharing any information on how they go about implementing their solution so as to avoid "common errors because we both thought THIS should be solved this way".

Airplane electronic usually uses an uneven number and "majority voting" to select between multiple answers from different systems - it's a bad idea to just "stop" in an ariplane. Again, systems are using different software and often also different suppliers of for example processors and languages - so one system is written in C or C++, another in Java and the third one in Pascal or ADA [as an example] - to reduce the chances of a processor, language or compiler bug causing EVERY thing in the system from going "wrong".

From a previous job working with x86, I have looked into this in a fair bit of detail for a customer who wanted to have a "backup processor running in lock-step", and they had to use a modified compiler that added I/O instructions at decision points in the code [branches, calls, returns, etc] and then external hardware to ensure that the processors were actually in sync]. So, modern processors, including such ARM have enough "clever stuff" that is fairly "unpredictable" inside the processor that it's almost impossible to make two processors run in exact lock-step with each other. Sure you can get something that "performs the same task in the same amount of time", as long as you don't measure time TOO precisely.

Superscalar execution units, asynchronous interrupts, asynchronous(ish) memory controllers, caches, content of caches, all conspire to make one processor run just a little faster or slower than the other.

So, there is a limit to how precisely you can make the systems "sync".

Network Time Protocol (NTP) does have some pretty clever algorithms for setting/syncing the time between multiple systems, which allows several systems to have the same idea of "time". But bear in mind that again, there is a limit to "sameness". It is likely several microseconds.

So, whether you can "start at the same time" depends on what you mean by "same time". Is microseconds or milliseconds OK? If so, almost certainly possible. If you mean clock-cycles, then probably not.

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Yeah ... I thought that would be the case, so I was thinking of using a microsecond delay. Maybe something like this ... both microprocessor send their timestamps to each other and then execute the code (the one that finishes first waits up to 2us before generating a time out) and then I'd think os something more elaborate. Thank you for your help. –  morcillo Mar 15 '13 at 13:57
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There are a number of ways to do this, depending on how custom you'd want to make the system, and how precise you need it to run.

You're on the right track with the timestamps being sent back and forth though. The "standard" way of doing local synchronization like this is the Precision Time Protocol (PTP / IEEE 1588), which works down to microsecond precision, depending on the implementation (opposed to the Network Time Protocol, NTP, which is better suited for long-distance synchronization, and can typically not achieve synchronization better than in the millisecond-range).

If you have a Linux system with Ethernet or similar running on your microcontrollers, you could thus have a look at PTPD. Or, if you want to implement something yourself, have a look at the PTP (and probably also the NTP) algorithm(s) and be inspired.

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