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Question

How to declare a string variable in C?

Background

In my quest to learn the basics of , I am trying to port one of my oldest programs, Bob, to C. In the program, the script asks the user for information on him or herself, and then spits out responses. Almost all of these variables use raw_input for their information - the variables are strings. But, I have found no way to declare C variables.

Code

So far, I have tried to declare the variable as of type char and int. Here is the code, switch the type at your leisure.

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    int name;
    printf("What is your name?");
    scanf("%s",&name);
    printf("Your name is %s", name );

    return 0;
}

Error Message

When I run this code, Xcode returns some weird stuff. This part of the globidty-gloop is highlighted.

0x7fff96d2b4f0:  pcmpeqb(%rdi), %xmm0

Lasty, this Yahoo Answer said that I had to use something called a character array. It was posted 5 years ago, so I assumed that there was a better way.

EDIT

I am following the tutorial at C Programming.

share|improve this question
1  
Why is this tagged python? – millimoose Mar 14 '13 at 21:39
1  
A string is a 0-terminated character array. Still. – Daniel Fischer Mar 14 '13 at 21:39
2  
Why are you using an integer for name? – mgilson Mar 14 '13 at 21:40
2  
Also, this is a C tutorial level question. I suggest following one. (The pedantic but useless answer is that C doesn't have a string type, only character arrays, and string manipulation functions that expect them to be null-terminated.) – millimoose Mar 14 '13 at 21:40
1  
There is no better way since the Yahoo answer was posted. The answer there is still the best one. – QuentinUK Mar 14 '13 at 21:42
char name[60];
scanf("%s", name);

Edit: restricted input length to 59 characters (plus terminating 0):

char name[60];
scanf("%59s", name);
share|improve this answer
3  
Surely you mean scanf("%59s", name) ? – cnicutar Mar 14 '13 at 21:40
    
@cnicutar yes, but that is a subject of buffer overflow question :) – Valeri Atamaniouk Mar 14 '13 at 21:41
1  
Well since you're dealing with a self-proclaimed beginner there's no point in teaching questionable habits from the start. – cnicutar Mar 14 '13 at 21:41
    
@ValeriAtamaniouk so... what happens if my name is over 60 characters? – xxmbabanexx Mar 14 '13 at 21:42
1  
@xxmbabanexx Undefined behavior. Most likely input will write all over the stack. – cnicutar Mar 14 '13 at 21:43

TESTED ON XCODE

You can do so:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    int i;
    char name[60]; //array, every cell contains a character

    //But here initialize your array

    printf("What is your name?\n");
    fgets(name, sizeof(name), stdin);
    printf("Your name is %s", name );

    return 0;
}

Initialize the array, is good to avoid bug

for(i=0;i<60;i++){
      name[i]='\0'; //null
}

Instead int is used for int number (1, 2, 3, ecc.); For floating point number instead you have to use float

share|improve this answer
    
What does fgets and the related arguments mean? – xxmbabanexx Mar 14 '13 at 22:16
    
'fgets' put character by character in every cell for the lenght of the array name and put after the last cell used '\0' that means null. stdin clean the stream of the input – AlessioMTX Mar 14 '13 at 22:21

In C you can not direct declare a string variable like Java and other language. you'll have to use character array or pointer for declaring strings.

char a[50];
printf("Enter your string");
gets(a);

OR

char *a;
printf("Enter your string here");
gets(a);

OR

char a[60];
scanf("%59s",a);
share|improve this answer
1  
Is better don't use gets, use fgets as I did in my answer. Why? I had several problems with a more complex problem using gets – AlessioMTX Mar 15 '13 at 18:02

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