Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been having the same issue for a while now and I can't seem to get my head around it no matter how much research. I have came up with some theories why it may be happening though.

Basically, I'm writing a simple C shell and I'm encountering an annoying error when trying to implement aliases which I am going to store in a two-dimensional array. Whenever I try to assign more than one alias to the array, it overwrites the first element.

I thought it might be down to:

  1. Memory issues when tokenizing the input again
  2. Issues with array "decay" and pointers
  3. My compiler hates me.

Here is my code:

void fillArray(char* tokens[], char* aliasArray[ALIAS_NO][TOKEN_NUM]) {
    /* Integer for the for loop */
    int i;
    /* Counter for attribute addition */
    int counter = 2;
    /* Onto the search */
    for (i = 0; i < ALIAS_NO; i++) {
        if (aliasArray[i][0] == NULL) { /* If there is a space here */
            aliasArray[i][0] = tokens[counter-1]; /* Assign the alias */
            while (tokens[counter] != NULL) { /* While there is still stuff left */
                aliasArray[i][counter-1] = tokens[counter]; /* Add it in */
                counter++; /* Increment the counter */
            }
            return;
        }
    }
    return;
}

Where ALIAS_NO and TOKEN_NUM are preprocessor directives of the value 10 and 50 respectively.

The check works to see if the entry is null when I print the status of i and I also initialise every element in the multidimensional array to NULL.

Any assistance will be greatly appreciated. I've been banging my head against the wall for far too long now.

Thanks :)

EDIT: I've also tried to use the strcpy() function. Unfortunately, this throws a segmentation fault.

EDIT: New code

 void fillArray(char* tokens[], char* aliasArray[ALIAS_NO][TOKEN_NUM]) {
/* Integer for the for loop */
int i;
/* Counter for attribute addition */
int counter = 2;
/* Buffer */
char buffer[200];
/* Onto the search */
for(i = 0; i < ALIAS_NO; i++) {
    if(aliasArray[i][0] == NULL) { /* If there is a space here */
        strcpy(buffer, tokens[counter-1]);
        aliasArray[i][0] = buffer; /* Assign the alias */
        while (tokens[counter] != NULL) { /* While there is still stuff left */
            strcpy(buffer, tokens[counter]);
            aliasArray[i][counter-1] = buffer; /* Add it in */
            counter++; /* Increment the counter */
        }
        return;
    }
}
return;
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you allocating a new string to copy into prior to doing your strcpy? –  Matthew T. Staebler Mar 14 '13 at 21:48
    
Wouldn't that affect my return values and/or assignments? Or do you mean I could copy the value of tokens[counter] into a buffer then assign aliasArray[i][counter] to that? –  NiftyClown Mar 14 '13 at 21:50
1  
That is what I mean. You are probably using the same buffers for the tokens each time and filling them with different values. Since you are storing a pointer to those buffers in aliasArray, aliasArray will always reflect the most recent values placed into those buffers. –  Matthew T. Staebler Mar 14 '13 at 21:53
    
I'll give that a shot then! :) Now that I think about it, that makes a lot more sense and is a lot more sensible to what I was doing. Thanks, I'll let you know how it goes. –  NiftyClown Mar 14 '13 at 21:56
    
I'm afraid it's still doing the same thing. The first element in the aliasArray, [0][0], is being replaced by whatever is being added past the first entry. –  NiftyClown Mar 14 '13 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
for(i = 0; i < ALIAS_NO; i++)
{
    if(aliasArray[i][0] == NULL)
    {
        aliasArray[i][0] = strdup(tokens[counter-1]);
        while (tokens[counter] != NULL)
        {
            aliasArray[i][counter-1] = strdup(tokens[counter]);
            counter++;
        }
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That is the basis of what you want. You are now responsible for the lifetime of those strings, so you need to make sure that you free them when you are done with them. –  Matthew T. Staebler Mar 14 '13 at 22:33
    
Works perfectly, thanks a lot to both of you for your assistance :) –  NiftyClown Mar 14 '13 at 22:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.