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I sitting on it more then hour, may be because of late hour or may be i just stupid but i cant do it. I have two arrays

a[0] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[1] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[2] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[3] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];

b=['','','','',
'','','','','',
'','','','','',
'','','','','',
'','','','','',
'','','','','',
'','','','','',
'','']

As you see it is different formats of array, but each cell from array a[] refers to the his brother in array b[]

i'm trying to write a function that get the adreess of cell in array a[] like that calculate(3,2,2) and return the adress of cell in array b[]

Here is what i wrote so far...

function timecalculating(x,y,z) {
    var count =z;

    var prew=y-1;

    for (var i=k; i>-1; i--) {

        for (var j=vocabulary[i].length; j>-1; j--) {



            count+=vocabulary[i][prew].length;
        }
    }
    alert (count) ;
}

But i know it is not right.. Any suggestions??

Here is some examples: INPUT (3,1,1) which means

a[0] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[1] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[2] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[3] = [['','',''],['','HERE',''],['','','']];

So it shold count all of it down. (2+3)+(3+3+3)+(3+3+3)+(3+3+3)=32 <= this is "adress" in array b[] 2 - is z 3(first) is a[x][y].length 3(second) is a[x][y-1].length

and so on..

i want it to be universal for arrays with different lengthes)

a[0] = [['','',''],['','',''],['','','']];
a[1] = [['',''],['','','']];
a[2] = [['','',''],[''],['','']];
a[3] = [['','','']];
share|improve this question
1  
It would be helpful if you give an example of input and the expected output. – sissi_luaty Mar 14 '13 at 22:04
    
'HERE' is in wrong place. It's at [3][1][1] not [3][2][2]. – Beetroot-Beetroot Mar 14 '13 at 22:17
    
You right.. i fixed it – Ilya Libin Mar 14 '13 at 22:19
    
I am having difficulty with (2+3)+(3+3+3)+(3+3+3)+(3+3+3)=32. Where do the numbers come from? – Beetroot-Beetroot Mar 14 '13 at 22:20
    
see the updates. hope it is better now – Ilya Libin Mar 14 '13 at 22:29

I'm not sure I understand correctly but do you mean this ...

function timecalculating(x,y,z) {
    var index = 9 * x + 3 * y + z;
    return b[index];
}

Edit

OK, after seeing your edited question, I better understand it.

The generalized solution is surprisingly tricky and involves recursion.

Try this :

function countUp(arr, stopAt, progress, level) {
    //Initialize level and progress (at level 0).
    level = level || 0;
    if(level == 0) {
        if(!progress) {
            progress = [];
            for(var i=0; i<stopAt.length; i++) progress[i] = 0;
        };
        try {
            var ar = arr, val;
            for(var i=0; i<stopAt.length; i++) {
                val = ar[stopAt[i]];
                if( val == undefined || (i<stopAt.length-1 && !$.isArray(val)) ) {
                    throw('');
                }
                ar = val;
            };
        }
        catch(e) {
            return -1;//return -1 if the requested stopAt position doesn't exist.
        }
    }

    progress[level] = 0;
    var c, stop = false;
    for(var i=0, n=0; i<arr.length; i++, progress[level]++) {
        if($.isArray(arr[i])) {
            c = countUp(arr[i], stopAt, progress, level+1);
            n += c.n;
            stop = c.stop;
        }
        else {
            n += 1;
            stop = arrayCompare(stopAt, progress);
        };
        if(stop) break;
    }
    return (level>0) ? {n:n, 'stop':stop} : n-1;
}

//Utility function for comparing two arrays
function arrayCompare(arr1, arr2) {
    if(arr1.length !== arr2.length) return false;
    for(var i=0; i<arr1.length; i++) {
        if(arr1[i] !== arr2[i]) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Call the function as follows :

var index = countUp(a, [3,1,1]);

where a is an array and the second argument represents the indexes of the stop position.

If the requested stop position doesn't exist, the function returns -1.

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
No... :) It is just private solution..i want it to be universal.. for arrays like a[0] = [['','',''],['','','']['','','']]; a[1] = [['',''],['','','']]; a[2] = [['','',''],['']['','']]; a[3] = [['','','']]; – Ilya Libin Mar 14 '13 at 22:12
    
@IlyaLibin, see edited answer. – Beetroot-Beetroot Mar 15 '13 at 8:44

The general solution for converting multidimensional indices to their one-dimensional counterpart for arrays of the same size requires the size of the dimensions of each dimension of the array other than the first and depends on whether you are using row-major or column-major ordering.

I will use row-major order in my examples here as I think it's what you're looking for (converting to column-major is easy). I will explain row-major indexing using the example that follows. Consider the following array.

var array = [[0, 1, 2],
             [0, 1, 2],
             [0, 1, 2]];

In row-major order we are looking for indices of the rows as if they were organised one-after another. This is as if each row was appended into a single array [0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2]. The indices of what was the first row are just the same (0, 1 and 2). For what was the second row we must add the length of the first row, which was 3, giving us indices 3, 4, 5. This length of the first row is of course the size of the second dimension of the original array. For what was the third row we must add twice the second dimension of the original array, giving 6, 7, 8. The pattern here should be obvious, and is used in the examples below.

In general, for a 2D array c of size c[height][width] the 1D index corresponding to a 2D position c[y][x] is y * width + x.

For a three dimensional array d of size d[depth][height][width], the 1D index corresponding to position d[z][y][x] is z * (width * height) + y * width + z.

The same concept can applied to multi-dimensional arrays with varying sizes. However, it is not possible to get the answer in a single calculation as we did before because the sizes of the sub-arrays are not known. Instead, you must count the number of elements prior to the given target index. This is pretty simple, as you should see in my code below, which you can test with this demo.

/*  Sums the number of elements in each sub-array of the given array.
    Returns the resulting sum.
    array: the array to count the elements of. */
function countAllElements(array) {
    var elements = 0;

    if (Array.isArray(array)) {
        for (var i = 0; i < array.length; ++i) {
            elements += countAllElements(array[i]);
        }
    }
    else {
        ++elements;
    }

    return elements;
}


/*  Sums the number of elements in each sub-array of the given array up to the given target index.
    Returns the resulting sum.
    array: the array to count the elements of.
    target: the target indices as an array, e.g. [3, 1, 5].
    depth: current depth in the nested arrays. Do not call with this. */
function countElementsBeforeIndex(array, target, depth) {
    var elements = 0;

    depth = depth || 0;

    if (Array.isArray(array)) {
        for (var i = 0; i < target[depth]; ++i) {
            elements += countAllElements(array[i]);
        }

        elements += countElementsBeforeIndex(array[target[depth]], target, depth + 1, i);
    }

    return elements;
}

You will see that I have provided a function, countAllElements, that counts all the elements in an array with an arbitrary level of nesting and another, countElementsBeforeIndex, which counts until it reaches a provided index. The latter method uses the former.

I hope this helps! (DEMO)

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