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So I have this button which adds a new row to the table, however my problem is that it does not listen to the .new_participant_form click event anymore after the append method has taken place.

http://jsfiddle.net/cTEFG/

Click Add New Entry then click on the Form name.

$('#add_new_participant').click(function() {


    var first_name = $('#f_name_participant').val();
    var last_name = $('#l_name_participant').val();
    var role = $('#new_participant_role option:selected').text();
    var email = $('#email_participant').val();


    $('#registered_participants').append('<tr><td><a href="#" class="new_participant_form">Participant Registration</a></td><td>'+first_name+ ' '+last_name+'</td><td>'+role+'</td><td>0% done</td></tr>');

    });

    $('.new_participant_form').click(function() {

        var $td = $(this).closest('tr').children('td');

        var part_name = $td.eq(1).text();
        alert(part_name);

    });
});

HTML

<table id="registered_participants" class="tablesorter">

<thead>
<tr> 
<th>Form</th>
<th>Name</th>
<th>Role</th>
<th>Progress </th>


</tr> 
</thead>


<tbody>
<tr> 
<td><a href="#" class="new_participant_form">Participant Registration</a></td>
<td>Smith Johnson</td>
<td>Parent</td>
<td>60% done</td>


</tr> 
</tbody>

</table>

<button id="add_new_participant"></span>Add New Entry</button> 
share|improve this question
    
The problem is that the event is only attached to the new_participant_form element that is already in the document. To make it work for elements you will add later as well, you can use event delegation, as dystroy has demonstrated, or attach the handler to each anchor before you insert it (the former is more efficient). –  Asad Mar 14 '13 at 21:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 49 down vote accepted

Use on :

$('#registered_participants').on('click', '.new_participant_form', function() {

So that the click is delegated to any element in #registered_participants having the class new_participant_form, even if it's added after you bound the event handler.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks its awesome –  Peeyush May 26 '13 at 11:09
2  
Is there any disadvantage regarding performance, if you use $(document).on('click', '.new_participant_form', function() {}); ? –  basZero Dec 19 '13 at 16:25
1  
@basZero There's one, as jQuery would then have to handle all clicks and not just the one on the #registered_participants but to be fair this slowdown is so small it's irrelevant. It's mostly better to target the right element because it's cleaner. –  Denys Séguret Dec 19 '13 at 16:28

First: You have an invalid markup:

 <button id="add_new_participant">Add New Entry</button> 
 <!-- <button id="add_new_participant"></span>Add New Entry</button>  WRONG !!! -->

Than use the .on() method to delegate the click event to future elements added to the DOM

LIVE DEMO

$('#add_new_participant').click(function() {   

    var first_name = $('#f_name_participant').val();   
    var last_name = $('#l_name_participant').val();
    var role = $('#new_participant_role option:selected').text();
    var email = $('#email_participant').val();

    $('#registered_participants').append('<tr><td><a href="#" class="new_participant_form">Participant Registration</a></td><td>'+first_name+ ' '+last_name+'</td><td>'+role+'</td><td>0% done</td></tr>');

});

$('#registered_participants').on('click', '.new_participant_form', function() {

    var $td = $(this).closest('tr').children('td');  
    var part_name = $td.eq(1).text();
    alert(part_name);

});

Read more: http://api.jquery.com/on/

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