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I'm wondering how to best handle this async await chain where multiple CPU bound methods need to be called sequentially after the async chain.

I've typed up a small example below.

I'm just trying to find out what the best performing / least side effecting pattern is. I want to make sure I'm not defeating the async benefits. My Filter methods do not access anything that is async and awaitable so to make them async means I would have to return Task.Run(() => Filter1(criterion)) in the calling method or something like await Task.Run(() => { return events; }); in the filter methods themselves. Which way to go for a best practice is the question. This is where most discussions stop so a full example and recommendation would be nice.

Are there any 4.5 async await gurus out there who can give good advice?

namespace test
{
    using System.Net;
    using System.Net.Http;
    using System.Threading.Tasks;
    using System.Web.Http;

    public class sampleController : ApiController
    {
        private Service _service;

        public sampleController()
        {
            _service = new Service();
        }

        public async Task<HttpResponseMessage> SomeTask(DiagnosesSearchCriterion criterion)
        {
            return Request.CreateResponse<IEnumerable<Diagnosis>>(HttpStatusCode.OK, await _service.GetDiagnosesByGroup(criterion));
        }
    }

    public class Service
    {
        private Repository _repository;

        public Service()
        {
            _repository = new Repository();
        }
        public async Task<IEnumerable<Diagnosis>> GetDiagnosis(DiagnosesSearchCriterion criterion)
        {
            System.IO.Stream events = await _repository.GetEvents(criterion);

            // Will these block? Should they be async? They are CPU bound... 
            // how to best handle this, they need to be called sequentially in most cases.
            events = Filter1(criterion, events);
            events = Filter2(criterion, events);

            return new Diagnosis[]{};
        }

        public System.IO.Stream Filter1(DiagnosesSearchCriterion criterion, System.IO.Stream events)
        {
            // CPU bound PLINQ and Parallel filtering logic here.....

            return events;
        }

        public System.IO.Stream Filter2(DiagnosesSearchCriterion criterion, System.IO.Stream events)
        {
            // CPU bound PLINQ and Parallel filtering logic here.....
            // ....

            return events;
        }
    }

    public class Repository
    {
        public async Task<System.IO.Stream> GetEvents(DiagnosesSearchCriterion criterion)
        {
            WebClient wc = new WebClient();
            return await wc.OpenReadTaskAsync("http://www.blah.com/stuff");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Filter1 and Filter2 will block, yes. I'm not entirely sure what your question is -- could you reword it? –  Cory Nelson Mar 14 '13 at 21:21
    
Yes, you should have Filter1 and Filter2 be "async" if they are CPU bound because the code after the await will be invoked on the main thread (which will be the UI thread in Winform/WPF application) –  Peter Ritchie Mar 14 '13 at 21:26
    
Cory. I'm just trying to find out what the best performing / least side effecting pattern is. I want to make sure I'm not defeating the async benefits. My Filter methods do not access anything that is async and awaitable so to make them async means I would have to return Task.Run(() => Filter1(criterion)) in the calling method or something like await Task.Run<Stream>(() => { return events; }); in the filter methods themselves. Which way to go for a best practice is the question. This is where most discussions stop so a full example and recommendation would be nice. –  Jane Sizmur Schick Mar 14 '13 at 21:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

On the server side, your primary benefit from async is scalability - that is, the thread pool thread is freed up from handling a request if the request is just waiting for some I/O to complete.

In this case (where your methods are CPU-bound), there's no benefit from making them async. You'll still be taking up a thread pool thread (and adding a small amount of overhead) by using Task.Run. Since they should be executed sequentially, the easiest way to do this is to invoke them synchronously, just like your code is currently doing.

I think this scenario is addressed in the excellent Async in ASP.NET video. Note that this same situation on the client side would be handled differently. On the client side, your primary benefit from async is responsiveness, so it would make sense to toss CPU work into a thread pool thread (Task.Run), since that would free up the UI thread.

(As a side note, it's usually not a good idea to do parallel processing on a server, unless you're sure your user count will be quite low).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Stephen for the excellent advice which I was able to verify with the link you sent along with this one. blogs.msdn.com/b/pfxteam/archive/2010/02/08/9960003.aspx –  Jane Sizmur Schick Mar 15 '13 at 1:53

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