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Is there a way via .NET/C# to find out the number of CPU cores?

PS This is a straight code question, not a "Should I use multi-threading?" question! :-)

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1  
Do you need to know how many cores there are or how many logical processors there are? For just running multiple threads, either is probably sufficient, but there are scenarios where the difference could be important. –  Kevin Kibler Apr 19 '10 at 20:27
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4 Answers

up vote 203 down vote accepted

There are several different pieces of information relating to processors that you could get:

  1. Number of physical processors
  2. Number of cores
  3. Number of logical processors.

These can all be different; in the case of a machine with 2 dual-core hyper-threading-enabled processors, there are 2 physical processors, 4 cores, and 8 logical processors.

The number of logical processors is available through the Environment class, but the other information is only available through WMI (and you may have to install some hotfixes or service packs to get it on some systems):

Physical Processors:

foreach (var item in new System.Management.ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * from Win32_ComputerSystem").Get())
{
    Console.WriteLine("Number Of Physical Processors: {0} ", item["NumberOfProcessors"]);
}

Cores:

int coreCount = 0;
foreach (var item in new System.Management.ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * from Win32_Processor").Get())
{
    coreCount += int.Parse(item["NumberOfCores"].ToString());
}
Console.WriteLine("Number Of Cores: {0}", coreCount);

Logical Processors:

Console.WriteLine("Number Of Logical Processors: {0}", Environment.ProcessorCount);

OR

foreach (var item in new System.Management.ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * from Win32_ComputerSystem").Get())
{
    Console.WriteLine("Number Of Logical Processors: {0}", item["NumberOfLogicalProcessors"]);
}

Processors excluded from Windows:

You can also use Windows API calls in setupapi.dll to discover processors that have been excluded from Windows (e.g. through boot settings) and aren't detectable using the above means. The code below gives the total number of logical processors (I haven't been able to figure out how to differentiate physical from logical processors) that exist, including those that have been excluded from Windows:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int deviceCount = 0;
    IntPtr deviceList = IntPtr.Zero;
    // GUID for processor classid
    Guid processorGuid = new Guid("{50127dc3-0f36-415e-a6cc-4cb3be910b65}");

    try
    {
        // get a list of all processor devices
        deviceList = SetupDiGetClassDevs(ref processorGuid, "ACPI", IntPtr.Zero, (int)DIGCF.PRESENT);
        // attempt to process each item in the list
        for (int deviceNumber = 0; ; deviceNumber++)
        {
            SP_DEVINFO_DATA deviceInfo = new SP_DEVINFO_DATA();
            deviceInfo.cbSize = Marshal.SizeOf(deviceInfo);

            // attempt to read the device info from the list, if this fails, we're at the end of the list
            if (!SetupDiEnumDeviceInfo(deviceList, deviceNumber, ref deviceInfo))
            {
                deviceCount = deviceNumber - 1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        if (deviceList != IntPtr.Zero) { SetupDiDestroyDeviceInfoList(deviceList); }
    }
    Console.WriteLine("Number of cores: {0}", deviceCount);
}

[DllImport("setupapi.dll", SetLastError = true)]
private static extern IntPtr SetupDiGetClassDevs(ref Guid ClassGuid,
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]String enumerator,
    IntPtr hwndParent,
    Int32 Flags);

[DllImport("setupapi.dll", SetLastError = true)]
private static extern Int32 SetupDiDestroyDeviceInfoList(IntPtr DeviceInfoSet);

[DllImport("setupapi.dll", SetLastError = true)]
private static extern bool SetupDiEnumDeviceInfo(IntPtr DeviceInfoSet,
    Int32 MemberIndex,
    ref SP_DEVINFO_DATA DeviceInterfaceData);

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
private struct SP_DEVINFO_DATA
{
    public int cbSize;
    public Guid ClassGuid;
    public uint DevInst;
    public IntPtr Reserved;
}

private enum DIGCF
{
    DEFAULT = 0x1,
    PRESENT = 0x2,
    ALLCLASSES = 0x4,
    PROFILE = 0x8,
    DEVICEINTERFACE = 0x10,
}
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3  
All Hail WMI! - that repository has almost everything =) –  StingyJack Apr 19 '10 at 20:29
4  
@StingyJack: True, but I wish it were in a nicer format. Discoverability is pretty low when you have to build raw string queries. –  Kevin Kibler Apr 19 '10 at 20:31
2  
WMI Code Creator will help with value discovery and query creation (it can even generate stubs in c#/vb.net). –  StingyJack Apr 20 '10 at 12:53
1  
Great info, thx. I've changed this as the accepted answer. –  Gregg Cleland Aug 5 '10 at 8:11
1  
It's in System.Management.dll. Did you you include a reference to that assembly in your project? –  Kevin Kibler Aug 12 '13 at 13:45
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Environment.ProcessorCount

[Documentation]

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6  
That's so beautifully simple I'm almost shedding tears. Thx for the reply! –  Gregg Cleland Oct 9 '09 at 10:43
27  
This gives the number of logical processors, not the number of cores. –  Kevin Kibler Apr 19 '10 at 20:23
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Environment.ProcessorCount should give you the number of cores on the local machine.

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As easy it can get. Thx for your reply! –  Gregg Cleland Oct 9 '09 at 10:44
16  
This gives the number of logical processors, not the number of cores. –  Kevin Kibler Apr 19 '10 at 20:25
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WMI queries are slow, so try to Select only the desired members instead of using Select *.

The following query takes 3.4s:

foreach (var item in new System.Management.ManagementObjectSearcher("Select * from Win32_Processor").Get())

While this one takes 0.122s:

foreach (var item in new System.Management.ManagementObjectSearcher("Select NumberOfCores from Win32_Processor").Get())
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1  
What system are you running this on? I use multiple "Select *" queries and it doesn't take anywhere near 3.4 seconds, tested on thousands of computers that my software is deployed on. I do a Select * because I am getting multiple properties from the object. However, I do it a bit different: create an ObjectQuery on the Select *; get the ManagementObjectCollection; then foreach ManagementObject in the ManagementObjectCollection. –  deegee Aug 11 '13 at 20:23
    
thanks, it's really much faster –  Vlad L Sep 3 '13 at 10:23
    
@deegee: you are right, the query itself does not take much longer with "Select *", it's just that the int parsing below is slow if iterating all the values returned instead of just NumberOfCores. –  Aleix Mercader Sep 13 '13 at 11:01
    
@AleixMercader : Understood. –  deegee Sep 13 '13 at 18:10
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