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I have a JTree in which the user can drag/drop or re-arrange nodes, upon saving I have to re-arrange the nodes such that File type nodes must appear before Folder type nodes. I don't need to sort the files/folders name.

User Tree:

 -FolderA
   +FFA1
   -FA1
   -FA2
 -FolderB
   -FB1
 -File1
 -File2
 +FolderC
 -File3

Resulting Tree:

-File1
 -File2
 -File3
 -FolderA   
   -FA1
   -FA2
   +FAF1
 -FolderB
   -FB1
 +FolderC

I have the following codes below, it worked but I don't know if it is the proper way or the good practice perhaps. Can you suggest which of the 2 solutions is better, or can you suggest other way.

Thanks you very much.

Solution 1:

private void arrange(DefaultMutableTreeNode parent){
	DefaultMutableTreeNode sorted = new DefaultMutableTreeNode();
	List<DefaultMutableTreeNode> files = new ArrayList<DefaultMutableTreeNode>();
	List<DefaultMutableTreeNode> folders = new ArrayList<DefaultMutableTreeNode>();

	for (int i = 0; i < parent.getChildCount(); i++){
		DefaultMutableTreeNode node = (DefaultMutableTreeNode) parent.getChildAt(i);
		int type = ((BusinessObject) node.getUserObject()).getType();
		if (type == BusinessObject.FILE)
			files.add(node);
		else{
			arrange(node);
			folders.add(node);
		}
	}
	for (int i = 0; i < files.size(); i++)
		sorted.add((DefaultMutableTreeNode) files.get(i));

	for (int i = 0; i < folders.size(); i++)
		sorted.add((DefaultMutableTreeNode) folders.get(i));

	while (sorted.getChildCount() > 0)
		parent.add((DefaultMutableTreeNode) sorted.getChildAt(0));

	sorted = null;
	files = null;
	folders = null;
}

Solution 2:

private void arrange(DefaultMutableTreeNode parent){
	DefaultMutableTreeNode sorted = new DefaultMutableTreeNode();
	List<DefaultMutableTreeNode> nodes = new ArrayList<DefaultMutableTreeNode>();

	for (int i = 0; i < parent.getChildCount(); i++){
		DefaultMutableTreeNode node = (DefaultMutableTreeNode) parent.getChildAt(i);
		int type = ((BusinessObject) node.getUserObject()).getType();
		if (type == BusinessObject.FILE)
			nodes.add(node);
	}

	for (int i = 0; i < parent.getChildCount(); i++){
		DefaultMutableTreeNode node = (DefaultMutableTreeNode) parent.getChildAt(i);
		int type = ((BusinessObject) node.getUserObject()).getType();
		if (type == BusinessObject.FOLDER){
			arrange(node);
			nodes.add(node);
		}
	}

	for (int i = 0; i < nodes.size(); i++)
		sorted.add((DefaultMutableTreeNode) nodes.get(i));

	while (sorted.getChildCount() > 0)
		parent.add((DefaultMutableTreeNode) sorted.getChildAt(0));

	sorted = null;
	nodes = null;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think both are fine solutions. It was pretty easy to tell what they were doing: pull out the files, pull out the folders, throw them back in the tree in the right order. Also, the recursive call was straight-forward and intuitive.

Pick whichever seems the most natural to you. The second seems more like the way I would do it, but that's just me, and there's not much difference.

Are you using Java 5 or 6? If so, use for-each loops. Also, you don't have to clear that values of your private variables at the end of the method. They go away anyhow when the method returns.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jeremy, I am also thinking of #2 is better because there is only one instance of the list is created. –  jerjer Oct 12 '09 at 1:50

this actually works as i use it in my application. My nodes are all defaultmutabletreenodes with no changes. The node to be sorted is passed in and changed. It makes an arraylist of the child nodes. Then two arraylists of the text of the nodes which one gets sorted. The other is used to find the nodes in the arralylist. The nodes are all moved off of the initial node then added back in from the arraylist. Works a charm, may be overkill to use an arraylist but I like them.

private void sortchildren(DefaultMutableTreeNode node) {
        ArrayList children = Collections.list(node.children());
        // for getting original location
        ArrayList<String> orgCnames = new ArrayList<String>();
        // new location
        ArrayList<String> cNames = new ArrayList<String>();
        //move the child to here so we can move them back
        DefaultMutableTreeNode temParent = new DefaultMutableTreeNode();
        for(Object child:children) {
            DefaultMutableTreeNode ch = (DefaultMutableTreeNode)child;
            temParent.insert(ch,0);
            cNames.add(ch.toString().toUpperCase());
            orgCnames.add(ch.toString().toUpperCase());
        }
        Collections.sort(cNames);
        for(String name:cNames) {
            // find the original location to get from children arrayList
            int indx = orgCnames.indexOf(name);
            node.insert((DefaultMutableTreeNode)children.get(indx),node.getChildCount());
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

I modified Mike's code example a bit to account for duplicate names, and sorting folders before files. Otherwise it worked like a dream. Thanks Mike.

public static void sortTreeNode(DefaultMutableTreeNode node) {
List<DefaultMutableTreeNode> children = Collections.list(node.children());
List<String> sortFileNames = new ArrayList<>();
List<String> sortFolderNames = new ArrayList<>();
List<String> sortNames = new ArrayList<>();
List<String> origNames = new ArrayList<>();
DefaultMutableTreeNode temParent = new DefaultMutableTreeNode();
for (int x = 0; x < children.size(); x++) {
    DefaultMutableTreeNode child = children.get(x);
    temParent.insert(child, 0);
    if (!child.isLeaf()) {
    sortFolderNames.add(ViewMethods.getStringForNode(child).toUpperCase() + x);
    origNames.add(ViewMethods.getStringForNode(child).toUpperCase() + x);
    if (child.getChildCount() > 0) {
        sortTreeNode(child);
    }
    } else {
    sortFileNames.add(ViewMethods.getStringForNode(child).toUpperCase() + x);
    origNames.add(ViewMethods.getStringForNode(child).toUpperCase() + x);
    }
}
Collections.sort(sortFolderNames);
Collections.sort(sortFileNames);
sortNames.addAll(sortFolderNames);
sortNames.addAll(sortFileNames);
for (String name : sortNames) {
    // find the original location to get from children arrayList
    int indx = origNames.indexOf(name);
    node.insert(children.get(indx), node.getChildCount());
}
}
share|improve this answer

It is verry simple : Put all Leafs of a folder in to an array (named hear o_people)

    DefaultMutableTreeNode all_node = 
     new DefaultMutableTreeNode("Root folder");
    DefaultMutableTreeNode one_node;
    Vector sorted_people=new Vector();
    // a simple algorithm of sorting array
    for (int i=0;i&lt;o_people.length-1;i++){
    for (int j=i+1;j&lt;o_people.length;j++){
        if(o_people[j].toString().compareTo
           (o_people[i].toString())<0) {

            String permut=o_people[i].toString();
            o_people[i]=o_people[j];
            o_people[j]=permut;

        }

    }
    sorted_people.add(o_people[i]);

   //in my case the leaf is a JChechbox but you can put a String
    one_node = new DefaultMutableTreeNode
     ( new JCheckBox(o_people[i].toString(), boolien));
    all_node.add(one_node);
    }

    tree_model.setRoot(all_node);

Simple !!! isn't it ?

share|improve this answer
2  
a general rule is: don't re-invent the wheel :-) See the other answers for available api on Collections. –  kleopatra Dec 3 '12 at 14:39

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