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I am impressed by looking the way Google implemented a very neat and elegant tab system to navigate in their web services. Below is an image from Google calendar.

Menu

I think that this can be achieved using pure CSS. For example, suppose if I have a menu like this;

<div class="menu">
  <div class="item">item1</div>
  <div class="item">item2</div>
  <div class="item">item3</div>
  <div class="item">item4</div>
</div>

how can I achieve a similar look using CSS (with / without images).

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use Developer Tools (Chrome / IE / Firebug in Firefox) to inspect the page and see exactly how they are doing it.

I started you out with a jsFiddle simply by copying over the code from those particular buttons, and grabbing the CSS rules. Obviously I'm missing a few, because it doesn't look exactly the same, but as you add in more rules you can see exactly what they are doing to achieve that result.

You can copy an entire CSS rule directly from the Styles tab on the right in Chrome.

http://jsfiddle.net/XLd3R/

.goog-inline-block {
    position: relative;
    display: -moz-inline-box;
    display: inline-block;
}
.trans-strip {
    background: -webkit-linear-gradient(right, rgba(255, 255, 255, 1.0), rgba(255, 255, 255, .5));
    background: -moz-linear-gradient(right, rgba(255, 255, 255, 1.0), rgba(255, 255, 255, .5));
}
.button-strip {
    white-space: nowrap;
}
.goog-imageless-button-collapse-right {
    border-bottom-right-radius: 0;
    border-top-right-radius: 0;
    margin-right: -1px;
    -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 0;
    -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 0;
    -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 0;
    -moz-border-radius-topright: 0;
}
.goog-imageless-button, .navbuttonouter {
    background: #f5f5f5;
    background-image: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, left bottom, from(#f5f5f5), to(#f1f1f1));
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(top, #f5f5f5, #f1f1f1);
    background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(top, #f5f5f5, #f1f1f1);
    background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(top, #f5f5f5, #f1f1f1);
    background-image: -o-linear-gradient(top, #f5f5f5, #f1f1f1);
    background-image: linear-gradient(top, #f5f5f5, #f1f1f1);
    border: 1px solid #dcdcdc;
    border: 1px solid rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1);
    border-radius: 2px;
    color: #444;
    cursor: pointer;
    font-size: 11px;
    font-weight: bold;
    height: 27px;
    line-height: 27px;
    min-width: 54px;
    outline: none;
    padding: 0 8px;
    text-align: center;
    transition: all .218s;
    -moz-border-radius: 2px;
    -moz-transition: all .218s;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -o-transition: all .218s;
    -webkit-border-radius: 2px;
    -webkit-transition: all .218s;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
}
.goog-imageless-button, .navbuttonouter {
    color: #444;
    cursor: pointer;
    font-size: 11px;
    font-weight: bold;
    line-height: 27px;
    text-align: center;
}
share|improve this answer
    
fiddle is not showing exactly what i mentioned –  blasteralfred Ψ Mar 15 '13 at 0:16
3  
I mentioned that. It's just to give you a start. "Obviously I'm missing a few, because it doesn't look exactly the same, but as you add in more rules you can see exactly what they are doing to achieve that result." –  Aaron Blenkush Mar 15 '13 at 0:16
    
Why should it have to be exactly what you mentioned? Aaron took the time to explain to you how you can find your solution. That's what SO is for, not getting people to do your work for you. –  Jason Mar 15 '13 at 3:52

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