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I'm considering an app which will store customer data. Given the way buckets work in CouchBase, all customer data will be in one bucket. It appears that I have two choices:

  1. Implement multi-tenancy in views, by assigning a field to each record that indicates the customer it belongs to.

  2. Implement it by putting a factor on every key that is a customer ID.

It seems, though, that since I will be using views, I'll really want to do both. In case number 2, I need to have the data in the record so that it can be indexed on (or maybe I can pull out part of the key in the map phase and index on customer) and in option 1, I'd want it to be part of the key as a check when retrieving data to make sure I don't send the wrong customers data down the line.

The problem is, this is a service where multiple customers will interact, and sometimes one customer will create some data and the other will view it, at the first customers request. But putting an ACL on each record that lists everyone who's authorized to view it would be problematic, to say the least.

I bet there is a common methodology or design pattern to answer this question, and would appreciate some pointers to best practices.

I'm also concerned about the performance if the indexes are indexing both on the particular piece of relevant data, and the customer id... a large number of different customers would presumably make the indexes much less efficient. (but maybe not.)

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Building on the denormalized nature of something like Couchbase ... when a customer creates data for another customer to view ... can you simply make a copy of it and give it the correct customer restricted ID? Obviously depends on the use case. If this happens all the time it won't scale. –  ryan1234 Mar 14 '13 at 22:59
    
This is a situation of collaboration between two customers, so they'd want to be able to make changes to the same object, both of them. (though likely not simultaneously, which means either reconciling between two copies at the application layer or dealing with eventual consistency after a partition- but I think the latter would be the better choice if not for this issue of tenancy.) –  Bill Warren Mar 15 '13 at 0:28

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Here are my thoughts on your questions:

[Concerning items #1 and 2] - It seems, though, that since I will be using views, I'll really want to do both.

This doesn't seem to make sense to me. In Couchbase, the map phase can include content from both the key and the value. It makes little sense to store the data in both the key and the value, as you are guaranteed to have 1:1 duplication there. Store it wherever it makes the most sense to store it; in this case, probably the value.

The problem is, this is a service where multiple customers will interact, and sometimes one customer will create some data and the other will view it, at the first customers request. But putting an ACL on each record that lists everyone who's authorized to view it would be problematic, to say the least.

My site also has muti-tenant data stored in a single database. In my case, I use object unique identifiers as my keys. By default, customers can access all objects that belong to them (I have a user object, and the user is associated with a customer account). Users may also have additional permissions assigned to them, whereby a single object from another customer could be added to their user account, and they would thereby be granted access to view the object.

The alternative is "security through obscurity" and use guids as a random identifier, giving customers access to view any object that they have the guid for.

I would not, however, try to store the permissions on the objects themselves. That would quickly become unwieldy. You need to think about your specific use case, and decide what simple approach would work for the majority of the cases, and just not support the other 1-2% of the cases.

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Your answer makes me think that I should make a record type that is a conceptual owner of other records. So, all objects have a pointer to their owner. The collection object would also have a list of authorized users, so it can be checked before a user works with an object that it owns. In fact, different users could have different permissions with one having total permissions. Indexing on that owner object lets me quickly find objects owned by it. Not sure about the impact on index. Upvoted for now, will think further, you may have answered the Q fully. –  Bill Warren Mar 15 '13 at 21:41
    
Glad to hear it. If we're thinking the same thing, your "owner" in this case is your customer. –  theMayer Mar 15 '13 at 21:44

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